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I'm trying to plot the batman equation. A solution in sympy or matplotlib will be great (sage isn't cool because I'm using windows). The problem is that if I comment out certain parts the part of the figure appears but with all the F *= parts, I get a blank plot.

import matplotlib.pyplot
from numpy import arange
from numpy import meshgrid
from numpy import sqrt
from numpy import real

delta = 0.01
xrange = arange(-7.0, 7.0, delta)
yrange = arange(-3.0, 3.0, delta)
x, y = meshgrid(xrange,yrange)

F = 1
F *= (((x/7) ** 2) * sqrt(abs(abs(x) - 3)/(abs(x) - 3)) + ((y / 3) ** 2) * sqrt(abs(y + (3 * sqrt(33)) / 7)/(y + (3 * sqrt(33)) / 7)) - 1)
F *= (abs(x/2) - ((3 * sqrt(33) - 7)/112) * x**2 - 3 + sqrt(1 - (abs(abs(x) - 2) - 1) ** 2 ) - y)
F *= (9 * sqrt(abs((abs(x) - 1) * (abs(x) - 3/4))/((1 - abs(x)) * (abs(x) - 3/4))) - 8 * abs(x) - y)
F *= (3 * abs(x) + 0.75 * sqrt(abs((abs(x) - 3/4) * (abs(x) - 1/2))/((3/4 - abs(x)) * (abs(x) - 1/2))) - y)
F *= ((9/4) * sqrt(abs((x - 1/2) * (x + 1/2))/((1/2 - x) * (1/2 + x))) - y)
F *= ((6 * sqrt(10)) / 7 + (3/2 - abs(x)/2) * sqrt(abs(abs(x) - 1)/(abs(x) - 1)) - ((6 * sqrt(10))/ 14) * sqrt(4 - (abs(x) - 1) ** 2 ) - y)
G = 0

matplotlib.pyplot.contour(x, y, (F - G), [0])
matplotlib.pyplot.show()

What's going on here? If the graph is zero for one multiplicand, it should still be so no matter which other multiplicands I throw in there.

source of the batman equation: http://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/j2qjc/do_you_like_batman_do_you_like_math_my_math/

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What version of python are you using? If not 3.x, then you need to from __future__ import division to avoid floor division with all those ints. –  Paul Jul 29 '11 at 12:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The parameter of sqrt is negative for many points, so the finally products are all NaN. You can plot every factor as following:

from __future__ import division  # this is important, otherwise 1/2 will be 0
import matplotlib.pyplot
from numpy import arange
from numpy import meshgrid
from numpy import sqrt
from numpy import real


delta = 0.01
xrange = arange(-7.0, 7.0, delta)
yrange = arange(-3.0, 3.0, delta)
x, y = meshgrid(xrange,yrange)

F1 = (((x/7) ** 2) * sqrt(abs(abs(x) - 3)/(abs(x) - 3)) + ((y / 3) ** 2) * sqrt(abs(y + (3 * sqrt(33)) / 7)/(y + (3 * sqrt(33)) / 7)) - 1)
F2 = (abs(x/2) - ((3 * sqrt(33) - 7)/112) * x**2 - 3 + sqrt(1 - (abs(abs(x) - 2) - 1) ** 2 ) - y)
F3 = (9 * sqrt(abs((abs(x) - 1) * (abs(x) - 3/4))/((1 - abs(x)) * (abs(x) - 3/4))) - 8 * abs(x) - y)
F4 = (3 * abs(x) + 0.75 * sqrt(abs((abs(x) - 3/4) * (abs(x) - 1/2))/((3/4 - abs(x)) * (abs(x) - 1/2))) - y)
F5 = ((9/4) * sqrt(abs((x - 1/2) * (x + 1/2))/((1/2 - x) * (1/2 + x))) - y)
F6 = ((6 * sqrt(10)) / 7 + (3/2 - abs(x)/2) * sqrt(abs(abs(x) - 1)/(abs(x) - 1)) - ((6 * sqrt(10))/ 14) * sqrt(4 - (abs(x) - 1) ** 2 ) - y)


for f in [F1,F2,F3,F4,F5,F6]:
    matplotlib.pyplot.contour(x, y, f, [0])
matplotlib.pyplot.show()

the result plot: enter image description here

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Nice catch with the future division as well. I tried to use numpy.lib.scimath.sqrt which works with imaginary numbers but then the function is defined in too many regions and has a few irrelevant lines. Thank you :) –  ubershmekel Jul 30 '11 at 9:15

I know this might seem lame, but how about creating a list of x values, and then computing the value of "batman" at each of those positions, and storing in another list. You could define a function "batman" which computes the y value for each x value you pass in.

Then just plot those lists with matplotlib.

EDIT: Since you've made numpy arrays already to store the results, you could use those when computing the y values.

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I'm not even sure how this equation would work, since I see divisions by zero arising in the first term (under the first square root, when abs(x) = 3), and imaginary numbers showing up in the last term (under the last square root, when {abs(x)-1}^2 > 4, ie x > 3 or x < -3).
What am I missing here? Is only the real part of the result used, and are divisions by zero ignored or approximated?

Running this, I do indeed see lots of RunTimeWarnings, and it is not unlikely matplotlib would get totally confused what numbers to work with (NaNs, Infs; trying print F at the end). Looks like it still manages when there's only a relatively low number of NaNs or Infs, which would explain that you're seeing part of the figure.
I'd think matplotlib's contour is fine, just confused by the input.

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How do you get the warnings, is there a debug mode for matplotlib? Anyhow I'm guessing that the regions that are imaginary should not be plotted (if the result isn't zero...). Does matplotlib not support imaginary arithmetic? The division by zero only affects a small set of points which can be ignored. –  ubershmekel Jul 29 '11 at 10:55
    
that's interesting - I didn't get as far as looking at the maths :) –  samb8s Jul 29 '11 at 12:36
    
I don't know about any debug mode; perhaps it's the matplotlib, numpy or python version I'm using. Looking at the answer above, I realise what's the problem: each part of the equation has a certain number of NaNs and non-NaNs; matplotlib will plot the non-NaNs. When multiplied, however, you end up with all NaNs and nothing gets plotted. Very basic example: F1=[NaN, 5, NaN], F2=[NaN, NaN, 3], F3=[2, NaN, NaN]; F1*F2*F3 = [NaN, NaN, NaN]. Hence you'll need to plot each of them separately. It's not so much about multiplying something by zero, but about multiplying something by a NaN. –  Evert Jul 31 '11 at 10:07

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