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There are many questions on this site about return value optimization (I suppose it's a fairly confusing topic), but I can't seem to find one that answers my particular question. If I have code that looks like this:

returnType function() { stuff....}

void someOtherFunction()
{
    returnType var = function();
    more stuff...
}

I am told that the compiler may decide to not use two instances of returnType in someOtherFunction(). Logically, I would expect that function() would generate an object of type returnType, and someOtherFunction() would receive that value via copy constructor (overloaded or not) into a temporary value. I would then expect that temporary value to be copied via assignment (which could be overloaded and in theory could have any kind of functionality!) into var, which would have previously been initialized via the default constructor.

I see a potential issue here. What happens if there is not this temporary copy of returnType in someOtherFunction()? Wouldn't var have to be filled, via copy constructor, with the returned value from function() directly? If so, wouldn't the assignment operator never be called? If so, and if the assignment operator were overloaded, couldn't that change the functionality of the program? If so, does that mean that it's the programmer's responsibility to ensure that = always does the same thing as a copy constructor? And I hate to run this long chain of questions, but if so, why does C++ allow you to define copy constructors to do something other than assignment?

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If copying your objects via operator= works but copy-constructors don't (or at least doesn't have the same semantics), you got a problem anyway. –  delnan Jul 29 '11 at 22:05
2  
C++ allows you to shoot yourself in the foot in several ways. Being able to make assignment operators do weird things is just one of them. –  Praetorian Jul 29 '11 at 22:09
    
Assignment and copy construction are special operations. If they aren't implemented properly and as expected then your program will explode. –  Zan Lynx Jul 29 '11 at 22:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I would then expect that temporary value to be copied via assignment (which could be overloaded and in theory could have any kind of functionality!) into var, which would have previously been initialized via the default constructor.

Well, for starters, that's quite wrong.

int x = 0;
int x(0);

Those two lines are the same thing- a constructor call. There are some differences- the first cannot call explicit constructors, I believe- but they are the same function call. There is no default construction and no assignment operator call. They are both direct constructions.

Basically, the Standard says "If you do something other than copying an object in the copy constructor, it's your own dumb fault and I laugh as your program doesn't exhibit the expected behaviour when the optimizer eliminates the calls". Those are my own paraphrased words, of course, but the Standard is very explicit on the optimizer being allowed to eliminate copies. In C++0x then this applies to moves too.

Your code fragment above is really

returnType function() { stuff....}

void someOtherFunction()
{
    returnType var(function());
    more stuff...
}

That isn't the optimized version, that's what it really is. The assignment operator is never called. And with NRVO, it looks something like

void function(void* mem) { // construct return value into mem
    new (mem) returnType;
    // Do shiz with returnType;
}
void someOtherFunction() {
    // This doesn't respect some other things like alignment
    // but it's the basic idea
    char someMemory[sizeof(returnType)];
    function(someMemory);
    // more stuff here
}

Of course, the compiler also has to deal with destructing the object even in the case of an exception, and making sure all aliases are of the correct type, and alignment, and some other things I didn't deal with in my sample, but hopefully you get the general gist.

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4  
T var = something requires T to have a non-explicit constructor as well as a visible copy constructor. –  Praetorian Jul 29 '11 at 22:12
    
Let's suppose, just as an academic exercise, that I've put some kind of crazy functionality into the = operator overloading function, but not into the copy constructor. Are you saying that if I write returnType = function(), the code in the = operator function might never be executed because the compiler might do returnType var(function()) instead? But, furthermore, whether this is actually done depends on the compiler and optimization options? Do I understand that right? –  Gravity Jul 29 '11 at 23:33
1  
@Gravity: Despite appearances, the syntax Type x = y; is not an assignment. –  FredOverflow Jul 30 '11 at 4:55
    
@Gravity: The assignment operator is never called. It is defined in the Standard that it is a constructor call and not an assignment. The copy constructor itself exhibits the might-be-executed behaviour you describe- depending on the compiler, optimization levels, and the details of the function you're calling, it might never be executed either.# –  Puppy Jul 30 '11 at 8:51
    
So...what is an assignment then? If I put peculiar functionality inside an overloaded =, when will it get executed? Is it when I say x = y; as opposed to Type x = y? –  Gravity Jul 31 '11 at 4:54

To answer your last few questions:

... if the assignment operator were overloaded, couldn't that change the functionality of the program? If so, does that mean that it's the programmer's responsibility to ensure that = always does the same thing as a copy constructor? And I hate to run this long chain of questions, but if so, why does C++ allow you to define copy constructors to do something other than assignment?

Yes, the assignment operator can in fact change the functionality of the program. But it's totally possible for the assignment operator to do something different from the copy constructor and yet still have the same observable behavior. For example, for a String class I may define the assignment operator in terms of the copy constructor:

class String
{
public:
    String(const wchar_t* str) : buffer(str) {}
    String(const String& rhs) : buffer(rhs.buffer) {}

    String& operator=(String rhs) // copy-and-swap idiom
    {
         Swap(rhs);
         return *this;
    }

    // ...

    void Swap(String& rhs)
    {
        buffer.Swap(rhs.buffer);
    }

private:
    // StringBuffer is an RAII wrapper for a string character array
    // allocated on the free store
    StringBuffer buffer;
};

In the above code, the copy-constructor and assignment operator do essentially the same thing. But if the receiving String has enough memory to hold the source string, it's rather wasteful to throw it away instead of simply overwriting the existing contents.

String& operator=(const String& rhs)
{
    // We don't have enough room to hold the source string.
    // Copy over to a new, bigger buffer.
    if(rhs.buffer.Length() > buffer.Length())
    {
        String temp(rhs);
        Swap(temp);
        // temp holds our old buffer now, and will be destroyed
        // when we exit this scope thanks to RAII.
    }
    else
    {
        // Instead of throwing away our existing buffer and having
        // to allocate a new one, let's just overwrite what we
        // have since our buffer is big enough.
    }
}

Clearly, assigning to a String involves completely different code from copy-constructing a String, but yet still have the same observable behavior (now we have two legitimate copies of the string). The difference is that this more complicated String assignment operator can avoid having to do more memory allocations than necessary.

If the C++ language forced you to make the copy-constructor and assignment operator do the exact same thing, I would not be able to make this kind of optimization. Yes, I am responsible for making sure the copy-constructor and assignment operator do what you think it does, but that's true for all other operators/special member functions anyway.

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So it's for optimization...that actually makes a whole lot of sense. Does the standard require that the effect of using a copy constructor be the same as the effect of assignment? And a somewhat side question: is it OK to use the overloaded = inside a copy constructor (as in *this = objectBeingCopied)? –  Gravity Jul 29 '11 at 23:27

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