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This is a much simplified repro which illustrates how class Predicate delcared outside main() works but when the exact code appears inline as class InlinePredicate the compiler can't match std::sort. The strange thing is that you can pass anything as the third argument to std::sort (say, integer 7) and you'll just get a compile error when it does not support the operator () that sort expects. But when I pass pred2 below it doesn't match at all:

#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

class Predicate {
public:
    bool operator () (const pair<string,int>& a, const pair<string,int>& b)
    {
        return a.second < b.second;
    }
};

int
main()
{
    vector<pair<string, int> > a;

    Predicate pred;
    sort(a.begin(), a.end(), pred);

    class InlinePredicate {
    public:
        bool operator () (const pair<string,int>& a, const pair<string,int>& b)
        {
            return a.second < b.second;
        }
    } pred2;
    sort(a.begin(), a.end(), pred2);

    return 0;
}

repro.cc: In function ‘int main()’:

repro.cc:30: error: no matching function for call to ‘sort(__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator, std::allocator >, int>*, std::vector, std::allocator >, int>, std::allocator, std::allocator >, int> > > >, __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator, std::allocator >, int>*, std::vector, std::allocator >, int>, std::allocator, std::allocator >, int> > > >, main()::InlinePredicate&)’

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1  
As a side note: your operator should probably be const bool operator()(const pair<string,int>& a, const pair<string,int>& b) **const** –  Loki Astari Jul 30 '11 at 0:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In C++03, local classes have no linkage and consequently cannot be used as template arguments (§14.3.1/2).

In C++0x, this limitation has been removed and your code would compile as-is.

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You should probably still make the predicate's operator const, as sort might require that. –  Kerrek SB Jul 29 '11 at 23:50
    
It does compile with g++ -std=c++0x for GCC 4.5 (not 4.3, and I don't have 4.4 handy) –  Ben Jackson Jul 29 '11 at 23:56

In versions of C++ prior to C++0x, classes declared inside functions cannot appear in template parameters. Your invocation of sort implicitly instantiates it with a template parameter set to InlinePredicate, which is illegal.

You may want to consider using either C++0x (with GCC, pass --std=c++0x; in C++0x this code will work as-is, or you can use anonymous functions instead), or boost::lambda. With boost::lambda, it would look like this:

using namespace boost::lambda;

sort(a.begin(), a.end(), _1 < _2);
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1  
Note that as of Boost 1.47, Boost.Lambda is officially deprecated in favor of Boost.Phoenix v3. Consequently, new code would be much better off using Phoenix instead of Lambda (and the syntax you showed for the sort call would remain identical). –  ildjarn Jul 30 '11 at 0:28
    
@ildjarn, oh great, yet another C++03 anonymous function hack to learn... :) –  bdonlan Jul 30 '11 at 0:37
    
But a much more powerful one, definitely worth it. :-] Even in C++0x, I tend to use Phoenix functors over C++0x lambdas about half the time, since they're polymorphic. –  ildjarn Jul 30 '11 at 0:41

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