Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

any idea how if the following is possible in PHP as a single line ?:

<?php
$firstElement = functionThatReturnsAnArray()[0];

... It doesn't seem to 'take'. I need to do this as a 2-stepper:

<?php
$allElements = functionThatReturnsAnArray();
$firstElement = $allElements[0];

... just curious - other languages I play with allow things like this, and I'm lazy enoug to miss this in PHP ... any insight appreciated ...

share|improve this question
1  
Upgrade to PHP 5.4 and you can then do array dereferencing. You can find it in the manual here. –  hakre May 1 '12 at 22:46
add comment

17 Answers 17

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try:

<?php
$firstElement = reset(functionThatReturnsAnArray());

If you're just looking for the first element of the array.

share|improve this answer
    
That's really cool. Thanks! –  Mark Biek Sep 16 '08 at 2:18
    
agreed - and in my case this actually works pretty well. Thx so much for this! –  Dave Carpeneto Sep 16 '08 at 16:01
    
awesome, never read the manual for reset() –  Darryl Hein Oct 5 '08 at 3:08
    
Lovely. Huge refactoring tonight then! –  Ken Nov 18 '08 at 15:47
1  
It works but now you have to spend extra brain cycles to translate from reset(func()) to func()[0] when you look at the code. –  Pavel Chuchuva May 1 '09 at 2:32
add comment

@Scott Reynen

that's not true. This will work:

list(,,$thirdElement) = $myArray;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Unfortunately, that is not possible with PHP. You have to use two lines to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this is one of the flaws with PHP. –  grom Sep 16 '08 at 2:25
    
well, it's a pain, but it's not a show-stopper really is it? I mean, given the reputation of PHP for poorly-formed and badly managed code, maybe it's a good thing! :p –  nickf Sep 16 '08 at 11:48
    
actually, the other answers pointing me to list & reset work well - not pretty, but they do what i want them to :-) I love this web site ! –  Dave Carpeneto Sep 16 '08 at 16:09
add comment

You can do this in one line! Use array_shift().

<?php

echo array_shift(i_return_an_array());

function i_return_an_array() {
    return array('foo', 'bar', 'baz');
}

When this is executed, it will echo "foo".

share|improve this answer
add comment

list() is useful here. With any but the first array element, you'll need to pad it with useless variables. For example:

list( $firstElement ) = functionThatReturnsAnArray();
list( $firstElement , $secondElement ) = functionThatReturnsAnArray();

And so on.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Either current($array) or array_shift($array) will work, the former will leave the array intact.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I actually use a convenience function i wrote for such purposes:

/**
 * Grabs an element from an array using a key much like array_pop
 */
function array_key_value($array, $key) {
    if(!empty($array) && array_key_exists($key, $array)) {
		return $array[$key];
	}
	else {
		return FALSE;
	}
}

then you just call it like so:

$result = array_key_value(getMeAnArray(), 'arrayKey');
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use array_slice(), like so:

$elementX = array_slice(functionThatReturnsAnArray(), $x, 1);

Also noticed that end() is not mentioned. It returns the last element of an array.

share|improve this answer
add comment

nickf, good to know, thanks. Unfortunately that has readability problems beyond a few commas.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah that's very true - i avoid it whenever I can, but it's still possible! :) –  nickf Sep 16 '08 at 11:50
add comment

I think any of the above would require a comment to explain what you're doing, thus becoming two lines. I find it simpler to do:

$element = functionThatReturnsArray();
$element = $element[0];

This way, you're not using an extra variable and it's obvious what you're doing.

share|improve this answer
add comment
$firstItem = current(returnsArray());
share|improve this answer
add comment

Well, I have found a couple of ways to get what you want without calling another function.

$firstElement = ($t = functionThatReturnsAnArray()) ? $t[0] : false;

and for strings you could use

$string = (($t = functionThatReturnsAnArray())==0) . $t[0];

.. Interesting problem

Draco

share|improve this answer
add comment

I am guessing that this is a built-in or library function, since it sounds like you cannot edit it directly. I recommend creating a wrapper function to give you the output you need:

function functionThatReturnsOneElement( $arg )
{
    $result = functionThatReturnsAnArray( $arg );
    return $result[0];
}
$firstElement = functionThatReturnsOneElement();
share|improve this answer
add comment

As far as I know this is not possible, I have wanted to do this myself several times.

share|improve this answer
add comment

http://us3.php.net/reset

Only available in php version 5.

share|improve this answer
    
definitely works in PHP4 –  nickf Sep 16 '08 at 2:18
add comment

If it's always the first element, you should probably think about having the function return just the first item in the array. If that is the most common case, you could use a little bit of coolness:

function func($first = false) {
    ...
    if $first return $array[0];
    else return $array;
}

$array = func();
$item = func(true);

My php is slightly rusty, but i'm pretty sure that works.

You can also look at array_shift() and array_pop().

This is probably also possible:

array(func())[0][i];

The 0 is for the function.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Sometimes I'll change the function, so it can optionally return an element instead of the entire array:

<?php
function functionThatReturnsAnArray($n = NULL) {
  return ($n === NULL ? $myArray : $myArray[$n]);
}
$firstElement = functionThatReturnsAnArray(0);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.