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I've made simple classes that simulate the classes I have (sorry I had to make up the classes, the usual example databases do not have the structure I wanted to ask about):

public class Animal
{  
    public System.Guid ID { get; set; }
    public string SpeciesName { get; set; }  
    public virtual ICollection<AnimalSpecies> AnimalSpecies { get; set; }
}

Species Fish:

public class Fish 
{     
    public System.Guid ID { get; set; }
    public int Freshwater { get; set; } 
}

Spieces Reptile:

public class Reptile
{     
    public System.Guid ID { get; set; }
    public int LifeExpectancy { get; set; }     
}

AnimalSpecies class:

public class AnimalSpecies
{
    public System.Guid Animal_ID { get; set; }
    public System.Guid Species_ID { get; set; }
    public virtual Animal Animal { get; set; }
} 

Mapping of the AnimalSpecies:

public AnimalSpeciesMap()
{       
    this.HasKey(t => new { t.Animal_ID, t.Spieces_ID });

    this.Property(t => t.Animal_ID)
            .HasDatabaseGeneratedOption(DatabaseGeneratedOption.None);
    this.Property(t => t.Spieces_ID)
            .HasDatabaseGeneratedOption(DatabaseGeneratedOption.None);

    this.ToTable("AnimalSpecies");
    this.Property(t => t.Animal_ID).HasColumnName("Animal_ID");
    this.Property(t => t.Spieces_ID).HasColumnName("Spieces_ID");

    // Relationship between Animal and AnimalSpieces: 
    this.HasRequired(t => t.Animal)
            .WithMany(t => t.AnimalSpecies)
            .HasForeignKey(d => d.Animal_ID);               
}

Since Spieces_ID doesn’t have the foreign key, is there a way to map relationship between AnimalSpecies and Fish/Reptile?

share|improve this question
1  
I don't see any error message or any sample of your current mapping. Why should we help you if you didn't try anything? –  Ladislav Mrnka Jul 29 '11 at 11:43
    
Thank you, I did not post the mapping since I did not think it necessary. I should have explained my question better. Please see my comment to alun's question, that is what I should have asked. –  Minnie Jul 29 '11 at 12:27
    
Who is alun again? –  Yakimych Jul 29 '11 at 16:07
    
It looks like alun has taken off his answer. I should have formulated my question differently: I have trouble with mapping AnimalSpicies table and making relationship between AnimalSpicies and Fish and Reptile table. It is one-to-one relationship, and Spiece_ID is either Fish_ID or Reptile_ID. –  Minnie Jul 29 '11 at 16:17
    
Your question is hard to understand (at least I don't) and I believe that's the reason why here is no answer up to now. What for example does "Since Spieces_ID doesn’t have the foreign key..." mean? And how does the AnimalSpecies class look like? –  Slauma Aug 26 '11 at 18:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think that it's possible to define a mapping where AnimalSpecies.Species_ID participates as the foreign key in two different relationships - one between AnimalSpecies and Fish and a second between AnimalSpecies and Reptile.

For me it looks like your model is missing a Species base class for Fish and Reptile. If you would have such a base class your model could look like this:

public class Animal
{
    public System.Guid ID { get; set; }
    //...
    public virtual ICollection<AnimalSpecies> AnimalSpecies { get; set; }
}

public class Species // I think the base class could also be abstract
{
    public System.Guid ID { get; set; }
    //...
    public virtual ICollection<AnimalSpecies> AnimalSpecies { get; set; }
}

public class Fish : Species
{
    public int Freshwater { get; set; } 
}

public class Reptile : Species
{
    public int LifeExpectancy { get; set; }
}

public class AnimalSpecies
{
    public System.Guid Animal_ID { get; set; }
    public System.Guid Species_ID { get; set; }
    public virtual Animal Animal { get; set; }
    public virtual Species Species { get; set; }
}

And the mapping:

public AnimalSpeciesMap()
{       
    this.HasKey(t => new { t.Animal_ID, t.Spieces_ID });

    this.Property(t => t.Animal_ID)
        .HasDatabaseGeneratedOption(DatabaseGeneratedOption.None);
    this.Property(t => t.Spieces_ID)
        .HasDatabaseGeneratedOption(DatabaseGeneratedOption.None);

    this.ToTable("AnimalSpecies");

    this.HasRequired(t => t.Animal)
        .WithMany(t => t.AnimalSpecies)
        .HasForeignKey(d => d.Animal_ID);               

    this.HasRequired(t => t.Species)
        .WithMany(t => t.AnimalSpecies)
        .HasForeignKey(d => d.Species_ID);               
}

If your AnimalSpecies class does not have other members than the keys and navigation properties you could also remove this class from the model and map a direct many-to-many relationship between Animal and Species (doesn't make sense from domain viewpoint because an animal belongs only to one species, does it?):

public class Animal
{
    public System.Guid ID { get; set; }
    //...
    public virtual ICollection<Species> Species { get; set; }
}

public class Species // I think the base class could also be abstract
{
    public System.Guid ID { get; set; }
    //...
    public virtual ICollection<Animal> Animals { get; set; }
}

public class Fish : Species
{
    public int Freshwater { get; set; } 
}

public class Reptile : Species
{
    public int LifeExpectancy { get; set; }
}

// no AnimalSpecies class anymore

Mapping:

public AnimalMap()
{       
    this.HasMany(a => a.Species)
        .WithMany(s => s.Animals)
        .Map(x =>
        {
            x.MapLeftKey("Animal_ID");
            x.MapRightKey("Species_ID");
            x.ToTable("AnimalSpecies");
        });
}

AnimalSpecies is now a hidden table which is managed by EF for the many-to-many relationship and not exposed in the model.

I am not sure if I understand your question correctly. This is just what came to my mind.

Edit

If you don't specify any special mappings for the derived classes EF will assume TPH (Table-Per-Hierarchy) inheritance which means that all subclasses together with the base class are stored in the same database table, distinguished by a discriminator column.

If you have many derived classes with many properties each the better inheritance strategy might be TPT (Table-Per-Type). In this case you define for each subclass its own table in the mapping:

public FishMap()
{
    this.ToTable("Fishes");
}

public ReptileMap()
{
    this.ToTable("Reptiles");
}

Now every derived class gets its own table and the base class is stored in table "Species". EF will create the appropriate joins in the database when you query for a fish for example:

var result = context.Species.OfType<Fish>()   // Species is DbSet<Species>
    .Where(f => f.Freshwater == 1).ToList();

You can read more about the different inheritance mapping strategies and their benefits and drawbacks here:

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for taking the time to think and come up with the idea to solve my question. You did understand the question perfectly. Your solution would be nice if the number of Species is low. I do have over 20 different Species and each has at least 10 different properties (none in common), this is why each Species (Fish and Reptile) have their tables (Correct me if I'm wrong in reading your code that all Species are in the one Species table and do not have the separate tables). –  Minnie Aug 29 '11 at 13:49
    
@Minnie: See my Edit above. TPT (or perhaps TPC) might be the better option for your model. –  Slauma Aug 29 '11 at 15:43
    
I have completely forgotten that TPH is the default mapping strategy. Thank you for the links, I have Morteza Manavi's articles bookmarked at the top of my EF reading and am coming back at them all the time. Thank you so much for your time, I have to say that you are true inspiration, I'm hoping that I'll learn a fraction of what you know about EF and can be of the help to the others as you are. I have spend so much time reading and unsuccessfully trying to solve my problem. This is the simple and wonderful solution. Thank you so much. –  Minnie Aug 29 '11 at 16:37

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