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I've made a script that every few hours adds a new row to a Google Apps spreadsheet. This is the function I've made to find the first empty row:

function getFirstEmptyRow() {
  var spr = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var cell = spr.getRange('a1');
  var ct = 0;
  while ( cell.offset(ct, 0).getValue() != "" ) {
    ct++;
  }
  return (ct);
}

It works fine, but when reaching about 100 rows, it gets really slow, even ten seconds. I'm worried that when reaching thousands of rows, it will be too slow, maybe going in timeout or worse. Is there a better way?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 20 down vote accepted

The Google Apps Script blog had a post on optimizing spreadsheet operations that talked about batching reads and writes that could really speed things up. I tried your code on a spreadsheet with 100 rows, and it took about seven seconds. By using Range.getValues(), the batch version takes one second.

function getFirstEmptyRow() {
  var spr = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var column = spr.getRange('A:A');
  var values = column.getValues(); // get all data in one call
  var ct = 0;
  while ( values[ct][0] != "" ) {
    ct++;
  }
  return (ct);
}

If the spreadsheet gets big enough, you might need to grab the data in chunks of 100 or 1000 rows instead of grabbing the entire column.

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This works only if you can guarantee that a row with a blank cell in column A is "empty". It also has no stopping condition for the while loop, so it can (and does) throw an exception if every cell in column A is full. Serge's adaptation handles the stopping condition. –  Mogsdad Nov 27 '14 at 20:52
1  
Also, result is off by 1. If first "empty" row is 10 (spreadsheet reckoning), this gives 9 (array reckoning). –  Mogsdad Nov 27 '14 at 21:52
    
See Mogsdad's answer for a more complete check of empty rows, as well as some performance comparisons. Thanks, @Mogsdad. –  Don Kirkby Nov 27 '14 at 23:42

This question has now had more than 12K views - so it's time for an update, as the performance characteristics of New Sheets are different than when Serge ran his initial tests.

Good news: performance is much better across the board!

Fastest:

As in the first test, reading the sheet's data just once, then operating on the array, gave a huge performance benefit. Interestingly, Don's original function performed much better than the modified version that Serge tested. (It appears that while is faster than for, which isn't logical.)

The average execution time on the sample data is just 38ms, down from the previous 168ms.

// Don's array approach - checks first column only
// With added stopping condition & correct result.
// From answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/9102463/1677912
function getFirstEmptyRowByColumnArray() {
  var spr = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var column = spr.getRange('A:A');
  var values = column.getValues(); // get all data in one call
  var ct = 0;
  while ( values[ct] && values[ct][0] != "" ) {
    ct++;
  }
  return (ct+1);
}

Test results:

Here are the results, summarized over 50 iterations in a spreadsheet with 100 rows x 3 columns (filled with Serge's test function).

The function names match the code in the script below.

screenshot

"First empty row"

The original ask was to find the first empty row. None of the previous scripts actually deliver on that. Many check just one column, which means that they can give false positive results. Others only find the first row that follows all data, meaning that empty rows in non-contiguous data get missed.

Here's a function that does meet the spec. It was included in the tests, and while slower than the lightning-fast single-column checker, it came in at a respectable 68ms, a 50% premium for a correct answer!

/**
 * Mogsdad's "whole row" checker.
 */
function getFirstEmptyRowWholeRow() {
  var sheet = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSheet();
  var range = sheet.getDataRange();
  var values = range.getValues();
  var row = 0;
  for (var row=0; row<values.length; row++) {
    if (!values[row].join("")) break;
  }
  return (row+1);
}

Complete script:

If you want to repeat the tests, or add your own function to the mix as a comparison, just take the whole script and use it in a spreadsheet.

/**
 * Set up a menu option for ease of use.
 */
function onOpen() {
  var menuEntries = [ {name: "Fill sheet", functionName: "fillSheet"},
                      {name: "test getFirstEmptyRow", functionName: "testTime"}
                     ];
  var sh = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  sh.addMenu("run tests",menuEntries);
}

/**
 * Test an array of functions, timing execution of each over multiple iterations.
 * Produce stats from the collected data, and present in a "Results" sheet.
 */
function testTime() {
  var ss = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  ss.getSheets()[0].activate();
  var iterations = parseInt(Browser.inputBox("Enter # of iterations, min 2:")) || 2;

  var functions = ["getFirstEmptyRowByOffset", "getFirstEmptyRowByColumnArray", "getFirstEmptyRowByCell","getFirstEmptyRowUsingArray", "getFirstEmptyRowWholeRow"]

  var results = [["Iteration"].concat(functions)];
  for (var i=1; i<=iterations; i++) {
    var row = [i];
    for (var fn=0; fn<functions.length; fn++) {
      var starttime = new Date().getTime();
      eval(functions[fn]+"()");
      var endtime = new Date().getTime();
      row.push(endtime-starttime);
    }
    results.push(row);
  }

  Browser.msgBox('Test complete - see Results sheet');
  var resultSheet = SpreadsheetApp.getActive().getSheetByName("Results");
  if (!resultSheet) {
    resultSheet = SpreadsheetApp.getActive().insertSheet("Results");
  }
  else {
    resultSheet.activate();
    resultSheet.clearContents();
  }
  resultSheet.getRange(1, 1, results.length, results[0].length).setValues(results);

  // Add statistical calculations
  var row = results.length+1;
  var rangeA1 = "B2:B"+results.length;
  resultSheet.getRange(row, 1, 3, 1).setValues([["Avg"],["Stddev"],["Trimmed\nMean"]]);
  var formulas = resultSheet.getRange(row, 2, 3, 1);
  formulas.setFormulas(
    [[ "=AVERAGE("+rangeA1+")" ],
     [ "=STDEV("+rangeA1+")" ],
     [ "=AVERAGEIFS("+rangeA1+","+rangeA1+',"<"&B$'+row+"+3*B$"+(row+1)+","+rangeA1+',">"&B$'+row+"-3*B$"+(row+1)+")" ]]);
  formulas.setNumberFormat("##########.");

  for (var col=3; col<=results[0].length;col++) {
    formulas.copyTo(resultSheet.getRange(row, col))
  }

  // Format for readability
  for (var col=1;col<=results[0].length;col++) {
    resultSheet.autoResizeColumn(col)
  }
}

// Omiod's original function.  Checks first column only
// Modified to give correct result.
// question http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6882104
function getFirstEmptyRowByOffset() {
  var spr = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var cell = spr.getRange('a1');
  var ct = 0;
  while ( cell.offset(ct, 0).getValue() != "" ) {
    ct++;
  }
  return (ct+1);
}

// Don's array approach - checks first column only.
// With added stopping condition & correct result.
// From answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/9102463/1677912
function getFirstEmptyRowByColumnArray() {
  var spr = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var column = spr.getRange('A:A');
  var values = column.getValues(); // get all data in one call
  var ct = 0;
  while ( values[ct] && values[ct][0] != "" ) {
    ct++;
  }
  return (ct+1);
}

// Serge's getFirstEmptyRow, adapted from Omiod's, but
// using getCell instead of offset. Checks first column only.
// Modified to give correct result.
// From answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/18319032/1677912
function getFirstEmptyRowByCell() {
  var spr = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var ran = spr.getRange('A:A');
  var arr = []; 
  for (var i=1; i<=ran.getLastRow(); i++){
    if(!ran.getCell(i,1).getValue()){
      break;
    }
  }
  return i;
}

// Serges's adaptation of Don's array answer.  Checks first column only.
// Modified to give correct result.
// From answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/18319032/1677912
function getFirstEmptyRowUsingArray() {
  var sh = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var ss = sh.getActiveSheet();
  var data = ss.getDataRange().getValues();
  for(var n=0; n<data.length ;  n++){
    if(data[n][0]==''){n++;break}
  }
  return n+1;
}

/**
 * Mogsdad's "whole row" checker.
 */
function getFirstEmptyRowWholeRow() {
  var sheet = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSheet();
  var range = sheet.getDataRange();
  var values = range.getValues();
  var row = 0;
  for (var row=0; row<values.length; row++) {
    if (!values[row].join("")) break;
  }
  return (row+1);
}

function fillSheet(){
  var sh = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var ss = sh.getActiveSheet();
  for(var r=1;r<1000;++r){
    ss.appendRow(['filling values',r,'not important']);
  }
}

// Function to test the value returned by each contender.
// Use fillSheet() first, then blank out random rows and
// compare results in debugger.
function compareResults() {
  var a = getFirstEmptyRowByOffset(),
      b = getFirstEmptyRowByColumnArray(),
      c = getFirstEmptyRowByCell(),
      d = getFirstEmptyRowUsingArray(),
      e = getFirstEmptyRowWholeRow(),
      f = getFirstEmptyRowWholeRow2();
  debugger;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just a small comment to mention that my original code was actually returning the correct value because I used the following code when the condition was true : {n++;break}. So adding 1 to n (in your modified version) makes it returning n+2 ... which is a bit too much ;-). I admit this wasn't probably the most obvious way to proceed. –  Serge insas Apr 21 at 12:14

It's already there as the getLastRow method on the Sheet.

var firstEmptyRow = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet().getLastRow() + 1;

Ref https://developers.google.com/apps-script/class_sheet#getLastRow

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3  
The issue with this is that if column A has 10 rows and Column B has 100, this will return 100. To get the last row of a column you have to iterate over the content (as far as I am aware) –  Jeremy Jun 6 '12 at 19:33

Seeing this old post with 5k views I first checked the 'best answer' and was quite surprised by its content... this was a very slow process indeed ! then I felt better when I saw Don Kirkby's answer, the array approach is indeed much more efficient !

But how much more efficient ?

So I wrote this little test code on a spreadsheet with 1000 rows and here are the results : (not bad !... no need to tell which one is which...)

enter image description here enter image description here

and here is the code I used :

function onOpen() {
  var menuEntries = [ {name: "test method 1", functionName: "getFirstEmptyRow"},
                      {name: "test method 2 (array)", functionName: "getFirstEmptyRowUsingArray"}
                     ];
  var sh = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  sh.addMenu("run tests",menuEntries);
}

function getFirstEmptyRow() {
  var time = new Date().getTime();
  var spr = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var ran = spr.getRange('A:A');
  for (var i= ran.getLastRow(); i>0; i--){
    if(ran.getCell(i,1).getValue()){
      break;
    }
  }
  Browser.msgBox('lastRow = '+Number(i+1)+'  duration = '+Number(new Date().getTime()-time)+' mS');
}

function getFirstEmptyRowUsingArray() {
  var time = new Date().getTime();
  var sh = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var ss = sh.getActiveSheet();
  var data = ss.getDataRange().getValues();
  for(var n =data.length ; n<0 ;  n--){
    if(data[n][0]!=''){n++;break}
  }
  Browser.msgBox('lastRow = '+n+'  duration = '+Number(new Date().getTime()-time)+' mS');
}

function fillSheet(){
  var sh = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var ss = sh.getActiveSheet();
  for(var r=1;r<1000;++r){
    ss.appendRow(['filling values',r,'not important']);
  }
}

And the test spreadsheet to try it yourself :-)


EDIT :

Following Mogsdad's comment, I should mention that these function names are indeed a bad choice... It should have been something like getLastNonEmptyCellInColumnAWithPlentyOfSpaceBelow() which is not very elegant (is it ?) but more accurate and coherent with what it actually returns.

Comment :

Anyway, my point was to show the speed of execution of both approaches, and it obviously did it (didn't it ? ;-)

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Thank you for the test. I've just moved the best answer to Don Kirkby's. –  Omiod Aug 19 '13 at 19:45
    
Excellent idea ! Thanks –  Serge insas Aug 19 '13 at 19:52
1  
I love it, Serge! –  Mogsdad Sep 7 '13 at 13:45
    
Both "getFirstEmpty" functions give incorrect results. Because they count backwards, they identify the last row with data in column A. In a sheet with contiguous data, this will be off-by-one from the first empty row. If there is an empty row earlier in the spreadsheet, neither will find it. –  Mogsdad Nov 27 '14 at 21:57
    
Hey Mogsdad, you're not wrong of course... it should be called "getLastRow" instead... I guess I used this name because of the other previous answers... As fo the restriction to column A, it was in the OP itself... Intermediate blank cells ? well, how to handle that ? Honestly I don't know the best choice, it mainly depends on what you are looking for... first gap in the list or last row from where you could go on ? Anyway, thanks for pointing it, I'll add a small edit about the function names ;-) –  Serge insas Nov 27 '14 at 22:35

I know this is an old thread and there have been some very clever approaches here.

I use the script

var firstEmptyRow = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet().getLastRow() + 1;

if I need the first completely empty row.

If I need the first empty cell in a column I do the following.

  • My first row is usually a title row.
  • My 2nd row is a hidden row and each cell has the formula

    =COUNTA(A3:A)
    

    Where A is replaced with the column letter.

  • My script just reads this value. This updates pretty quickly compared to script approaches.

There is one time this does not work and that is when I allow empty cells to break up the column. I have not needed a fix for this yet, I suspect one may be derived from COUNTIF, or a combined function or one of the many other inbuilt ones.

EDIT: COUNTA does cope with blank cells within a range, so the concern about the "one time this does not work" is not really a concern. (This might be a new behavior with "new Sheets".)

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Off-loading the identification of the last row to spreadsheet formulas is clever! –  Mogsdad Jul 12 at 13:29

Indeed the getValues is a good option but you can use the .length function to get the last row.

 function getFirstEmptyRow() {
  var spr = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var array = spr.getDataRange().getValues();
  ct = array.length + 1
  return (ct);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't give correct result if data has row-wide gaps. –  Mogsdad Nov 27 '14 at 22:02

I keep an extra "maintenance" sheet, on my spreadsheets, where I keep such data.

To get the next free row of a range I just examine the relevant cell. I can get the value instantly, because the work of finding the value happens when the data is changed.

The formula in the cell is usually something like :

=QUERY(someSheet!A10:H5010, 
    "select min(A) where A > " & A9 & " and B is null and D is null and H < 1")

The value in A9 can be set periodically to some row that is near "enough" to the end.

Caveat : I have never checked if this is viable for huge data sets.

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And why don't use appendRow?

var spreadsheet = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
spreadsheet.appendRow(['this is in column A', 'column B']);
share|improve this answer
    
Why not? Because it doesn't answer the question - the "first empty row" has not been identified. Instead, a new row was added to the bottom of the spreadsheet, even if there are "empty" rows above it. –  Mogsdad Nov 27 '14 at 22:46

I have a similar issue. Right now it's a table with many hundreds of rows, and I'm expecting it to grow to many many thousands. (I haven't seen whether a Google spreadsheet will handle tens of thousands of rows, but I'll get there eventually.)

Here's what I'm doing.

  1. Step forward through the column by hundreds, stop when I'm on an empty row.
  2. Step backward through the column by tens, looking for the first non-empty row.
  3. Step forward through the column by ones, looking for the first empty row.
  4. Return the result.

This depends of course on having contiguous content. Can't have any random blank lines in there. Or at least, if you do, results will be sub-optimal. And you can tune the increments if you think it's important. These work for me, and I find that the difference in duration between steps of 50 and steps of 100 are negligible.

function lastValueRow() {
  var ss = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
  var r = ss.getRange('A1:A');
  // Step forwards by hundreds
  for (var i = 0; r.getCell(i,1).getValue() > 1; i += 100) { }
  // Step backwards by tens
  for ( ; r.getCell(i,1).getValue() > 1; i -= 10) { }
  // Step forwards by ones
  for ( ; r.getCell(i,1).getValue() == 0; i--) { }
  return i;
}

This is much faster than inspecting every cell from the top. And if you happen to have some other columns that extend your worksheet, it may be faster than inspecting every cell from the bottom, too.

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Finally I got a sinle line solution for it.

var sheet = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet();
var lastEmptyOnColumnB = sheet.getRange("B1:B"+sheet.getLastRow()).getValues().join(",").replace(/,,/g, '').split(",").length;

It works fine for me.

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