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Is it a bad practice to put a thread in a while(true) loop and test if a condition is ok to start a treatment?

void run()
{
    for(;;)
    {
        if(dataReady)
        {
            processData();
        }
    }
}

is it preferable to use wait/condition mechanism :

void run()
{
    for(;;)
    {
        if(dataReady)
        {
            processData();
        }
        lock_guard lock(mutex);
        condition_.wait(lock);
    }
}

Another thread of course calls condition_.notify_one()

EDIT:

I expect to almost never wait.

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1  
Keep in mind that unless dataReady is some sort of atomic or lock-protected data type, it would be a data race. (For example, if it was a vanilla bool.) –  GManNickG Jul 29 '11 at 8:56
    
I expect to almost never wait. That can be a little misleading. Assuming you only wait once in 10,000,000. That can still be quite a lot of waits when you have a CPU running at 4GHz –  Loki Astari Jul 29 '11 at 9:54
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It depends on the amount of time you expect to be waiting.

For very short periods a busy-wait can be preferable because it wouldn't involve a context switch as the other technique. The overhead of the context switch may sometimes overweigh the whole busy-wait loop.

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while true is a bad way because it just eats processing cycles.
Second approach is better, where in the thread gets intimated only when it has to perform some work.

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4  
I'll say in most cases. There are times where a spinlock is appropriate, but those who are working in those cases don't generally need to ask if it's the case. :) –  GManNickG Jul 29 '11 at 8:54
    
Intimated? It has intimate relations? –  Puppy Jul 29 '11 at 8:57
    
@DeadMG: Intimate Definition: To announce; to declare; to publish; to communicate; to make known. –  Alok Save Jul 29 '11 at 8:59
    
bailing out to OS and a context switch is way more expensive than few busy wait loops. @GMan says people who know how to use spinlocks won't be asking much at SO. Spinlocks are good design if you have enough cores as spinlocks improve latency. –  bestsss Jul 30 '11 at 18:34
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If you do it the first way you'll need to ensure that the compiler actualy reads the variable from memory and doesn't optimize out the reads from memory as the value can't change inside that loop. Declaring the variable as "volatile" is necessary to do this.

But that on it's own is not sufficient. You need some form of memory barrier to ensure that changes to the variable in one thread are visible to the other, and the stores and reads don't get reordered by the CPU and cache. If this is on x86 you'll probably get away without it. But if you want to do this kind of thing you're much better using compiler intrinsics such as InterlockedIncrement (on windows, or similar on other platforms).

For almost all cases you're better using a condition variable, or a spin lock from a library (which is essentially what you are trying to implement) because they'll get the details correct for multi core processing.

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volatile doesn't need to be there in an actual solution. –  GManNickG Jul 30 '11 at 21:01
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It is always much more advised to do the latter. But this is a basic question in any threading or concurrent treatise...

In older processors, where there was only one thread, and where the power was consumed no matter what the processor was doing, this was a common idiom to wait for things. Now processors have several threads that can advance, and also they are intelligent enough to not to spend power if you're just waiting on a condition.

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The former is usually a terrible idea because you'll use 100% CPU on one core doing nothing. You'll eat up resources that could've been used by some other thread (perhaps the one that was supposed to set dataready.

In the second example, the thread is put on hold until it is notified. So it doesn't eat up CPU time.

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What you are saying is true in many cases but not always. If you hardly ever have to wait then the overhead of a system call will likely use more cpu time. Plus sometimes your priority is low latency rather than low cpu usage, in which case a spinlock might well be a good idea despite using 100% cpu... It depends on the application –  jcoder Jul 29 '11 at 9:23
    
@JohnB: Note that I said usually. Note also that we are answering someone who does not know what the difference is, and therefore msot likely do not need to know about the very rare corner cases where polling is preferable. Yes, you are correct, but I don't really see this helping the OP –  jalf Jul 29 '11 at 9:28
    
Indeed, that's all fair comment. –  jcoder Jul 29 '11 at 9:45
    
@John : I have low latency constraint.so maybe the spinlock is better in this case indeed. –  Guillaume07 Jul 30 '11 at 16:04
    
@Guillaume: maybe. Usually not. What kind of latency are we talking about? In most practical cases, a spinlock is absolutely not worth it. As always, if it's important, then measure it. But if your latency constraint is measured in milliseconds, a lock is the better solution. If it is measured in nanoseconds, a spinlock might be preferable. But always avoid spinlocks until you've measured that they're preferable in your case. –  jalf Jul 30 '11 at 21:38
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Yes, it is bad practice. Busy loops are a legitimate design choice only in places where sophisticated constructs like locks and threads are not available.

Although, if you can guarantee that your software is the only application running on the device (might be the case in embedded projects) you can possibly resort to a busy loop.

But in general, please avoid them.

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