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I am trying to use hash references to pass information to sub-routines. Psuedo code:

sub output_detail {
    Here I want to be able to access each record by the key name (ex. "first", "second", etc)
}

sub output_records {
    I want to use a foreach to pass each record has reference to another sub-routine
    that handles each record.

    foreach $key ( sort( keys %someting) ) {
        output_detail(something);
    }
}

%records = ();

while ($recnum, $first, $second, $third) = db_read($handle)) {
    my %rec = ("first"=>$first, "second"=>$second, "third=>$third);
    my $id = $recnum;
    $records{$id} = \%rec;
}

output_records(\%records);

I'm not sure how to de-reference the hashes when passed to a sub-routine. Any ideas would be very helpful.

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

Use -> to access keys of a hash ref. So, your argument to output_records will come through as a scalar hash ref.

sub output_records {
    my $records = shift;
    my $first = $records->{"first"};
}

See perlreftut for more info.

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OK. Using your sample code I was able to play around with my code and get it to work! The problem is I wasn't using the '->' de-reference arrow correctly. –  llihttocs Jul 29 '11 at 16:12
    
Here is a snippet of the working code (sub-routines only) –  llihttocs Jul 29 '11 at 16:14
    
Sorry! I keep hitting the return key! I'm not sure how to move down a line without hitting the Enter key. Anyway, here it is. 'sub output_detail { my ($outrec) = @_; print $outrec->{'first'}; print $outrec->{'second'}; print $outrec->{'third'}; } sub output_records { my ($outrecsref) = @_; foreach $key ( sort (keys %$outrecsref) ) { output_detail($outrecsref->{$key}); } }' –  llihttocs Jul 29 '11 at 16:16
    
I am truly sorry about these comments. Let me try it again. sub output_detail { my ($outrec) = @_; print $outrec->{'first'}; print $outrec->{'second'}; print $outrec->{'third'}; } sub output_records { my ($outrecsref) = @_; foreach $key ( sort (keys %$outrecsref) ) { output_detail($outrecsref->{$key}); } } –  llihttocs Jul 29 '11 at 16:18
    
Oh well! Hopefully you haven't contracted a headache by now. –  llihttocs Jul 29 '11 at 16:19
sub output_detail {
    my $hash = shift;
    my $value = $$hash{some_key};
}

sub output_records {
    my $hash = shift;

    foreach my $key (sort keys %$hash) {
        output_detail($hash, $key);  
        # or just pass `$$hash{$key}` if you only need the value
    }
}
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1  
I'm so used to using $hash->{some_key} that your example comes as a bit of a surprise. Is there any practical difference between $$hash{some_key} and $hash->{some_key}? –  Zaid Jul 29 '11 at 16:25
1  
$$hash{key} and $hash->{key} are exactly the same. Doubled sigil dereferencing of elements uses the same structure as full %$hash and slice @$hash{qw/a b/} dereferencing, and is one character shorter, so it is always my preference. A corollary to that is that I prefer to only use -> to mean "call" as in $obj->method or $obj->(...) –  Eric Strom Jul 29 '11 at 18:09

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