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Been messing about with python, as usual it throws my rigid static typed Object Oriented world in to a bit of a mess. Python supports duck typing, has no usable concept of interface based programming (as in C# interfaces) and allows Global variables. With all these goodies is there really any point to a dependency injection container or does the Python run-time become the container.

I understand the point to these containers in static typed OO languages such as Java and C# but where would such a thing fit into the nutty world of python (I love it)?

I have always suspected that Dependency injection as a design pattern was a bad smell that has been created by everything must be a class "Nazi thinking" that is c# and Java, would i be correct or is there something I am missing?

So far I think I can cover factories, Singletons, Multi-instance objects, just by using Globals. I also suspect that the Aspect stuff is covered too, although I am still thinking about this.

The Duck Typing is the thing that is getting me at the moment, so used to defining interfaces then basing classes on these interfaces and letting the static stuff cover my stupidity that I feel that without static typing, containers are a bit useless.

edit

I think I won't be using Dependency Injector frameworks/containers when using python. There really isn't any point. After thinking and reading the responses so far, the argument is made clear that without static type definitions the promises made are so loose that why bother at all. Duck typing is what it is, and the only promise can be made through documentation. As long as the reference comes into the class Method / function through a signiture parameter, and not coming through the ether of the programming environment, then I think I will be safe.

Alarming though is the fact that I can not enforce my will on others through my over bearing design practices as I have done in Java and C#. Do I care......nah :)

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At the risk of getting flamed, I feel like Python fans are far more brainwashed into conformity than Java/.NET folks. DI frameworks like Spring are great, but they aren't part of the language and they aren't mandatory. A brief fling with Django left me feeling dirty. See here. –  jiggy Jul 30 '11 at 3:31
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sorry @jiggy, I read it, but don't see the relevance. I am coming from a c# background (well recent background), done some java in my time and Delphi. I am trying to reassess all my assumptions and learnings using Static languages and seeing how they come up when doing things dynamic. MVC is a talk for another day :) –  WeNeedAnswers Jul 30 '11 at 3:44
    
@Jiggy as for Django, I have no idea about it, I like CherryPy for web stuff. its nice and simple. You can control the MVC to your hearts content. –  WeNeedAnswers Jul 30 '11 at 3:49
    
As for .net, its at the point now where Java was about 6 years ago, floods of frameworks coming out, all claiming to be the latest and greatest and get your work done in half the time. Don't believe the hype. –  WeNeedAnswers Jul 30 '11 at 3:51
    
I was responding to you observation on "Nazi thinking" in the C#/Java community. I intended it as commentary and not an answer to your main question. –  jiggy Jul 30 '11 at 20:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

has no usable concept of interface based programming (as in C# interfaces)

Just because the compiler can't check that you're using the interface correctly doesn't mean there's "no usable concept of interfaces". You document an interface, and write unit tests.

As for globals, it's not like public static methods and fields on C# or Java classes are really any different. Consider how java.lang.Math works, for example. Now consider the fact that java.lang.Math isn't a Singleton. They did that for a good reason.

With all these goodies is there really any point to a dependency injection container

I doubt it, but then I never really saw the point of them in C# or Java, either. Dependency injection is a programming technique, in my view. And there's really not that much to it, either.

I have always suspected that Dependency injection as a design pattern was a bad smell that has been created by everything must be a class "Nazi thinking"

No, it isn't. Dependency injection is a good idea a lot of the time. You don't need a class to inject dependencies into, either. Every time you pass something to a free function as a parameter, instead of having the function call another function to get the information, you're basically doing the same thing: inversion of control. Python also lets you treat modules similarly to classes in a lot of ways (certainly more ways than Java and C# do). There are problems that can be solved by passing modules as parameters to functions. :)

So far I think I can cover factories, Singletons, Multi-instance objects, just by using Globals.

Singletons are the bad smell, if anything. In nearly every case, in my extensive experience, they exist because someone thought it would be Bad(TM) on principle to have a global, without really thinking through the possible options, or why they wanted that kind of access to a single shared object, or even why globals are "Bad(TM) on principle" in the first place.

You could make a global function in Python that acts as a factory. However, I would say it's more Pythonic to do any of the following:

a) first, make really, really, really sure you can't just do what you want with __init__. I mean, in a dynamically typed language, you can do a heck of a lot that way.

b) If __init__ won't cut it, try using __new__ to control the behaviour.

In Python, classes are objects themselves, which are callable. By default, calling them instantiates the class. With __new__, you can hook into that.

c) Use a decorator applied to the class. Here is an example that makes a Singleton (just because):

def _singleton(cls):
  instance = cls()
  result = lambda: instance
  result.__doc__ = cls.__doc__
  return result

@_singleton
class example(object): pass

The way this works: when you decorate the class, _singleton() is called, with the class being passed in. An instance is constructed and cached, and _singleton() returns an anonymous function that will return the instance when called. To complete the charade, the class's documentation is attached to the anonymous function. Then Python rebinds the class' name in the global scope to the returned anonymous function. So when you call it, you get the same instance of the class, every time.

Now, this can still be worked around, of course (you can do something like example().__class__() to get another instance), but it's much more clear that you're doing something wrong than if you simply ignored a factory function in order to use the constructor normally. Plus, it means the calling code actually acts as if it were calling the constructor normally :)

The Duck Typing is the thing that is getting me at the moment, so used to defining interfaces then basing classes on these interfaces and letting the static stuff cover my stupidity that I feel that without static typing, containers are a bit useless.

You need to shift your thinking: stop worrying about what the thing you've been passed is, and worry about whether it can do what you want it to do. That's how duck typing works.

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There is a difference between dependency injection, and inversion of control. It is very slight but significant. Also you can not say that program decomposition (Normalized data, responsibilities, collaborations) are there for the purpose of inversion of control or that there has been thought about inversion of control, when decomposing your program into suitable structures. If you do think about inversion of control at design time, then your introducing programming artifacts of a language environment into pure design in my humble opinion :) –  WeNeedAnswers Jul 30 '11 at 13:17
    
Second read, Unit Tests and documentation to enforce interfaces? I thought the whole point of duck typing is that if it looks like a duck and talks like a duck then we call it a duck. If you enforce this tight coupling of abstraction through interfaces as you have described, then your throwing away one of the things I love about Python which is dynamic typing. –  WeNeedAnswers Jul 30 '11 at 21:18
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"Unit Tests and documentation to enforce interfaces? I thought the whole point of duck typing is that if it looks like a duck and talks like a duck then we call it a duck." Yes; and documentation is how you make sure everyone knows how ducks walk and quack; and unit tests are how you observe a duck-candidate. I have no idea what you mean by "tight coupling of abstraction through interfaces". Well-designed interfaces reduce coupling and improve cohesion. You can make good - or bad - interfaces in any language. –  Karl Knechtel Jul 30 '11 at 23:21
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Would I use Python on a large scale project, heck no. The fact that your promises are made through documentation alone makes it a very hard language to architect against. I have just been using the AsyncCore stuff, I came across a method that accepts a function of a certain signature. The only way I could work out the signature was to look at the Documentation. In C#, I can usually guess my way through most of it, and if there is anything exotic, I look it up, or the compiler yells at me to stop hitting it with rubbish. –  WeNeedAnswers Jul 31 '11 at 1:33
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"Well-designed interfaces reduce coupling and improve cohesion". Here lies the problem. You can not seriously design an interface in Python. I just read a good article which described python/ruby as play doh and Java/C# as LEGO bricks. It is far easier to reason over programming designs when your dealing with defined shapes as in LEGO than it is in Play doh. Thanks, I think through this discussion you have cleared up where I am getting problems with python and why. –  WeNeedAnswers Jul 31 '11 at 1:41

The conclusion

(The following is the most relevant part of the original post. I admit, I waxed a little poetical, and so I though I should simply include the most important sentences in their own section. That said, I feel that the poetic waxing is important enough that I have not deleted it.)

Dependency injection is still used. There will always be the need for objects to communicate with already instantiated objects. There will be a need for "parent" objects (or containers, or whatever) to set up the state of their "children". These will need to be passed in through some method or set through some assignment, but in the abstract sense, it is the same thing.

The original answer:

Type systems

Python is, in many ways, the second most mathematically pure language I've ever encountered -- it follows only Scheme (though I've not ever used Haskell, I understand that to be up there too).

Python supports closures natively, it has continuations (yield syntax), multiple inheritance, and a loop comprehension syntax which is largely unparalleled. All of these bring it far closer to Alonzo Church's original vision in Lambda Calculus (an McCarthy's original ideas behind Lisp). Python 3 makes it even more pure with set comprehensions (which make my heart flutter just thinking of their inherent beauty).

Constantly and continually there is the idea that the data stored in the variables of Python have more in common with their counterparts in Mathematics, so much that the interface of an object can be diminished to simply be, "the adjectives or set of adjectives which describe the object". Basically, an object's interface is wholly and completely contained in its __dict__ and displayed with dir.

All of that considered, it does start making one wonder whether the "traditional" way of looking at things ("traditional" with quotes because Python is as old as Java) really can work in such a language. When even arguments lists in Python have an OOP feeling to them (kwargs, anyone?) it really does turn the world upside-down.

Dependency injection is still used. There will always be the need for objects to communicate with already instantiated objects. There will be a need for "parent" objects (or containers, or whatever) to set up the state of their "children". These will need to be passed in through some method or set through some assignment, but in the abstract sense, it is the same thing. But there is an implicit trust that the contents of the passed object's __dict__ will contain an appropriate description. Because of this, it becomes far less, "once I have instantiated this object, I will bestow upon it the very things needed for the life," and far more, "Well, yea, an object needs a state, so I'm giving it one."

And this exposes a hidden aspect of static typing. In order for something which expects an IFoo to work, it has to have full and complete knowledge of what it means to be an IFoo, even if it will never need 90% of that definition. Meanwhile, duck typing makes the depending object know only that properties X, Y, and Z should be there at run-time.

Globals

As to globals. Avoid them unless you have no other choice. You are better off using a Singleton if only because Singletons allow you to log when the value changes. This is not true of globals.

There is a rule of programming, the more exposed and complicated your interface, the harder it will be to maintain. If something is placed in a global variable, anything in that module, and possibly anything in ANY module can modify the value. The code can almost become non-deterministic. I assure you, sadness follows.

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like your style of prose. I need to read it with appreciation before I can evaluate it :) –  WeNeedAnswers Jul 30 '11 at 21:43
    
Haskell is great, although my maths is poor. I struggled with Monads. I get monoids but Monads still elude me after 2 years :) F# is a great compromise. I personally like Python because it looks like pseudo code. –  WeNeedAnswers Jul 30 '11 at 21:45
    
Can you explain the Dict begin exposed through DIR, I never come across this. –  WeNeedAnswers Jul 30 '11 at 21:46
    
Not too sure about the container Class, hierarchy stuff. The beauty of being able to access Global Variables is that the need for a container disappears as your environment becomes the container. Yes it does require immense discipline, but so far I think that dynamic programming in general requires a lot more discipline that static programming. Its a lot less forgiving when things go wrong :) –  WeNeedAnswers Jul 30 '11 at 21:51
    
@WeNeedAnswers Discipline is easiest if we make it harder to misbehave ;-) –  cwallenpoole Jul 31 '11 at 2:02

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