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Is there any reason why you would create locks around the getter and setter of a boolean property like this?

  private _lockObject = new object();
  private bool _myFlag;
  public bool MyFlag
  {
    get
    {
      lock (_lockObject)
      {
        return _myFlag;
      }
    }
    set
    {
      lock (_lockObject)
      {
        _myFlag = value;
      }
    }
  }
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+1 for being a school book example –  JK. Jul 29 '11 at 14:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Well, you don't need locks necessarily - but if you want one thread to definitely read the value that another thread has written, you either need locks or a volatile variable.

I've personally given up trying to understand the precise meaning of volatile. I try to avoid writing my own lock-free code, instead relying on experts who really understand the memory model.

EDIT: As an example of the kind of problem this can cause, consider this code:

using System;
using System.Threading;

public class Test
{
    private static bool stop = false;

    private bool Stop
    {
        get { return stop; }
        set { stop = value; }
    }

    private static void Main()
    {
        Thread t = new Thread(DoWork);
        t.Start();
        Thread.Sleep(1000); // Let it get started
        Console.WriteLine("Setting stop flag");
        Stop = true;
        Console.WriteLine("Set");
        t.Join();
    }

    private static void DoWork()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Tight looping...");
        while (!Stop)
        {
        }
        Console.WriteLine("Done.");
    }
}

That program may or may not terminate. I've seen both happen. There's no guarantee that the "reading" thread will actually read from main memory - it can put the initial value of stop into a register and just keep using that forever. I've seen that happen, in reality. It doesn't happen on my current machines, but it may do on my next.

Putting locks within the property getter/setter as per the code in the question would make this code correct and its behaviour predictable.

For more on this, see this blog post by Eric Lippert.

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2  
Hi Jon, thanks for the great response. I found this article which elaborates on your post nicely... igoro.com/archive/volatile-keyword-in-c-memory-model-explained –  Noob Jul 31 '11 at 11:02

Reads and writes of bool are atomic.

However the name "flag" indicates that separate threads will be reading/writing until some condition occurred. To avoid unexpected behavior due to optimization you should consider adding the volatile keyword to you bool declaration.

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Atomic isn't necessarily enough though. –  Jon Skeet Jul 29 '11 at 13:39

There's no reason to have a lock right there.

Taking a lock may well be appropriate in your design, but it's very doubtful that this is the right granularity.

You need to make your design thread-safe, not individual properties (or even entire objects).

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How do you know there's no reason to have a lock? We don't have any more context. That flag may be all that's required to indicate the a task is "done" for example - and while there are alternatives to locks, simply removing the lock may well cause working code to break. See my code for an example. –  Jon Skeet Jul 29 '11 at 13:49
    
@Jon: You'd want to put the lock around the entirety of reporting the task results, not just one property accessor. (In any non-trivial design.) Your example uses the lock as a very expensive memory fence. –  Ben Voigt Jul 29 '11 at 14:55
1  
Yes, but there has to be a memory fence of some description, and a lock is one way of getting that fence. There may well be better ways of achieving the same thing, but your first sentence could be interpreted as "any program which is correct with the locks would also be correct without the locks" - and that's simply untrue. –  Jon Skeet Jul 29 '11 at 14:58
    
@Jon: Reading only the first sentence of my answer would be unwise. That's frequently true. While you have given an example where a lock in the property accessor provides a needed memory fence, in probably 99.9% of property accesses from multiple threads, some other action should be done under the same lock, and without releasing the lock in between. Even when that isn't the case, taking a lock inside a property accessor violates the principle that properties act like variables. –  Ben Voigt Jul 29 '11 at 17:41
1  
Maybe - but maybe not. But given that the question is "Is there any reason why you would..." the answer is yes. There is a reason why you would, in at least some cases. It's not definitely-pointless code, as I maintain your answer implies. –  Jon Skeet Jul 29 '11 at 18:40

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