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I am working with a List<> collection, adding new objects to the collection inside 2 nested loops. There are some 500000 items added to the collection, after the loops finish to execute.

At first, the adition operation runs well, but soon after there can be noticed a decrease in performance, for the last thousands of elements, the delay time is unbearable.

I have tried various tricks (initializing the collection with a certain size - 500000), replacing the List<> with a LinkedList<> collection, but it didnt help too much.

Can you recomend me a tip to solve the problem? I am interesting in changing the structure with a more optimized one - LinkedList<> for instance performs better than List<> with operations such as addition.

Method which updates the list

   private void UpdateForecastList(ConcurrentDictionary<Int32, RegistroSalidaProductoPrevision> prediccion, bool soloMejoresMetodos = true)
   {
        foreach (KeyValuePair<int, RegistroSalidaProductoPrevision> kvp in prediccion)
        {
            KeyValuePair<int, RegistroSalidaProductoPrevision> localKvp = kvp;

            IList<Prediccion> pExistente = prediccionList.Where(p => p.Id == localKvp.Key).ToList();

            Articulo articulo = (articuloList.Where(a => a.Id == localKvp.Key)).First();

            if (pExistente.Count > 0)
            {
                foreach (var p in pExistente)
                {
                    prediccionList.Remove(p);
                }
            }

            if (kvp.Value.Previsiones.Count > 0)
            {
                var previsiones = kvp.Value.Previsiones.Where(prevision => prevision.Value.LPrevision[1] != null).ToList();
                int previsionesCount = previsiones.Count;

                for (int a = 0; a < previsionesCount; a++)
                {
                    var registros = previsiones[a].Value.LPrevision[1].Serie;
                    int c = registros.Count;

                    if (soloMejoresMetodos)
                    {
                        if (localKvp.Value.MejorMetodo != previsiones[a].Key) continue;
                        for (int i = 0; i < c; i++)
                        {
                            var p = new Prediccion()
                                        {
                                            Id = articulo.Id,
                                            Nombre = articulo.Codigo,
                                            Descripcion = articulo.Descripcion,
                                            NombreMetodo =
                                                Utils.SplitStringByCapitals(previsiones[a].Value.NombreMetodo),
                                            Fecha = registros[i].Fecha,
                                            PrediccionArticulo = Math.Round(registros[i].Cantidad, 2),
                                            EsMejorMetodo =
                                                (previsiones[a].Value.NombreMetodo == localKvp.Value.MejorMetodo)
                                                    ? true
                                                    : false
                                        };

                            // This line experiences performance loss
                            prediccionList.Add(p);
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        for (int i = 0; i < c; i++)
                        {
                            prediccionList.Add(new Prediccion()
                                                   {
                                                       Id = articulo.Id,
                                                       Nombre = articulo.Codigo,
                                                       Descripcion = articulo.Descripcion,
                                                       NombreMetodo = previsiones[a].Value.NombreMetodo,
                                                       Fecha = registros[i].Fecha,
                                                       PrediccionArticulo =
                                                           Math.Round(registros[i].Cantidad, 2),
                                                       EsMejorMetodo =
                                                           (previsiones[a].Value.NombreMetodo ==
                                                            localKvp.Value.MejorMetodo)
                                                               ? true
                                                               : false
                                                   });
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            else
            {
                prediccionList.Add(new Prediccion()
                                       {
                                           Id = articulo.Id,
                                           Nombre = articulo.Codigo,
                                           Descripcion = articulo.Descripcion,
                                           NombreMetodo = kvp.Value.ErroresDatos[0].Texto,
                                       });
            }
        }
    }

Small description of the method: - the method reads an object (a concurrent dictionary) and updates a list (in this case a LinkedList) with the forecasts corresponding to a certain article.

The concurrent dictionary object is constantly updated from various threads that access it concurrently.

The list is initialized with null predictions corresponding to all the articles; thus, for instance, if you have 700 articles, in the beginning the list will be populated with 700 blank forecasts.

As the concurent dictionary is updated by one of the computing threads, it raises an event which calls the method mentioned above, which at its turn, updates the list (prediccionList).

The maximum number of records which could be hold in the prediccionList (in this case) is about 500000 records, but the loss in performance could be noticed after adding some 40000 records in the list.

The code might seem a bit rusty, as I have tried various optimizations tricks (replace the foreach'es with for's, calculate the count's outside the loops, replace the List<> object with a LinkedList<> etc.). Finally I reached the conclusion that the part that slows down the execution time is the line "prediccionList.Add(p);".

The objects that are added to the list are instances of the Prediccion class; this object I consider not to be very heacy, it only contains 7 fields.

Memory usage

I attach the result from a memory profiling. The memory used doesnt surpass 256 MB, thus I dont believe the memory should be a problem here.enter image description here

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5  
Could you provide a code sample that reproduces the problem? –  alun Jul 29 '11 at 10:49
1  
Your slowdown probably is not the List. I've had Lists much longer than that without problems. Are your objects memory intensive, or use unmanaged ressources, or something like that? –  Jens Jul 29 '11 at 10:55
1  
The LinkedList is optimized for insertion and will have a constant time to perform that operation. If you are experiencing decreases in performance utilizing that data structure, it is likely being caused by some kind of memory constraint. –  Clayton Jul 29 '11 at 11:03
1  
Although you say it didn't help, using the constructor which accepts a capacity is still excellent advice for a huge list. –  Alex Humphrey Jul 29 '11 at 12:16
1  
Please, post some code. –  xxxxxxxxxadfas Jul 29 '11 at 12:48
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5 Answers

In my experience, the List<T> performance is memory-dependant. It always follows the same pattern, the inserting is fast up to a point, and then the performance sharply drops. On my machine that usually happens when I hit the 1.2G memory mark. I've had the same issue with almost all collections I've tried, so I think it's more of a .net underlying issue than a List<T> issue.

I would recommend to try to reduce the object size of the things you are using 500.000 of (replace longs with ints, etc...) and try then.
But beware, even if you manage it to work fast on your machine, it might be over the threshold of the machine where the app is deployed.

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If the objects that you're adding to the list are of any significant size, you could be suffering from memory constraints.

If your process is 32-bit, you're going to be constrained to 2GB in total before running out of address space, but if it's 64-bit, you could easily exceed the physical memory in the machine and start paging to disk.

How big are your objects?

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know how you calculated 2GB, but um, 32 bit is 4GB. –  xxxxxxxxxadfas Jul 29 '11 at 12:47
4  
32-bit processes are allocated 2GB of the 4GB address space. If processes are 'Large Address Aware', they can access 3GB on 32-bit Windows and 4GB on 64-bit Windows. 64-bit processes on 64-bit Windows can access 8TB. –  Steve Morgan Jul 29 '11 at 12:55
    
thanks! some link to crawl on? –  xxxxxxxxxadfas Jul 29 '11 at 13:02
    
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As your list grows larger, every time when it is expanding, framework is copying its contents to a new list, because of the way how garbage collector works. That is why it becomes slower and slower as it is becoming larger.

Possible solutions (that I can think of) are using a list or array with predefined size that you are sure it wont fill up, or if that is not an option, then using System.Collections.Generic.LinkedList, but as you have already tried that, you may have to implement custom list, single-linked if applicable (LinkedList is double-linked).

To increase chance of getting good answer, you should post code of object you keep in collection, and part where you add items, so we can better understand what is all about.

Also, please take a look at http://www.simple-talk.com/dotnet/performance/the-top-5-.net-memory-management-misconceptions/, I think that it will be of help to you.

UPDATE: Indexing should be cheap operation, but nevertheless, you may try to read previsiones[a] (and registros[i] in nested loop) into local variable on beginning of loop, you will save couple of indexings (x 100000 iterations, could make some difference, if clr is not optimizing this?).

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How about using an array instead of a List? You could initialize it to have an initial size (let's say 500000 elements) and if that's not enough, use Array.Resize to add another 100000. You just have to keep track of the actual number of elements, as the Length property will only give you the number of elements.

Note, however, that the Array.Resize call may also be time consuming, as basically, a new array of the new size will be generated and all elements from the original array will be copied into the new array. You should not call this too often.

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1  
How would that help? How is it different from initializing a List with the appropriate size, as he already does? –  jalf Jul 29 '11 at 10:52
1  
@jalf, i'm not sure on the exact specifics, but List underneath uses an array. I would imagine there is quite a bit of creating new arrays and copy the data across with so many elements involved. I may be completely wrong though :) –  Darren Young Jul 29 '11 at 11:01
    
@jalf, I'd just assume that the implementation for List<> introduces some more overhead than a "plain array". I'm not saying that using Array is faster or better, I'm only suggesting to give it a try and see what happens. –  Thorsten Dittmar Jul 29 '11 at 11:16
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You can use an array which will be faster (but not queriable). I dont know the specifics of your code but you may want to refractor and use a databse. 500000 items will never be fast

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