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I've made a script that every few hours adds a new row to a Google Apps spreadsheet. This is the function I've made to find the first empty row:

function getFirstEmptyRow() {
  var spr = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var cell = spr.getRange('a1');
  var ct = 0;
  while ( cell.offset(ct, 0).getValue() != "" ) {
    ct++;
  }
  return (ct);
}

It works fine, but when reaching about 100 rows, it gets really slow, even ten seconds. I'm worried that when reaching thousands of rows, it will be too slow, maybe going in timeout or worse. Is there a better way?

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8 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The Google Apps Script blog had a post on optimizing spreadsheet operations that talked about batching reads and writes that could really speed things up. I tried your code on a spreadsheet with 100 rows, and it took about seven seconds. By using Range.getValues(), the batch version takes one second.

function getFirstEmptyRow() {
  var spr = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var column = spr.getRange('A:A');
  var values = column.getValues(); // get all data in one call
  var ct = 0;
  while ( values[ct][0] != "" ) {
    ct++;
  }
  return (ct);
}

If the spreadsheet gets big enough, you might need to grab the data in chunks of 100 or 1000 rows instead of grabbing the entire column.

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Seeing this old post with 5k views I first checked the 'best answer' and was quite surprised by its content... this was a very slow process indeed ! then I felt better when I saw Don Kirkby's answer, the array approach is indeed much more efficient !

But how much more efficient ?

So I wrote this little test code on a spreadsheet with 1000 rows and here are the results : (not bad !... no need to tell which one is which...)

enter image description here enter image description here

and here is the code I used :

function onOpen() {
  var menuEntries = [ {name: "test method 1", functionName: "getFirstEmptyRow"},
                      {name: "test method 2 (array)", functionName: "getFirstEmptyRowUsingArray"}
                     ];
  var sh = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  sh.addMenu("run tests",menuEntries);
}

function getFirstEmptyRow() {
  var time = new Date().getTime();
  var spr = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var ran = spr.getRange('A:A');
  var arr = []; 
  for (var i= ran.getLastRow(); i>0; i--){
    if(ran.getCell(i,1).getValue()){
      break;
    }
  }
  Browser.msgBox('lastRow = '+Number(i+1)+'  duration = '+Number(new Date().getTime()-time)+' mS');
}

function getFirstEmptyRowUsingArray() {
  var time = new Date().getTime();
  var sh = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var ss = sh.getActiveSheet();
  var data = ss.getDataRange().getValues();
  for(var n =data.length ; n<0 ;  n--){
    if(data[n][0]!=''){n++;break}
  }
  Browser.msgBox('lastRow = '+n+'  duration = '+Number(new Date().getTime()-time)+' mS');
}

function fillSheet(){
  var sh = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var ss = sh.getActiveSheet();
  for(var r=1;r<1000;++r){
    ss.appendRow(['filling values',r,'not important']);
  }
}

And the test spreadsheet to try it yourself :-)

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Thank you for the test. I've just moved the best answer to Don Kirkby's. –  Omiod Aug 19 '13 at 19:45
    
Excellent idea ! Thanks –  Serge insas Aug 19 '13 at 19:52
1  
I love it, Serge! –  Mogsdad Sep 7 '13 at 13:45
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Indeed the getValues is a good option but you can use the .length function to get the last row.

 function getFirstEmptyRow() {
  var spr = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var array = spr.getDataRange().getValues();
  ct = array.length + 1
  return (ct);
}
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It's already there as the getLastRow method on the Sheet.

var firstEmptyRow = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet().getLastRow() + 1;

Ref https://developers.google.com/apps-script/class_sheet#getLastRow

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3  
The issue with this is that if column A has 10 rows and Column B has 100, this will return 100. To get the last row of a column you have to iterate over the content (as far as I am aware) –  Jeremy Jun 6 '12 at 19:33
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I keep an extra "maintenance" sheet, on my spreadsheets, where I keep such data.

To get the next free row of a range I just examine the relevant cell. I can get the value instantly, because the work of finding the value happens when the data is changed.

The formula in the cell is usually something like :

=QUERY(someSheet!A10:H5010, 
    "select min(A) where A > " & A9 & " and B is null and D is null and H < 1")

The value in A9 can be set periodically to some row that is near "enough" to the end.

Caveat : I have never checked if this is viable for huge data sets.

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And why don't use appendRow?

var spreadsheet = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
spreadsheet.appendRow(['this is in column A', 'column B']);
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I have a similar issue. Right now it's a table with many hundreds of rows, and I'm expecting it to grow to many many thousands. (I haven't seen whether a Google spreadsheet will handle tens of thousands of rows, but I'll get there eventually.)

Here's what I'm doing.

  1. Step forward through the column by hundreds, stop when I'm on an empty row.
  2. Step backward through the column by tens, looking for the first non-empty row.
  3. Step forward through the column by ones, looking for the first empty row.
  4. Return the result.

This depends of course on having contiguous content. Can't have any random blank lines in there. Or at least, if you do, results will be sub-optimal. And you can tune the increments if you think it's important. These work for me, and I find that the difference in duration between steps of 50 and steps of 100 are negligible.

function lastValueRow() {
  var ss = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var r = ss.getRange('A1:A');
  // Step forwards by hundreds
  for (var i = 0; r.getCell(i,1).getValue() > 1; i += 100) { }
  // Step backwards by tens
  for ( ; r.getCell(i,1).getValue() > 1; i -= 10) { }
  // Step forwards by ones
  for ( ; r.getCell(i,1).getValue() == 0; i--) { }
  return i;
}

This is much faster than inspecting every cell from the top. And if you happen to have some other columns that extend your worksheet, it may be faster than inspecting every cell from the bottom, too.

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Finally I got a sinle line solution for it.

var sheet = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
var lastEmptyOnColumnB = sheet.getRange("B1:B"+sheet.getLastRow()).getValues().join(",").replace(/,,/g, '').split(",").length;

It works fine for me.

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