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Why is that strcpy() accepting char array pointer even though the definition of strcpy is char * strcpy( char * , const char * ) ??

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

main()
{
    char str[] = "Have A Nice Day";
    char ptr[17];

    strcpy(ptr, str);
    printf("%s", ptr);

}
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possible duplicate of Is array name a pointer in C? –  gnud Jul 30 '11 at 8:02
    
See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/5134189/… –  Charles Bailey Jul 30 '11 at 8:25
    
I'm guessing the OP is asking about const not about arrays vs pointers –  Paul Mar 13 at 15:39

3 Answers 3

An array is not a pointer (although they are similar in behavior and usage), but it transparently decays to one in a context where a pointer is needed (like in the case where it's passed as a parameter to a function that expects a pointer).

A more in-depth description can be found in the C FAQ 6.3.

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+1 For correct definition of an array. –  Jesus Ramos Jul 30 '11 at 8:11
1  
Yay for C FAQ! +1 –  gnud Jul 30 '11 at 8:12

In C/C++ arrays are pointers as well. http://www.cplusplus.com/forum/articles/9/ See here for more explanation.

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Arrays are not pointers. But an array identifier can be implicitly converted to a pointer to the first array element. –  gnud Jul 30 '11 at 8:05

An char[n] gives an address which can be used in place of a const pointer with memory allocated at time of declaration.

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A char[] is not a const pointer, it is an incomplete array type. The two are not equivalent. Try compiling extern char a[]; char f() { return a[0]; } vs extern char* const a; char f() { return a[0]; } and looking at the difference. –  Charles Bailey Jul 30 '11 at 8:17

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