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I know there are many tools for this already. My goal is to learn. So I can read a JPEG file with fopen(), I know this is a binary file. Then what? I know that i can learn the JPEG specifications. But it doesn't seem to tell what is the structure of the binary jpeg file.

This file contains zeros and ones How can i transform this or how can i know which chain of bits means what ?

I've come across this example: nano jpeg decoder But it's pretty hard to read the code

Thanks in advance

PS: This princeton guy has done a project on this which provides a good reference

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The structure appears to be rather loosie-goosie. I'd like to see answers from anyone with in-depth knowledge of working with this format. –  luser droog Aug 1 '11 at 19:47
    
Princetone link is dead. Guess they graduated... –  John C Jan 21 '14 at 21:17
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Guy from Princeton graduated and his project PDF can be found on his website now : ctralie.com/PrincetonUGRAD/Projects/JPEG/jpeg.pdf –  Optimized Coder Dec 18 '14 at 1:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted
+50

This page has a lot of info on how to process a jpeg file. Also, you can take a look at my own attempt at writing a jpeg decoder in Python.

The short variable names in the program often correspond directly to variables in the standard. So if you have the standard ready, it'll help a lot. It's called ITU-1150 and is freely available on the Internet.

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By treating your Python code as pseudocode, this may be just what OP needs. –  luser droog Aug 1 '11 at 20:02
    
@luser That was my original motivation for writing it. I'd prototype in Python and then translate to C, but I never got around doing it. :) –  onemasse Aug 4 '11 at 11:17
    
If you could walk us through the code with some chatty commentary, that would earn the bounty. Possibly acceptance, too, if OP ever checks back in :) –  luser droog Aug 4 '11 at 16:53
    
The short variable names in the program often correspond directly to variables in the standard. So if you have the standard ready, it'll help a lot. It's called ITU-1150 and is freely available on the Internet. I can't remember where though. I will try and upload a version with comments tonight. –  onemasse Aug 4 '11 at 17:29
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Ah, here it is: w3.org/Graphics/JPEG/itu-t81.pdf –  onemasse Aug 4 '11 at 17:32

Jpegs are tricky if you're just starting. You need to work with huffmann tables, have some sort of fast inverse discrete cosine transform function, and the ability to interpret quantization tables.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JPEG is rather helpful.

If you want to start with something simpler, look at PNGs. The format is basically a header, followed by a bunch of variable length, chunks, and then a zlib stream. Decompressing that leaves you with almost-raw pixels, but they've been filtered. Unfiltering is easy.

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