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I've just begun learning Symfony2 (after using 1.x for the past 2 years) and am kind of put off by how much more typing is required. I know that sounds lazy, but I love the fact that I can quickly get something up and running in 1.x with much less typing. I'm wondering if it's possible to autoload classes without needing to use namespaces. All my attempts to do so (using the PEAR naming scheme) have failed.

If I'm missing something obvious and would be shooting myself in the foot by avoiding using namespaces, I'd appreciate any advice :)

In response to @KingCrunch: I'd like to avoid the namespace and use declarations that seem to be used very frequently in Symfony2 simply to speed up my coding. To be honest, I haven't used namespaces in PHP before. I understand their benefit on paper (and I'm used to using packages in other languages) but I've never run into an issue by not using them in Symfony 1.x projects. This is why I made the "If I'm missing something..." statement above.

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2  
Just curious: Why do you want to use Symfony2 with Symfony1-style? –  KingCrunch Jul 30 '11 at 1:25
1  
Namespaces are featuritis, advocated to solve a mostly fictional problem (name conflicts) and primarily for the benefit of framework authors. You could avoid them by aliasing the namespaced classes, potentially even in a custom autoloader (you need a map for FQNS to unique class names). But it's probably for the best to not fight it. If you want to use SF2, it's not advisable to eschew the regular namespace overhead. Use templates or editor shortcuts. –  mario Jul 30 '11 at 2:28
    
@mario Interesting... I'm just bummed that I need to declare 'use' for every domain object in every controller. –  Arms Jul 30 '11 at 2:47
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to realize that namespaces are not requiring you any more typing than PEAR-style names. Actually they can save up some characters.

See those two examples:

With PEAR-style:

class Foo_Bar_Baz extends Foo_Bar_Parent
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $obj = new Some_Long_Class_Name;
        $obj2 = new Some_Long_Class_Name;
    }
}

With namespaces/use:

namespace Foo\Bar;

use Some\Long\Class\Name;

class Baz extends Class
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $obj = new Name;
        $obj2 = new Name;
    }
}

With namespaces, but no use:

namespace Foo\Bar;

class Baz extends \Foo\Bar\Class
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $obj = new \Some\Long\Class\Name;
        $obj2 = new \Some\Long\Class\Name;
    }
}

As you see, if you use fully qualified class names every time (last example), you just have one more char per class name, the leading \. If you use the use statements and all, then it gets shorter the more you re-use the same class names in one file, or the more classes you use that are in the same namespace.

TL;DR: Anyway, if you're lazy, get an IDE like PhpStorm that will autocomplete all those and add the use statements for you.

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Thanks, your comparison using the PEAR naming scheme drove the point home for me. Namespaces here I come! –  Arms Jul 30 '11 at 22:02
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Short answer: yes, namespaces are a must if you want to use Symfony2.

The reason behind this is that sf2 class autoloader is built on the namespace usage. In theory, you could write your own autoloader and wrap it around sf2, but I think this would be more hassle than using namespace and use ;)

At first I was also bummed by it and didn't really like the way it's used. But once I got used to it and started to see the benefits, it's the other way around. I use sf2 for my own projects and must use sf1.4 at work (not for long, hopefully) and every time I switch from sf2 to sf1.4 I get the "oh, not this again" feeling.

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NS is so complex that you can even make a mistake when trying to explain the benefits to someone:

I know the point of the answer wasn't to get the code "perfect", but still...You forgot to include the use statement for the "Class" class:

namespace Foo\Bar;

use Some\Long\Class\Name;
use The\Extended\Class;
...

This is why namespaces are horrid - only takes forgetting 1 to throw an error; and, even if there is only 1 class named 'Class' in the entire project, PHP has no idea it's there.

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Someone should explain the downvotes for future improvement. –  jhoanna Nov 6 '12 at 1:58
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