Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In a game project of mine i'm trying my best to avoid the creation of objects and thus preventing the garbage collector from running.

It is a network game and I am mostly sending byte arrays of data but also some other objects like int arrays.

I have noticed when analyzing the memory allocation in eclipse that there are alot of byte arrays created in my program by the way I'm writing/reading to/from the sockets.

oos=new ObjectOutputStream(new BufferedOutputStream(link.getOutputStream()));
ois=new ObjectInputStream(new BufferedInputStream(link.getInputStream()));

How can I read / write (mostly byte arrays) from / to sockets without creating any more objects in the background?

Also what would be the fastest way to do this network communication? I need to squeez every bit of performance out of this application.

EDIT

I have changed my code a bit and i now only send loose bytes and ints through the oos. Still there is allocations done.

Allocations screenshot

Reading code

@Override
public void run() {
    super.run();
    byte packet = -1;
    while(connected){
        try {
            packet = ois.readByte();
            handlePacket(packet);
        } catch (OptionalDataException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            connected=false;
        }
    }

}

@Override
public void handlePacket(byte b) throws OptionalDataException, ClassNotFoundException, IOException {
    super.handlePacket(b);
    //TODO add more packets 
    switch(b){
    case Packet.SERVER_SEND_PLAYER_LOCATIONS:
        this.locations=(int[]) ois.readObject();
        break;
    case Packet.SERVER_SEND_PLAYER_COLORS:
        this.colors= (int[]) ois.readObject();
        break;
    case Packet.SERVER_SEND_WORM_WIDTH:
        wormWidth = ois.read();
        break;
    case Packet.SERVER_SEND_PLAYER_NUMBER:
        numberOfPlayers = ois.read();
        break;
    case Packet.CS_SEND_TURN:
        gp.addTurn(ois.read(),ois.read(),ois.readByte());
        break;
    }
}

Writing

    public void send(byte value){
    try {
        oos.write(value);
        oos.flush();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

}
public void send(int value){
    try {
        oos.write(value);
        oos.flush();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you add a little more of your code, such as where oos and ois is being called. The answer really depends on the scope of those two variables. The smaller the scope the sooner they will be eliminated. If you would like to reuse the same object say within a loop, you can instantiate them one time, then reuse them inside a loop (as long as you are sure there are no side-effects of this) – arunkumar Jul 30 '11 at 9:35

just make sure there's no references to those arrays !!!

some of your code will help

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.