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I have two queries which are returning different results when I would expect them to return the same results.

The first query returns the correct result. The second returns a result, but it is incorrect.

Why is this and how can I fix the second statement so that it returns the same result? I have to use the HAVING clause in this statement.

1.

    SELECT
        CAST(CONCAT(DATE(`mytable`.`starttime`),' ',HOUR(`mytable`.`starttime`),':',LPAD(60*(MINUTE(`mytable`.`starttime`) DIV 60),2,'0'),':00') AS DATETIME) AS `date`,
        `mytable`.`id`
    FROM
        `mytable`
    WHERE
        `mytable`.`starttime`>='2011-07-01 00:00:00'
        AND `mytable`.`starttime`<='2011-07-01 23:59:59'
        AND `id` BETWEEN 1 AND 100
    GROUP BY
        `mytable`.`id`

2.

    SELECT
        CAST(CONCAT(DATE(`mytable`.`starttime`),' ',HOUR(`mytable`.`starttime`),':',LPAD(60*(MINUTE(`mytable`.`starttime`) DIV 60),2,'0'),':00') AS DATETIME) AS `date`,
        `mytable`.`id`
      FROM
        `mytable`
    WHERE 
        `id` BETWEEN 1 AND 100
    GROUP BY
        `mytable`.`id`
    HAVING `date` IN ('2011-07-01 00:00:00', '2011-07-01 01:00:00', '2011-07-01 02:00:00', '2011-07-01 03:00:00', '2011-07-01 04:00:00', '2011-07-01 05:00:00', '2011-07-01 06:00:00', '2011-07-01 07:00:00', '2011-07-01 08:00:00', '2011-07-01 09:00:00', '2011-07-01 10:00:00', '2011-07-01 11:00:00', '2011-07-01 12:00:00', '2011-07-01 13:00:00', '2011-07-01 14:00:00', '2011-07-01 15:00:00', '2011-07-01 16:00:00', '2011-07-01 17:00:00', '2011-07-01 18:00:00', '2011-07-01 19:00:00', '2011-07-01 20:00:00', '2011-07-01 21:00:00', '2011-07-01 22:00:00', '2011-07-01 23:00:00')

Thanks in advance for any help you can offer.

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is the 2nd query giving less results (thereby being wrong).. you have given specific times in the date condition which could be reducing the result set. –  Anantha Sharma Jul 29 '11 at 11:48
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

WHERE clause is applied before GROUPing while HAVING is applied after. So in your second query where you have GROUP BY with no WHERE clause MySql returns a random (undetermined) single row and then applies the HAVING clause to it.

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Apologies, for the example above I stripped out everything that is identical and I can rule out as the problem, but I stripped too much. I have added a where clause to the second query for completeness. In the real world this is part of a 200 line UNION query returning 6 different resultsets in one view. –  Hadleigh Jul 29 '11 at 12:11
    
Looking at your current queries, your first query returns one row per id with starttime between two given times, your second query returns one undetermined (random) row per id and then checks if its starttime is between given times and if not excludes it from the results. These two give totally different results. –  nobody Jul 29 '11 at 12:27
    
Sorry, I was being thick. Thanks for the additional explanation, that makes perfect sense now. –  Hadleigh Jul 29 '11 at 13:13
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Group by is used with aggregate functions - sum, min, max, count. Your query doesn't appear to have an aggregate in the "select" - so group by doesn't do anything.

Whilst your query may be valid SQL, it doesn't make sense. Not sure if this is why your having clause is going nuts, though.

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Group by in this case ensures that many IDS are reduced to just one, so I can get the number of unique IDS within the date ranges. –  Hadleigh Jul 29 '11 at 12:16
    
I mean, I want to count an id as unique if it occurs in hour 1, but not as unique again if it occurs in hour 2. I only want to record it once, regardless of how many times it occurs. –  Hadleigh Jul 29 '11 at 12:20
    
The problem I am seeing with query 2 is that legitimate unique ids are just not being recorded. So, where query 1 might find 1 id between 16:00 and 17:00, query 2 does not. –  Hadleigh Jul 29 '11 at 12:22
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I assume "id" is a primary key on your table, is that right? I'm guessing that you want to show the times during the day at which various events occurred but I'm not sure why you would group by id then. Could you give an example of how you would like the output to look?

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ID isn't the primary key and there could be many ids. This is part of a bigger query but in essence this should count +1 for the first time it finds a unique ID, then discount it from then on. –  Hadleigh Jul 29 '11 at 12:14
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