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Here is a snippet:

class Foo(object):
    def bar(self, x):
        def baz(y):
            print locals()['self']
        ..
        return baz(..)

foo = Foo()
foo.bar(..)

I have 2 boxes. On Windows Vista with Python 2.5 calling foo.bar(..) works. On Ubuntu with Python 2.7 calling foo.bar(..) throws a KeyError, not being able to find self in locals() dict.

Any ideas?

Edit: I owe an apology; it seems I have misguided you while trying to frame the problem. The actual code in the nested function evaluates a string coming from a DSL:

            r = re.compile(r'\$(\w+)')
            eval_string = r.sub(r'self.player.stats["\1"]', s)
            result = eval(eval_string)

It runs Vista/Python 2.5, fails on Ubuntu/Python 2.7.

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1  
It this just out of curiosity, or is part of solving a real problem? If it is part of a real problem, we might be able to sugest a better way to do it, since it's rare for you to need to use locals(). –  Jeremy Banks Jul 30 '11 at 5:32
    
This snippet is not correct. Calling foo.bar() actually does nothing as there is nothing returned and you are not calling baz –  joaquin Jul 30 '11 at 5:41
    
@joaquin: Thanks, fixed it. –  shanyu Jul 30 '11 at 5:46
    
@Jeremy: The code is just for demonstration purposes. –  shanyu Jul 30 '11 at 5:47
    
I'm confused now. Can we see a complete, coherent example? –  Karl Knechtel Jul 30 '11 at 6:56

4 Answers 4

Admitting that you can compute the variables dict before running bad, you can use this:

class Foo(object):
    def bar(self, x):
        outer_locals = locals()
        def baz(y):
            print outer_locals['self']
        ..
        return baz(..)

If, instead, you have to compute the dictionary at runtime (inside bad), this is the way to go:

import inspect

def outer_locals(depth=0):
    """
    With depth=0 behaves like locals(), depth=1 are the locals of the
    containing frame, depth=2 the locals of the frame containing the containing
    frame and so on...
    """
    return inspect.getouterframes(inspect.currentframe())[depth+1][0].f_locals

class Foo(object):
    def bar(self, x):
        def baz(y):
            print outer_locals(1)
        return baz(...)

Note that if not overwritten in the baz function, all of bar locals are available in bad:

class Foo(object):
    def bar(self, x):
        def baz(y):
            print self
        ..
        return baz(..)
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The problem is that my snippet works in one configuration and not in the other. –  shanyu Jul 30 '11 at 5:58
    
@shanyu: (I added a new example) Which configurations are you talking about? I tested both of the presented ones and they work. Maybe you have to provide more context of your snippets. –  GaretJax Jul 30 '11 at 6:01
    
Configurations: Vista/Python2.5, Ubuntu/Python2.7. My snippet shouldn't work on the latter configuration, are you sure it works? –  shanyu Jul 30 '11 at 6:06
    
Pretty sure yes, if that is the only code you have. As I said, you may have to provide more context: pastebin.com/FnLjdieu –  GaretJax Jul 30 '11 at 6:07
    
Mmmmh... looking at it, it works as I implemented it, but self is not in the baz locals dict, so locals()['self'] is NOT supposed to work. –  GaretJax Jul 30 '11 at 6:21

I get the same behavior you report in 2.7 using 2.6.6. However, I also get it using 2.5.2 and 2.4.6. (All Linux.)

Interestingly:

>>> class Foo(object):
    def bar(self, x):
        def baz(y):
            print self.__class__.__name__
            print locals()['self']
        return baz(4)
...
>>> Foo().bar(3)
Foo
<__main__.Foo object at 0x9801f4c>
>>>

Presumably there was some optimization or alteration of the process of computing the local symbol table whereby only names actually used in a given function's scope are added to its table, even if a given symbol would be accessible (and would not be a global!) were it to be explicitly referred to.

Changing the last line of bar() to return baz (rather than return baz(4)) we can see that self is not a local variable; it's a free variable:

>>> baz = Foo().bar(4)
>>> baz.func_code.co_nlocals, f.func_code.co_varnames, f.func_code.co_freevars
(1, ('y',), ('self',))

Even here, though, x has not been included among the free variables, because when the name isn't used in the interior function, it doesn't count as free there.

That explanation, though, makes the behavior you're describing under 2.5 on Vista sound like a bug.

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Hmmm, I believe the KeyError is correct; I get the same on Python 2.7.1 on OSX SnowLeopard.

Here's why. I modified your code to the following:

class Foo(object):

    def bar(self, x):
        quux = 4
        print locals()

        def baz(y):
            print locals()#['self']

        return baz(3)

foo = Foo()
foo.bar(2)

and got

{'quux': 4, 'self': <__main__.Foo object at 0x1004945d0>, 'x': 2}
{'y': 3}

The issue is that in baz the locals dict should not include self which is defined in an outer scope.

I'm really puzzled why this found self in baz's locatls under Windows. Either it is a bug in 2.5 or in the Windows implementation, or the language spec has changed between 2.5 and 2.7.

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The local variables are always the ones defined within the current called function, the global variables are always the ones defined at the top of your program. In bar self is a local variable. In baz self is somewhere inbetween the local and global variables. You can still reference it because Python will search for it in higher scopes as it's not defined in the local one, but you cannot access theese scopes' dictionary.

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