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Consider a base class:

class A(object):
   def __init__(self, x):
      self._x = x

   def get_x(self):
      #...
      return self._x

   def set_x(self, x):
      #...
      self._x = x

   x = property(get_x, set_x)

and a derived class:

class B(A):
   def set_x(self, x):
      #...
      self._x = x**2

   x = property(A.get_x, set_x)

Is there an elegant way of overloading set_x() in class B, without re-declaring it and the property x? Thank you.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this one:

 class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = 0

    def get_x(self):
        #...
        return self._x

    def set_x(self, x):
        #...
        self._x = x

    x = property(get_x, lambda self,x : self.set_x(x))

class B(A):
    def set_x(self, x):
        #...
        self._x = x**2

The extra indirection given by the lambda will make the set_x function virtually.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, rodrigo! Exactly what I've been looking for :) –  BasicWolf Jul 29 '11 at 10:58

Add an extra layer of indirection (i.e. use a hook):

class A(object):
    def __init__(self, x):
        self._x = x

    # Using a _get_hook is not strictly necessary for your problem...
    def _get_hook(self):
        return self._x
    def get_x(self):
        return self._get_hook()

    # By delegating `set_x` behavior to `_set_hook`, you make it possible
    # to override `_set_hook` behavior in subclass B.
    def _set_hook(self, x):
        self._x=x
    def set_x(self, x):
        self._set_hook(x)

    x = property(get_x, set_x)

class B(A):
    def _set_hook(self, x):
        print('got here!')
        self._x = x**2

b=B(5)
b.x=10
# got here!
print(b.x)
# 100

For modern versions of Python, you can also use the @property decorator:

class A(object):

   @property
   def x(self):
      return self._get_hook()

   @x.setter
   def x(self, x):
      self._set_hook(x)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I considered that approach, but don't you think that adding a hook is much more confusing than re-declaring a setter? –  BasicWolf Jul 29 '11 at 9:06
    
@BasicWolf: Actually, I think using hooks is clearer than re-declaring the entire property. Note that when you "re-declare" the property, you are actually defining a new property object in class B. So with your approach, you end up with a property object in class A and class B. With every additional subclass you define, you may end up with yet another property. In contrast, using hooks makes the flow of control clear and simple. –  unutbu Jul 29 '11 at 10:06
    
@BasicWolf: In terms of speed, perhaps your way is better since it involves more direct attribute lookup and fewer function calls, but in terms of organization, I think using hooks is better. Moreover, worrying about speed before design is a wrong-headed pre-optimization. –  unutbu Jul 29 '11 at 10:14

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