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I have create two tables with reference with another table:

I like this:

Table1:

CREATE TABLE species 
(
  id TINYINT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, 
  name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL, 
  PRIMARY KEY(id)
) ENGINE=INNODB;

Table2 (Reference of the above table)

CREATE TABLE zoo 
(
  id INT(4) NOT NULL, 
  name VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,
  FK_species TINYINT(4) NOT NULL, 
  INDEX (FK_species), 
  FOREIGN KEY (FK_species) REFERENCES species (id), 
  PRIMARY KEY(id)
) ENGINE=INNODB;

Than its automatically create an index for the FOREIGN KEY for FK_species in zoo table.

Now I am try to delete the Index of the zoo table:

ALTER TABLE zoo DROP INDEX FK_species;

Its showing the following MySQL error.

Error on rename of '.\test\#sql-1ec_9d' to '.\test\zoo' (errno: 150)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From FOREIGN KEY Constraints @ dev.mysql.com:

InnoDB supports the use of ALTER TABLE to drop foreign keys:

ALTER TABLE tbl_name DROP FOREIGN KEY fk_symbol;

If the FOREIGN KEY clause included a CONSTRAINT name when you created the foreign key, you can refer to that name to drop the foreign key. Otherwise, the fk_symbol value is internally generated by InnoDB when the foreign key is created. To find out the symbol value when you want to drop a foreign key, use the SHOW CREATE TABLE statement.

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Interesting. Does that mean you cannot drop the index without dropping the constraint? –  a_horse_with_no_name Jul 29 '11 at 9:35
    
Yes that is problem i face here, because the foreign key created the index automatically... Please tell me how to create foreign key with out indexes. –  Manikandan Thangaraj Jul 29 '11 at 9:48
    
@Manikandan: (from same link): "InnoDB requires indexes on foreign keys and referenced keys so that foreign key checks can be fast and not require a table scan. In the referencing table, there must be an index where the foreign key columns are listed as the first columns in the same order. Such an index is created on the referencing table automatically if it does not exist. This index might be silently dropped later, if you create another index that can be used to enforce the foreign key constraint. index_name, if given, is used as described previously. " –  ypercube Jul 29 '11 at 9:59
    
On that they said "This index might be silently dropped later, if you create another index that can be used to enforce the foreign key constraint". –  Manikandan Thangaraj Jul 29 '11 at 11:29

You need to get the contraints name first.

Example:

SHOW CREATE TABLE zoo;

-> .... 
   CONSTRAINT `zoo_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`FK_species`) REFERENCES `species` (`id`)

...and then...

ALTER TABLE zoo DROP FOREIGN KEY zoo_ibfk_1;

Read more about this here: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/innodb-foreign-key-constraints.html

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