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I have:

  • an abstract Message class,
  • an abstract CustomMessage extending Message,
  • a concrete SpecializedCustomMessage class extending CustomMessage,

as shown below, and I'm having trouble with the concrete class's constructor's call to super(). I've left out many details that I assume are irrelevant to the error I'm encountering. Is there a problem with having two levels of abstraction before deriving a concrete class?

public abstract class Message {
    private int priority;
    Message() {
        priority = 1;
    }
}
public abstract class CustomMessage extends Message {
    CustomMessage() {
        super();
    }
}
public class SpecializedCustomMessage extends CustomMessage {
    SpecializedCustomMessage() {
        /*
         * The following is flagged with the error:
         * "cannot reference this before supertype constructor has been called"
         */
        super();
    }
}

Edit: as requested, the entire file. Search for LoadCyclerMessage().

package ibm1620;

import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.Logger;

/**
 * Class Message: an object containing an event.  See
 * PriorityFIFOEventQueue for implementation of queue.
 *
 * @author Richard Jowsey <richard@jowsey.com>
 * @author Chap Harrison <clh@pobox.com>
 */
//
//
// Extensive rewrite 7-JUL-2011 by CLH to use queuing to avoid
// having the Producer block until the Consumer catches up.
//
//
public abstract class Message implements Comparable<Message> {

    private int priority;

    Message() {
        this.priority = 1;
    }

    Message(int priority) {
        this.priority = priority;
    }

    /**
     * Comparator to determine relative priority. Called by PriorityFIFOEventQueue.
     */
    @Override
    public int compareTo(Message other) {
        // TODO - compare this and other for priority
        return 0; // no priorities yet.
    }

    /**
     * process() is overridden to handle message subclasses
     */
    public abstract void process();

    static void say(String s) {
        System.out.println(s);
    }

    /* -------------------------------------------------------------------- */
    /**
     * Subclass ConsoleEventMessage:
     */
    public static class ConsoleEventMessage extends Message {

        private ConsoleObject obj = ConsoleObject.UNDEFINED_OBJ; // widget that was affected
        private ObjectState state = ObjectState.UNDEFINED_STATE; // the widget's new state

        /**
         * Constructor specifying object and new state.
         */
        public ConsoleEventMessage(ConsoleObject theObj, ObjectState theState) {
            super();
            obj = theObj;
            state = theState;
        }

        @Override
        public void process() {
            // handleConsoleEventMessage(this);
            // what do we do now??
        }

        /**
         * Message accessors
         */
        public ConsoleObject getObj() {
            return this.obj;
        }

        public ObjectState getState() {
            return this.state;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "[" + obj + ": " + state + "]";
        }

        public enum ConsoleObject {

            UNDEFINED_OBJ, RESERVED,
            /** Console keys */
            RESET, DISPLAY_MAR, SAVE, INSERT, RELEASE, START, SIE, SCE,
            /** Console toggle switches */
            POWER, SPARE, DISK, PARITY_CHECK, IO_CHECK, OVERFLOW_CHECK, SENSE_SWITCH_1, SENSE_SWITCH_2, SENSE_SWITCH_3, SENSE_SWITCH_4, EMERGENCY,
            /** Console dial */
            MAR_SELECTOR_DIAL,
            /** Card Reader events */
            LOAD, READ, PUNCH
        }

        public enum ObjectState {

            UNDEFINED_STATE, NA,
            /** Toggle switches */
            OFF, ON,
            /** Console keys */
            PRESSED,
            /** MAR selector dial positions */
            IR_1, IR_2, IR_3, OR_1, OR_2, OR_3, OR_4, OR_5, PR_1, PR_2, PR_3, CR_1
        }
    }


    /* -------------------------------------------------------------------- */
    /**
     * Subclass CyclerMessage:
     */
    public abstract class CyclerMessage extends Message {
        CyclerMessage() {
            super();
        }
    }

    public static class LoadCyclerMessage extends CyclerMessage {

        LoadCyclerMessage() {
            super();
        }

        @Override
        public void process() {
            try {
                Cycler.processLoadMessage();
            } catch (CheckStop ex) {
                Logger.getLogger(Message.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            } catch (BugStop ex) {
                Logger.getLogger(Message.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Subclass CardReaderMessage:
     */
    public static class CardReaderMessage extends Message {

        byte[] card;
        boolean lastCardIndicator;

        public CardReaderMessage(byte[] card, boolean lc) {
            super();
            this.card = card;
            this.lastCardIndicator = lc;
        }

        @Override
        public void process() {
            Cycler.processCardReadMessage();
        }

        public byte[] getCard() {
            return card;
        }

        public boolean isLastCard() {
            return lastCardIndicator;
        }
    }

    /* -------------------------------------------------------------------- */
    /**
     * Subclass CardPunchMessage: this is sent FROM the punch TO the CPU
     * to acknowledge that the buffer has been accepted and the CPU may now
     * resume.
     */
    public static class CardPunchMessage extends Message {

        PunchMessage message;

        public CardPunchMessage(PunchMessage m) {
            super();
            message = m;
        }

        @Override
        public void process() {
        }

        public PunchMessage getPunchMessage() {
            return message;
        }

        public enum PunchMessage {

            BUFFER_ACCEPTED
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
Are you sure that super() is the first call made? –  Jesus Ramos Jul 30 '11 at 4:45
    
Is there any code before super()? or is that it? –  gsfd Jul 30 '11 at 4:47
1  
@Chap: What does your file actually look like? –  Mehrdad Jul 30 '11 at 4:48
2  
I think the example may be over-simplified. –  Paul Bellora Jul 30 '11 at 4:48
    
show 1 more comment

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
public abstract class CyclerMessage

as opposed to other inner classes above is not declared static - why?

Did you test what happens if you declare it static? I wouldn't wonder if that will fix "cannot reference" error

public static abstract class CyclerMessage
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it does. Thanks - I still don't know if this is the best/right approach to defining a hierarchy of Message types, but it solves the problem I was having. –  Chap Jul 30 '11 at 14:47
    
glad to hear that this helped. I'm kinda on crusade against non-static (named) inner classes. :) –  gnat Jul 30 '11 at 15:18
    
I think that Joshua Bloch (Effective Java) is down on them too. But I've discovered a problem with using nested static public classes - they seem not to be visible outside of their package! Despite being "public". –  Chap Jul 30 '11 at 17:44
    
hm. Well in my experience these were as a rule perfectly visible - except for specific corner cases like passing via some dumb remote protocol (CORBA or IIOP don't recall exactly) or handling with buggy Eclipse IDE checks –  gnat Jul 30 '11 at 19:08
add comment

There is no error here. I just ran it successfully.

EDIT: All of your classes are inner classes of Message. That's the problem (I hope this is not intentional).

share|improve this answer
    
Same here, theres something he left out of his question. –  gsfd Jul 30 '11 at 4:56
    
Question edited to append entire file –  Chap Jul 30 '11 at 5:42
    
Yikes! Damn - my bad. My original example didn't reflect that. But, I thought that "static nested" classes were "largely" equivalent to top-level classes. –  Chap Jul 30 '11 at 5:59
    
My intention was to create a hierarchy of message types, and keep them all in the same file. I think it's incorrect to put multiple top-level class definitions into the same file (isn't it?), which was why I went for the static-nested approach instead. Is there a different way I should approach this? –  Chap Jul 30 '11 at 6:07
    
why do you want them to be in the same file - that's not necessary... You can have more files in a file, but only one of them can be public. –  Petar Ivanov Jul 30 '11 at 6:09
show 1 more comment

Look at priority.

Java classes are instantiated in the following order:

(at classload time) 0. initializers for static members and static initializer blocks, in order of declaration.

(at each new object)

  1. create local variables for constructor arguments
  2. if constructor begins with invocation of another constructor for the class, evaluate the arguments and recurse to previous step. All steps are completed for that constructor, including further recursion of constructor calls, before continuing.
  3. if the superclass hasn't been constructed by the above, construct the the superclass (using the no-arg constructor if not specified). Like #2, go through all of these steps for the superclass, including constructing IT'S superclass, before continuing.
  4. initializers for instance variables and non-static initializer blocks, in order of declaration.
  5. rest of the constructor.

Also, Odd situation for "cannot reference this before supertype constructor has been called"

share|improve this answer
    
Apologies for misrepresenting the problem -- the subclasses are actually inner classes of the top class. I appended the full file to the question. –  Chap Jul 30 '11 at 6:11
add comment

There are 3 reasons why super() would fail, one of them is that your superclass does not have no-arg constructor, which is NOT the case, the other one being that super() is NOT the first line in your constructor, which I think is the case. Another one as suggested by @EdC would be that your super class constructor is not visible to the class.

share|improve this answer
    
-1: funny suggestion –  Kowser Jul 30 '11 at 4:51
1  
There is a third reason, if the constructor is not visible from the sub-class. If the constructors are package protected (as in the example) but the classes are in different packages then this will fail as described. –  EdC Jul 30 '11 at 4:52
    
@Kowser what would you suggest? –  Oscar Gomez Jul 30 '11 at 4:53
    
Apologies for misrepresenting the problem -- the subclasses are actually inner classes of the top class. I appended the full file to the question. –  Chap Jul 30 '11 at 6:12
add comment

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