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i have the following methods:

    public  int CountProperty1
    {
        get
        {
            int count = 0;
            foreach (var row in Data)
            {
                count = count + row.Property1;
            }
            return count ;
        }
    }

    public  int CountProperty2
    {
        get
        {
            int count = 0;
            foreach (var row in Data)
            {
                count = count + row.Property2;
            }
            return count ;
        }
    }

what is the best way to avoid duplication here and share as much code as possible

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1  
Can you use LINQ? –  oleksii Jul 29 '11 at 10:14
    
Is it worth mentioning, as an aside, that your implementation is a Sum(), not a Count()? –  Steve Morgan Jul 29 '11 at 10:50
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7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

How about using LINQ and the Sum extension method ?

public int CountProperty1 
{
    get { return Data.Sum(r => r.Property1); }
} 

In case that is not an option, you can refactor out the logic into your own sum method:

public  int CountProperty1
{
    get
    {
        return CountProperty(r => r.Property1);
    }
}

public  int CountProperty2
{
    get
    {
        return CountProperty(r => r.Property2);
    }
}

private int CountProperty(Func<Row,int> countSelector)
{
     int count = 0;
     foreach (var row in Data)
     {
         count = count + countSelector(row);
     }
     return count ;
}

Note about the last example: I made up the "Row" type, as it was not evident from your example. Substitute with the proper type.

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1  
This has the advantage that the code is reduced, and so duplication is not so much of an issue. –  Schroedingers Cat Jul 29 '11 at 10:16
1  
A quick count-up and you'll see that your refactored code has exactly the same number of lines as the original, is more complex and slower in execution. It's not a great example of the benefits of refactoring! (Not including the Data.Sum() recommendation which is excellent) –  Steve Morgan Jul 29 '11 at 10:36
    
@Steve, I would also favour the Sum() solution, I just wanted to provide an example of how it one could refactor such a problem in more general terms - also, there might be more than just two the two example properties in his codebase that looks the same. –  driis Jul 29 '11 at 14:24
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Probably not the answer you are looking for, but this is not necessarily duplication. There is a misunderstanding sometimes that if two different functions happen look the same, they should be refactored to remove the duplicate. In my humble opinion, THIS IS WRONG.

It is only dupliction if they are truly replication and identicial or near-identical concept. For it to be duplication (at least duplication that should be removed), it's not just that they happen to use the same code, but that the use the same code for the same reason.

It may just be because of the sample you posted, but it was simple enough. Despite the fact that the implemention of the two properties was identical, there must be some valid business reason that you have those two properties, otherwise the simplest answer is to remove the second property all together. However, if you really have two properties, and they just happen to look the same now, that doesn't mean they they won't diverge in functionility in the future (and that is OK).

The idea is to minimize complexity and maintenence cost. You can only do that if your code makes sense and models reality, but not if it introduces false comparisons by lumping together things that just happen to look similar.

http://mooneyblog.mmdbsolutions.com/index.php/2010/07/30/reusable-code-is-bad/

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Don't bother.

You can shorten the code, but if you try to refactor it to eliminate the duplication, you're just going to make that code more complicated.

Concentrate your refactoring effort on more complicated and worthy cases. Life's too short...

A few bytes of disk space are cheap in the extreme and Copy/Paste are the developer's best friend. Also, if we're being purist about it, consider the runtime overhead of your refactoring.

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3  
I strongly disagree. While your point might be valid in some cases, this is so obvious a code duplication that can be easily factored out to a simple helper, that it is certainly worth it fighting the duplication. –  driis Jul 29 '11 at 10:20
1  
My point is that the code, while duplicated, is trivial. Your CountProperty method is an order of magnitude more complicated and only a few less lines of code. The trade-off between simplicity and verbosity is not always straightforward. –  Steve Morgan Jul 29 '11 at 10:26
1  
@Steve - I agree with you 100% - however, I would add that IMO these should be methods not properties anyway. –  Barry Kaye Jul 29 '11 at 10:45
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I wouldn't bother with properties personally, just invoke is directly outside using linq

myObject.Data.Sum(x=>x.Property1)
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This exactly, you should replace every call to the CountProperty1 property with Data.Sum(x=>x.Property1) –  Evren Kuzucuoglu Jul 29 '11 at 10:37
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This is fairly clean. If I knew the type of row, I'd be inclined to put PropertyN() into its class rather than here, but lacking that knowledge:

public int CountPropertyN(int n)
{
    int count = 0;
    foreach (var row in Data)
    {
        count = count + PropertyN(row, n)
    }
    return count ;
}

private int PropertyN(var row, int n) 
{
     if (n == 1) return row.Property1;
     else return row.Property2;
}
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give it an input parameter that says which parameter

public  int CountProperty (int whichProperty) 
    {
        get
        {
            int count = 0;
            foreach (var row in Data)
            {
                if( whichProperty = 1)
                    count = count + row.Property1;
                if( whichProperty = 2)
                    count = count + row.Property2;
            }
            return count ;
        }
    }
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Seems more like you are moving the problem rather than solving it... not my down vote though –  musefan Jul 29 '11 at 10:24
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public  int CountProperty1
{
    get
    {
        return GetCount(row.Property1);
    }
}

public  int CountProperty2
{
    get
    {
        return GetCount(row.Property2);
    }
}

private int GetCount(object property)
{
    int count = 0;
    foreach (var row in Data)
    {
        if(property == row.Property1)
        {
            count = count + row.Property1;
        }
        else if (property == row.Property2)
        {
            count = count + row.Property2;
        }
    }
    return count ;
}

in the pribvate method i used object in the signature - until i have a better knowelege of the type needed for property

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