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Here is my new edited code I am having trouble with my final if loop for the X and O's stored inside an array. I am trying to check if there is an X or O already inside the array or not. If there is one it asks the user for another input then start over again however when i run the program this happens:

1 | 2 | 3
4 | 5 | 6
7 | 8 | 9
Please Enter Box Number: 1
player X your number is 1
X | 2 | 3
4 | 5 | 6
7 | 8 | 9
Please Enter Box Number: 1
Please enter another Number2
player O your number is 1
O | 2 | 3
4 | 5 | 6
7 | 8 | 9
Please Enter Box Number:





char c;


        cout << "Please Enter Box Number: ";
        cin >> c;


        if (c > '9' || c < '0')
        {
            // error message
            cout << "please enter a number 1-9" << " ";
            cin >> c;
            cin.ignore(numeric_limits<int>::max(), '\n');

        }

        if (c < '9' || c > '0') 
        {
            int number = c - '0';

            if (board[number - 1] == 'X' || board[number - 1] == 'O') 
            {
                cout << "Please enter another Number";
                cin >> c;
                cin.ignore(numeric_limits<int>::max(), '\n');

            }
            else if (board[number -1] != 'X' || board[number - 1] != 'O' ) {
                if (player == 'X')
                { 
                    player = 'O';
                }
                else 
                {
                    player = 'X';
                }




                cout << "player " << player <<  " your number is " << number << endl;
                // Your implementation here...



                board[number - 1] = player;

            }


        }







    }
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2  
Think about how to take advantage of the fact that the ASCII values for the characters '0' through '9' are all sequential. That is, something like '8' - '4' will come out to be the actual integer 4. –  Toolbox Jul 30 '11 at 0:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First the second question (the easy one):

Return exits from the current function. So, after the return, no further instruction in your function is executed. You should remove the return and put the rest of the code (that should not be executed if the input is not valid) in the else block of that if.

First question:

  • Why do you check that the index of each position in the array (as in board[7] = '8'). You already know the position, what you need to mark in each cell is the player who uses it; for example set values of 'X' (player 1), 'O' (player 2), ' ' (empty).

  • Instead of nine "if", it will be easier if you convert your input 'c' into an integer and use it as an index. With ASCII characters (I do not know if this still workds with WCHAR, UTF-8 and so on) you could make it quick and dirt:

    int k = c - '0';

    board[k] = player;


Edit: Taking into account checking that the square is not already used:

int k = c - '0';
if (board[k] == ' ') {
  board[k] = player;
} else {
  cout << "This square is already used";
}
share|improve this answer
    
I did not even notice that return statement. Good catch! –  ssell Jul 30 '11 at 0:33
    
@SJuan76 I do not really understand how mark X as player1? –  user868756 Jul 30 '11 at 1:13
    
IMHO if you are representing player X, player O and empty squares, you should only use the chars 'X', 'O' or ' ' to represent the state of each square (not assigning the '1' to '9' to items in the array, but initializing all of them to ' '). See the edit for the code that checks the state of the square before assigning. –  SJuan76 Jul 30 '11 at 15:32

To loop back until a valid value has been entered, you can do something like this:

int number = 10;

while( ( number > 9 ) || ( number < 0 ) )
{
    std::cout << "Please Enter Box Number: ";
    std::cin >> number;
}

std::cout << "Your number is " << number << std::endl;

I am not too sure what you are asking about the other part. I will edit my response if/when I do.

share|improve this answer

http://www.asciitable.com/

if you look at the ascii chart, you will notice that all of the characters have a decimal value to them. So when your teacher subtracts '0' from what the user entered, say '1' he is really doing:

int number = (int)'1' - (int)'0'; // x will equal 1

your array can then be accessed directly using [ ] notation so:

board[number] = player
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Very helpful! –  user868756 Jul 30 '11 at 0:49

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