Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a conception problem on my ConverterManager. ConverterManager is an object that convert a type to an other type. As you can see below, I got an error when I'm tyring to create "convert" function.

public class StringIntegerConverter implements Converter<String, Integer> {
    @Override
    public Integer convert(String from) {
        //...
        return Integer.valueOf(from);
    }
}


public class ConverterManager {

    private static Map<Key,Converter<?,?>> converterRegistry;
    {
        converterRegistry = new HashMap<Key, Converter<?,?>>();
        converterRegistry.put(new Key(String.class, Integer.class), new StringIntegerConverter()); 
    }   

    public <T> T convert(Object source, Class<T> toType) 
    {
         //**ERROR HERE : cause "source" is an Object**
         return converterRegistry.get(new Key(source.getClass(),toType)).convert(source);
    }

}
  • Is there a way to solve this problem ? (I don't want to change my StringIntegerConverter to accepet converting from Object)

Thank you for reading, I hope someone will help me ;)

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Basically you'll have to perform an unsafe conversion - at execution time, the JVM can't check that you've really got a Converter<String, Integer>. That leaves the problem of persuading it to accept the input. You can do that via a "proxying" converter class which implements Converter<Object, ?>:

class ConverterConverter<T, U> implements Converter<Object, U>
{
    private final Converter<T, U> original;

    ConverterConverter(Converter<T, U> original)
    {
        this.original = original;
    }

    public U convert(Object input)
    {
        return original.convert((T) input);
    }
}

class ConverterManager {

    private Map<Key,Converter<Object,?>> converterRegistry;

    ConverterManager()
    {
        converterRegistry = new HashMap<Key, Converter<Object,?>>();
        converterRegistry.put(new Key(String.class, Integer.class),
                              new ConverterConverter<String, Integer>
                                  (new StringIntegerConverter())); 
    }   

    public <T> T convert(Object source, Class<T> toType) 
    {
        Key key = new Key(source.getClass(), toType);
        Converter<Object, ?> converter = converterRegistry.get(key);
        return (T) converter.convert(source);
    }
}

This is messy and it feels like there should be a better way, but it's all I've got at the moment...

share|improve this answer
    
Yes it could be a "good" solution, thank you ! –  Jarod Jul 30 '11 at 8:59

I can see one "problem" - your initializer block isn't static, but it refers to a static field. This means that while it "works", the static instance will be replaced every time a new instance of the class is instantiated. Try this:

private static Map<Key,Converter<?,?>> converterRegistry;
....
static { // ADD static KEYWORD!
    converterRegistry = new HashMap<Key, Converter<?,?>>();
    converterRegistry.put(new Key(String.class, Integer.class), new StringIntegerConverter()); 
}
...

A more elegant option is to use an instance block within an anonymous class (often erroneously called the "double brace" initializer, when in fact there is no such thing):

private static Map<Key,Converter<?,?>> converterRegistry = new HashMap<Key, Converter<?,?>>() {{
    put(new Key(String.class, Integer.class), new StringIntegerConverter()); 
}};
share|improve this answer
    
Yes you're right I miss to write it! –  Jarod Jul 30 '11 at 8:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.