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Socket.io's readme contains the following example:

var io = require('socket.io').listen(80);

io.sockets.on('connection', function (socket) {
  socket.join('justin bieber fans');
  socket.broadcast.to('justin bieber fans').emit('new fan');
  io.sockets.in('rammstein fans').emit('new non-fan');
});

What's the difference between socket.broadcast.to() and io.sockets.in()?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 41 down vote accepted

socket.broadcast.to broadcasts to all sockets in the given room, except to the socket on which it was called while io.sockets.in broadcasts to all sockets in the given room.

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in what way a channel is different than a room? –  vsync Jun 11 '13 at 12:22
    
in none. Different name for same thing. –  mike_hornbeck Jun 18 '13 at 14:56
    
socket.io uses the term room instead of channel. rooms/channels are not to be confused with namespaces in socket.io though. I updated my answer to use the correct term. –  Daniel Baulig Jun 25 '13 at 0:25

Node.js was something I was really interested forawhile and I used it in one of my project to make a multiplayer game.

io.sockets.in().emit() and socket.broadcast.to().emit() are the main two emit methods we use in Socket.io's Rooms (https://github.com/LearnBoost/socket.io/wiki/Rooms) Rooms allow simple partitioning of the connected clients. This allows events to be emitted with to subsets of the connected client list, and gives a simple method of managing them.

They allow us to manage the subsets of the connected client list(which we call rooms) and have the similiar functionalities like the main socket.io functions io.sockets.emit() and socket.broadcast.emit().

Anyway I'll try to give the example codes with the comments to explain. See if it helps;

Socket.io Rooms

i) io.sockets.in().emit();

/* Send message to the room1. It broadcasts the data to all 
   the socket clients which are connected to the room1 */

io.sockets.in('room1').emit('function', {foo:bar});

ii) socket.broadcast.to().emit();

io.sockets.on('connection', function (socket) {
    socket.on('function', function(data){

        /* Broadcast to room1 except the sender. In other word, 
            It broadcast all the socket clients which are connected 
            to the room1 except the sender */
        socket.broadcast.to('room1').emit('function', {foo:bar});

    }
}

Socket.io

i) io.sockets.emit();

/* Send message to all. It broadcasts the data to all 
   the socket clients which are connected to the server; */

io.sockets.emit('function', {foo:bar});

ii) socket.broadcast.emit();

io.sockets.on('connection', function (socket) {
    socket.on('function', function(data){

        // Broadcast to all the socket clients except the sender
        socket.broadcast.emit('function', {foo:bar}); 

    }
}

Cheers

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In Socket.IO 1.0, .to() and .in() are the same. And others in the room will receive the message. The client sends it won't receive the message.

Check out source code (v1.0.6):

https://github.com/Automattic/socket.io/blob/a40068b5f328fe50a2cd1e54c681be792d89a595/lib/socket.js#L173

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