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public class Contact
{
    int i;
    String name;
    public Contact(int iVal, String nameVal)
    {
        i = iVal;
        name = nameVal;
    }
}   

public class MultiMap
{
    public static void main (String args[])
    {
        java.util.HashMap m = new java.util.HashMap();
                Contact m1 = new Contact(1, "name");
        Contact m2 = new Contact(1, "name");
        m.put(m1, "first");
        m.put(m2, "second");
        System.out.println(m.get(m1));
        System.out.println(m.get(m2));
    }
}   

Output is:

first 
second 

How does this "get" method behave ? As both m1 and M2 have same values and I have not overridden hashcode(), will Object class's equals() method be called ?

Is this correct ?

  1. There is no hashcode method so there is no way for the JVM to see if objects m1 and m2 contain different values
  2. There is no equals method overridden so Object class's equals() is invoked and as both objects are different the code above works fine without m2 replacing m1's value.
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7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When the hashCode() and equals(Object o) methods are not overridden by your class, Java just uses the actual reference to the object in memory to calculate the values (ie. check if it is the same instantiation of the class). That is why you still get both results.

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It will use equals and hashcode method of object class to find the value (as Contact does not overide equals and hashcode methods), so yes.

  1. Yes, Java will always see two Contact objects are different as it will use object reference to compare when it using the equals method in object
  2. Yes, as two contact objects have to references.
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All Objects have hashCode() and equals(). When they are not overridden, the default implementations are used. The default behaviour is to treat all objects as different, unless they are the same object.

For comparison, the IdentityHashMap always does this even if you have overridden you hashCode and equals.

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Yes this is correct. Any java object that does not define its own equals and hashcode methods inherit the default equals and hascode methods on java.lang.Object. These default implementation are based on object reference equality and not on logically equality. Since you have called get with the same object reference the object can be returned from the map.

Here is an example that illistrates this further.

java.util.HashMap m = new java.util.HashMap();
Contact m1 = new Contact(1, "name");
Contact m2 = new Contact(1, "name");
m.put(m1, "first");
m.put(m2, "second");
System.out.println(m.get(m1));//first 
System.out.println(m.get(m2));//second
System.out.println(m.get(new Contact(1, "name"));//null - since the new object has a different object reference.
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Though m1 and m2 have the same values they are different object references.

This is correct : There is no hashcode method so there is no way for the JVM to see if objects m1 and m2 contain different values -> So it uses the Object class's hasCode() method to calculate the hashCode value to execute the get(), which return different hash values(obvious).

the second point is also correct: As you have not implemented your own equals(), will consider Object's equals() which returns true only when one object is compared to itself.

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Here in Contact class you did not implement the hashcode() and equals() functions.

When HashMap call these method it will search out for these method in the parent class which is Object in this case.

In this case the object location on the Heap is evaluated instead of the values.

e.g. For two objects o1 and o2

o1.equals(o2) == true only when o1 == o2

hashCode() is a method of Object class. Hash code is an integer representation of an object by JVM. Hash code is system generated and JVM takes the address of the object as the basis (seed) to generate the hash code. Hash codes generated need not be the same for different times of execution.

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Question 1:

There is no hashcode method so there is no way for the JVM to see if objects m1 and m2 contain different values

The Object.hashCode() javadoc partly states:

As much as is reasonably practical, the hashCode method defined by class Object does return distinct integers for distinct objects. (This is typically implemented by converting the internal address of the object into an integer, but this implementation technique is not required by the JavaTM programming language.)

Question 2:

There is no equals method overridden so Object class's equals() is invoked and as both objects are different the code above works fine without m2 replacing m1's value

Since there is no equals() implemented, it checks whether m1's reference and the map's key reference is equal.

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