Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to dynamically reference the :NEW/OLD pseudo records, or copy them?

I'm doing a audit trigger for a very wide table, so would like to avoid having separate triggers for insert/delete/update.

When updating/inserting I want to record the :NEW values in the audit table, when deleting I want to record the :OLD values.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could try:

declare
  l_deleting_ind varchar2(1) := case when DELETING then 'Y' end;
begin
  insert into audit_table (col1, col2)
  values
   ( CASE WHEN l_deleting_ind = 'Y' THEN :OLD.col1 ELSE :NEW.col1 END
   , CASE WHEN l_deleting_ind = 'Y' THEN :OLD.col2 ELSE :NEW.col2 END
   );
end;

I found that the variable was required - you can't access DELETING directly in the insert statement.

share|improve this answer

WOW, You want to have only ONE insert in your trigger to avoid what?

*"I have a single insert statement INSERT INTO HIST ( EMP_ID, NAME ) VALUES (:NEW.EMP_ID , :NEW.NAME ) ; when deleting though, I want to use :OLD , not not have a seperate insert statement for that. "*

It's a wide table. SO? It's not like there no REPLACE in text editors, you're not going to write the Insert again, just copy, paste, select, replace :NEW with :OLD.

Tony does have a solution but I seriously doubt that performs better than 2 inserts would perform.

What's the big deal?


EDIT

the main thing I'm trying to avoid is having to managed 2 inserts when the table changes. – Matthew Watson

I battle this attitude all the time. Those who write Java or C++ or .Net have a built-in RBO... Do this, this is good. Don't do that, that's bad. They write code according to these rules and that's fine. The problem is when these rules are applied to databases. Databases don't behave the same way code does.

In the code world, having essentially the same code in two "places" is bad. We avoid it. One would abstract that code to a function and call it from the two places and thus avoid maintaining it twice, and possibly missing one, etc. We all know the drill.

In this case, while it's true that in the end I recommend two inserts, they are separated by an ELSE. You won't change one and forget the other one. IT'S Right There. It's not in a different package, or in some compiled code, or even somewhere else in the same trigger. They're right beside each other, there's an ELSE and the Insert is repeated with :NEW, instead of :OLD. Why am I so crazed about this? Does it really make a difference here? I know two inserts won't be worse than other ideas, and it could be better.

The real reason is being prepared for the times when it does matter. If you're avoiding two inserts just for the sake of maintenance, you're going to miss the times when this makes a HUGE difference.

INSERT INTO log
SELECT * FROM myTable 
WHERE flag = 'TRUE'

ELSE                          -- column omitted for clarity

INSERT INTO log
SELECT * FROM myTable 
WHERE flag = 'FALSE'

Some, including Matthew, would say this is bad code, there are two inserts. I could easily replace 'TRUE' and 'FALSE' with a bind variable and flip it at will. And that's what most people would do. But if True is .1% of the values and 99.9% is False, you want two inserts, because you want two execution plans. One is better off with an index and the other an FTS. So, yes, you do have two Inserts to maintain. That's not always bad and in this case it's good and desirable.

share|improve this answer
    
the main thing I'm trying to avoid is having to managed 2 inserts when the table changes. –  Matthew Watson Mar 29 '09 at 8:53
    
response inline with EDIT. –  Mark Brady Mar 30 '09 at 15:59

create or replace trigger audit_tgr before insert or update or delete on 'table_name'

for each row
 begin
  if (inserting or updating) then
   insert into audit table (a,b,c) values(:new.a,:new.b,:new.c);
  else
   insert into audit table (a,b,c) values(:old.a,:old.b,:old.c);
end;
share|improve this answer

You can use a compound trigger and programmatically check if it us I/U/D.

Compound Triggers

Regards K

share|improve this answer
    
That is what I'm doing, but I'm trying to avoid having multiple insert statements within the trigger. –  Matthew Watson Mar 27 '09 at 0:24
    
I'm not sure I follow, are you doing something like this? CREATE OR REPLACE TRIGGER TRG BEFORE INSERT OR UPDATE OR DELETE ON TBL BEGIN IF INSERTING THEN ...(record :new) ELSEIF UPDATING THEN ...(record :new) ELSEIF DELETING THEN ...(record :old) END IF; ? –  Khb Mar 27 '09 at 0:30
    
I have a single insert statement INSERT INTO HIST ( EMP_ID, NAME ) VALUES (:NEW.EMP_ID , :NEW.NAME ) ; when deleting though, I want to use :OLD , not not have a seperate insert statement for that. –  Matthew Watson Mar 27 '09 at 0:34
    
The the answer is no. You can't say VALUES ( DECODE(DELETING, TRUE, :OLD, :NEW).EMP_ID –  Mark Brady Mar 27 '09 at 19:01

Why don't you use Oracle's built in standard or fine-grained auditing?

share|improve this answer
    
Standard Edition. –  Matthew Watson Mar 27 '09 at 0:23

Use a compound trigger, as others have suggested. Save the old or new values, as appropriate, to variables, and use the variables in your insert statement:

declare
  v_col1  table_name.col1%type;
  v_col2  table_name.col2%type;
begin
  if deleting then
    v_col1 := :old.col1;
    v_col2 := :old.col2;
  else
    v_col1 := :new.col1;
    v_col2 := :new.col2;
  end if;

  insert into audit_table(col1, col2)
  values(v_col1, v_col2);
end;
share|improve this answer
    
mm, yeh, was hoping to be able to just copy the record. oh well. thanks –  Matthew Watson Mar 29 '09 at 8:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.