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Given any String like 'Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit' I'd like to discard every word before sit. I've checked methods in String but not found very useful for this one. This is my try:

| phrase newPhrase |
phrase := 'Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit'.
newPhrase := phrase substrings.
phrase substrings do: [: word | word = 'sit' ifFalse: [ newPhrase := newPhrase allButFirst ] ifTrue: [ ^ nil ] ].
newPhrase joinUsing: String space

it is answering nil when evaluated in a Workspace and however there must be a clever way right?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The code:

phrase substrings do: [: word | word = 'sit' ifFalse: [ ... ] ifTrue: [ ^ nil ] ].

returns nil when the word sit is found.

Note that ^ in Smalltalk always return from the enclosing method. It doesn't break out of the do:.

Try this instead

To discard all words before sit:

words := phrase substrings.
newPhrase := words allButFirst: (words indexOf: 'sit') - 1

You may also find these collection methods interesting:

words copyAfter: 'sit'      "all words after sit"
words copyUpTo: 'sit'       "all words before sit"
words copyUpThrough: 'sit'  "words before and including sit"
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Very useful, thanks! –  user869097 Jul 30 '11 at 6:40

I would go with Alexandre's first answer:

words := phrase substrings.
newPhrase := words copyAfter: 'sit'

It seems more intention revealing (i.e. clear) than either of the following, but just for fun, here's two other ways:

If, after profiling, you wanted more efficiency. This way is 25 times more efficient:

sitStart := phrase findWordStart: 'sit' startingAt: 1.
afterSit := sitStart + 4.
phrase copyFrom: afterSit to: phrase size.

PetitParser: 10 times less efficient, but a great tool to have in your pocket in more complex parsing situations:

sit := 'sit' asParser.
partToKeep := sit negate plus, sit, #any asParser plus flatten trim ==> [ :n | n third ].
partToKeep parse: phrase.

Also, you have to decide what to do if 'sit' is not found.

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Note that #findWordStart:startingAt: doesn't find a word but a word start. i.e. findWordStart: 's' would still find "sit" –  Alexandre Jasmin Jul 29 '11 at 12:10
    
Yes, but you would get a false positive if an earlier word started with $s. E.g. ('Lorem sipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit' findWordStart: 's' startingAt: 1) "Returns 7", but ('Lorem sipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit' findWordStart: 'sit' startingAt: 1) "Returns 20". –  Sean DeNigris Jul 29 '11 at 14:13
1  
Yes. Or if another word started with 'sit' for that matter –  Alexandre Jasmin Jul 29 '11 at 14:20

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