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I have created a value object MarketVO and two instances of this value object have same elements and same value for each element.

My value object class is:

public class MarketVO {

    private double floatAmt;
    private Date marketDate;
    private long marketCap;
}

Here are the values:

returnedData:

FloatAmt: 247657.5418618201, MarketCap: 5249164,
MarketDate: 2011-07-29 00:00:00.0 

expectedData:

FloatAmt: 247657.5418618201, MarketCap: 5249164, 
MarketDate: 2011-07-29 00:00:00.0

Now in my unit test class, I want to assert that my returned and expected type is same containing same value in same order so am doing something like

assertTrue(returnedData.equals(expectedData)), now this is returning false value but if I do

assertEquals(testObject.getfloatAmt(), testObject2.getfloatAmt());
assertEquals(testObject.getmarketCap(), testObject2.getmarketCap());
assertEquals(testObject.getmarketDate(), testObject2.getmarketDate());

this test passes and so am not sure as to why .equals method is not working in here? Any suggestions?

Update: I want to put emphasize here that we are using this for doing Unit Testing.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The default implementation of .equals compares object references, not object content.

You probably want to override the equals (and hashCode) methods. Something like this:

public class MarketVO {

    private double floatAmt;
    private Date marketDate;
    private long marketCap;

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (!(o instanceof MarketVO))
            return false;
        MarketVO other = (MarketVO) o;
        return other.floatAmt == floatAmt &&
               other.marketDate.equals(marketDate) &&
               other.marketCap == marketCap;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        ...
    }
}
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so now is there a way to compare two object contains without comparing on getFuncs because my vo has many properties and it's very hard to have assert on getFunc for 10 or 15 fields, any suggestions. –  Rachel Jul 29 '11 at 19:21
    
You could probably do some hack with reflection, or use a Map for your attributes, but overriding equals like above is probably the most common solution. –  aioobe Jul 29 '11 at 19:23
2  
I know you didn't just create an equals method without implementing a hashcode(). Tell me this isn't true. –  Amir Raminfar Jul 29 '11 at 19:23
    
hmm...am just trying to see if there is any other way out, now in my test class MarketVO is not the only VO but i am having 3 different VO's in there and so coupling marketVO in equal method is something that I am not comfortable with. –  Rachel Jul 29 '11 at 19:25
    
in your code why are doing compare with == for floatAmt and marketCap and with .equals on marketDate? –  Rachel Jul 29 '11 at 19:40

Use rather the org.apache.commons library which gives you sophisticated ways implement those valuable methods well. The same library also contains ToStringBuilder which is very handy too.

Maven dependency => commons-lang3 (org.apache.commons)

class WhatEver{
...

   @Override
   public int hashCode() {
       return HashCodeBuilder.reflectionHashCode(this, false);
   }


   @Override
   public boolean equals(Object obj) {
       return EqualsBuilder.reflectionEquals(this, obj, false);
   }

...
}
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The equals method doesn't work as you didn't override it for your required behaviour. The default behaviour on Object (which your class inherits from) is to compare references. Two different instances have different references, thus the equals fails.

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Override, not overload in this case. (Overloading it would have worked too, I guess, but it would be odd to overload without overriding.) –  Jon Skeet Jul 29 '11 at 19:20
    
obviously. changed. –  Femaref Jul 29 '11 at 19:21
    
can you give an example of this? –  Rachel Jul 29 '11 at 19:22
    
@Jon - Can you provide and example keeping unit test scenario in mind? –  Rachel Jul 29 '11 at 21:35
    
@Rachel: No, I was only commenting on the use of terminology. I don't have time to write anything else right now. –  Jon Skeet Jul 29 '11 at 22:10

By default .equals() checks identity and not equality. Change and add this code to your class

 @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if(this == o) {
            return true;
        }
        if(o == null || getClass() != o.getClass()) {
            return false;
        }

        MarketVO marketVO = (MarketVO) o;

        if(Double.compare(marketVO.floatAmt, floatAmt) != 0) {
            return false;
        }
        if(marketCap != marketVO.marketCap) {
            return false;
        }
        if(marketDate != null ? !marketDate.equals(marketVO.marketDate) : marketVO.marketDate != null) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        int result;
        long temp;
        temp = floatAmt != +0.0d ? Double.doubleToLongBits(floatAmt) : 0L;
        result = (int) (temp ^ (temp >>> 32));
        result = 31 * result + (marketDate != null ? marketDate.hashCode() : 0);
        result = 31 * result + (int) (marketCap ^ (marketCap >>> 32));
        return result;
    }
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I highly recommend using Lombok annotation @EqualsAndHashcode, it really helps to avoid bugs with equals and hashCode methods.

It creates equals and hashCode methods using all non-static non-transient fields by default, but you can specify other behaviors like excluding some fields:

@EqualsAndHashCode(exclude={"fieldsThat", "dontMather"})

or including only some fields:

@EqualsAndHashCode(of={"onlyFields", "thatMather"})
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the hashes are different because they are different instances

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1  
hashes and hashcode have nothing to do with this. They make sense only in hashtables. –  Vineet Reynolds Jul 29 '11 at 19:21

More precisely the default behaviour is to compare object's addresses in memory (true if the references point to the exactly same object (address) in memory). So override these methods the get the required behaviour.

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You don't want to f*** with equals, unless you really need to and you know what you are doing. And in that case it's true that you need to override hash also.

Alternative would be to just implement compareTo. For example:

import java.util.Date;

public class MarketVO implements Comparable<MarketVO> {
    private double _amount;
    private Date _marketDate;
    private long _marketCap;

    @Override
    public int compareTo(MarketVO that) {
        final int EQUAL = 0;
        int result;

        result = Double.compare(this._amount, that._amount);
        if (result != EQUAL)
            return result;

        //other compares
        return EQUAL;
    }
}

To test if elements are equal use :

assertTrue(returnedData.compareTo(expectedData)==0);

As an added bonus now collection of this class is also sortable.

share|improve this answer
    
ok instead of making changes to VO can i do something in my unit test class only, may be i can have comparator in there? –  Rachel Jul 29 '11 at 19:53
    
@Rachel That would defeat the purpose of using it, but yes. You can do pretty much anything, if you have time and patience. –  Margus Jul 29 '11 at 20:12

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