Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I cannot get this simple piece of code to compile without including the TestClass.cpp file explicitly in my main.cpp file. What am I doing wrong? Thanks in advance!

Here is the code:

TestClass.h

#ifndef TESTCLASS_H_
#define TESTCLASS_H_

class TestClass
{
    public:
	    static int foo();
};

#endif

TestClass.cpp

#include "TestClass.h"

int TestClass::foo() { return 42; }

main.cpp

#include <iostream>

#include "TestClass.h"

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << TestClass::foo() << endl;

    return 0;
}

Here is the error:

g++ main.cpp -o main.app /tmp/ccCjOhpy.o: In function main': main.cpp:(.text+0x18e): undefined reference to TestClass::foo()' collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Include TestClass.cpp into the commandline, so the linker can find the function definition:

g++ main.cpp TestClass.cpp -o main.app

Alternatively, compile each to their own object file, then tell the compiler to link them together (it will forward them to the linker)

g++ -c main.cpp -o main.o
g++ -c TestClass.cpp -o TestClass.o
g++ main.o TestClass.o -o main.app
share|improve this answer
    
How strange! I have never encountered this problem before. I am new to C++ and I think I have always had an IDE do this for me. No wonder! Thanks! –  Scott Mar 26 '09 at 20:31
1  
@Scott - This is why you should spend some time in command line ;). It make clear things IDE hides from you... –  Darius Kucinskas Mar 26 '09 at 20:42
    
I have to disagree with renaming the files. As it is, the files are named after what they contain, consistent with the case of the contents (function "main" and class "TestCase"). –  camh Mar 26 '09 at 22:04
    
i agree. that would be consistent too. i will change my answer. good catch –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 26 '09 at 22:32

You're not compiling and linking against TestClass.cpp (where the implementation of foo() is). The compiler is thus complaining that your trying to use an undefined function.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.