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I'm new to SQL, so I apologize if this is a dumb question.

When do I need to use the brackets '[' and ']' around schema and table names? Could I just use them always?

Now, suppose I did the following to create a table

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[table1] ([ID] VARCHAR(5))

This worked. I verified it by running a select statement. Suppose time goes on and I added a bunch of rows. Now if I want remove all the rows, should I be using delete or truncate? It seems I should be doing this

TRUNCATE [dbo].[table1]

But I keep getting incorrect syntax near 'dbo' or incorrect syntax near keyword TRUNCATE when I do this via jtds jdbc driver.

What am I missing with the syntax?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
TRUNCATE [dbo].[table1]

should be

TRUNCATE TABLE [dbo].[table1]

brackets are used to allow for invalid column names like then ones that start with a number or have spaces in them

example

CREATE TABLE [ ]([ ] INT)
INSERT [ ] VALUES(1)

SELECT [ ] FROM [ ]

you can always use brackets, they are not required but guard against problematic column names

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Sorry for the late acceptance. I meant to accept this when you first posted your answer, but I had to wait and simply forgot :) –  Kizaru Sep 11 '11 at 22:31

I think you wanted TRUNCATE TABLE ... there is no TRUNCATE on its own.

TRUNCATE TABLE [dbo].[table1];
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The [] are required around table and column names that are reserved words, or include spaces. MS tends to put them around everything, but most of the time they are not necessary.

And as Aaron said, you want TRUNCATE TABLE.

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Actually, there are many cases where MS doesn't bother putting them there (certain scripting options or other SSMS functionality), and many cases where they can't handle special characters because they don't escape them correctly before executing code. When I write scripts for people that pull metadata I always put QUOTENAME() around everything so that no poorly-named columns or objects slip through. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 29 '11 at 15:15

In answer to the fist part of your question:

When do I need to use the brackets '[' and ']' around schema and table names? Could I just use them always?

Use brackets when the names clash with SQL keywords (usually you can see this by the colours in your IDE) and Yes - you can always use them.

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Truncate Table and Delete From are not the same though they often appear to do the same thing.

Truncate Table requires some heightened permissions and Truncate Table "Removes all rows from a table without logging the individual row deletions. TRUNCATE TABLE is similar to the DELETE statement with no WHERE clause; however, TRUNCATE TABLE is faster and uses fewer system and transaction log resources."

This means that Truncate always removes all of the rows in a table and cannot be rolled back as part of a transaction.

Delete From is almost always what you want to do as part of transactional processing. Truncate Table is appropriate while developing and testing as a standalone, adhoc command. If you feel an urge to put Truncate Table in a stored procedure, check yourself and see if Delete might be more appropriate.

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2  
This means that Truncate always removes all of the rows in a table and cannot be rolled back as part of a transaction. that is am myth, see here: sqlblog.com/blogs/denis_gobo/archive/2007/06/13/1458.aspx –  SQLMenace Jul 29 '11 at 15:27
    
Another difference is that TRUNCATE TABLE re-seeds IDENTITY columns but DELETE does not. But as Denis stated your assumption about rollback is incorrect. –  Aaron Bertrand Jul 29 '11 at 15:57
    
and if you have a fk constraint you also can't do a truncate –  SQLMenace Jul 29 '11 at 16:04

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