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A similiar question was asked earlier there, but the question here is the reverse of it, using two queues as a stack. The question...

Given two queues with their standard operations (enqueue, dequeue, isempty, size), implement a stack with its standard operations (pop, push, isempty, size).

There should be TWO versions of the solution.

  • Version A: The stack should be efficient when pushing an item.
  • Version B: The stack should be efficient when popping an item.

I am interested in the algorithm more than any specific language implementations. However, I welcome solutions expressed in languages which I am familiar (Java, C#, Python, VB, Javascript, Php). Thanks in advance.

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1  
Is this a homework question? –  Brian Campbell Mar 27 '09 at 2:14
1  
Sure it is! CLRS - 10.1-6 (tinyurl.com/clrs-ex-10-1-6) –  rampion Mar 27 '09 at 2:18
1  
No, definitely not, honestly. –  TechTravelThink Mar 27 '09 at 2:19
3  
this is a pretty decent interview question –  George Godik Jan 12 '10 at 15:57
    
REmoved homework tag based on OP's comment. –  user127.0.0.1 Apr 24 '12 at 6:10

14 Answers 14

up vote 89 down vote accepted

Version A:

  • push:
    • enqueue in queue1
  • pop:
    • while size of queue1 is bigger than 1, pipe dequeued items from queue1 into queue2
    • dequeue and return the last item of queue1, then switch the names of queue1 and queue2

Version B:

  • push:
    • enqueue in queue2
    • enqueue all items of queue1 in queue2, then switch the names of queue1 and queue2
  • pop:
    • deqeue from queue1
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! Very elegant solution –  TechTravelThink Mar 27 '09 at 9:28
3  
Version B seems having problem: do you mean enqueue all items of queue2 to queue1 except the last element (then switch the names of q1 and q2)? –  Icerman May 24 '11 at 5:55
    
The comment of Icerman makes sense to me. The Version B of the answer needs an edit. I do not have edit permissions. Could someone please edit this answer? –  eeerahul Oct 7 '11 at 5:53
1  
@eeerahul: I have checked it again, and the answer is correct. At the time Icerman seems to want to enqueue all items of queue2 into queue1, queue2 consists only of the new item, so the comment does not make sense. –  Svante Oct 8 '11 at 21:42
1  
@user127.0.0.1: It seems that you forgot to switch the queues at the end of each pop. There is an invariant that after each push and each pop, all items are in queue1, while queue2 is empty. –  Svante Apr 26 '12 at 20:31

The easiest (and maybe only) way of doing this is by pushing new elements into the empty queue, and then dequeuing the other and enqeuing into the previously empty queue. With this way the latest is always at the front of the queue. This would be version B, for version A you just reverse the process by dequeuing the elements into the second queue except for the last one.

Step 0:

"Stack"
+---+---+---+---+---+
|   |   |   |   |   |
+---+---+---+---+---+

Queue A                Queue B
+---+---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+---+
|   |   |   |   |   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
+---+---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+---+

Step 1:

"Stack"
+---+---+---+---+---+
| 1 |   |   |   |   |
+---+---+---+---+---+

Queue A                Queue B
+---+---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+---+
| 1 |   |   |   |   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
+---+---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+---+

Step 2:

"Stack"
+---+---+---+---+---+
| 2 | 1 |   |   |   |
+---+---+---+---+---+

Queue A                Queue B
+---+---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+---+
|   |   |   |   |   |  | 2 | 1 |   |   |   |
+---+---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+---+

Step 3:

"Stack"
+---+---+---+---+---+
| 3 | 2 | 1 |   |   |
+---+---+---+---+---+

Queue A                Queue B
+---+---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+---+
| 3 | 2 | 1 |   |   |  |   |   |   |   |   |
+---+---+---+---+---+  +---+---+---+---+---+
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3  
+1 for drawing the example. It would be great if you give a pseudo code. –  amod0017 Mar 6 '13 at 18:39
    
I has the dumb: why is this good? –  slashdottir May 30 at 17:47

We can do this with one queue:

push:

  1. enqueue new element.
  2. If n is the number of elements in the queue, then remove and insert element n-1 times.

pop:

  1. dequeue

.

push 1


front                     
+----+----+----+----+----+----+
| 1  |    |    |    |    |    |    insert 1
+----+----+----+----+----+----+


push2

front                     
+----+----+----+----+----+----+
| 1  | 2  |    |    |    |    |    insert 2
+----+----+----+----+----+----+

     front                     
+----+----+----+----+----+----+
|    | 2  |  1 |    |    |    |    remove and insert 1
+----+----+----+----+----+----+




 insert 3


      front                     
+----+----+----+----+----+----+
|    | 2  |  1 |  3 |    |    |    insert 3
+----+----+----+----+----+----+

           front                     
+----+----+----+----+----+----+
|    |    |  1 |  3 |  2 |    |    remove and insert 2
+----+----+----+----+----+----+

                front                     
+----+----+----+----+----+----+
|    |    |    |  3 |  2 |  1 |    remove and insert 1
+----+----+----+----+----+----+

Sample implementation:

int stack_pop (queue_data *q)
{
  return queue_remove (q);
}

void stack_push (queue_data *q, int val)
{
  int old_count = queue_get_element_count (q), i;

  queue_insert (q, val);
  for (i=0; i<old_count; i++)
  {
    queue_insert (q, queue_remove (q));
  }
}
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1  
This is actually pretty good ! –  Agniva De Sarker Dec 5 '13 at 7:35
1  
@phoxis: Perfect solution . Very clean and precise ! –  ron May 11 at 6:20
import java.util.*;

/**
 *
 * @author Mahmood
 */
public class StackImplUsingQueues {

    Queue<Integer> q1 = new LinkedList<Integer>();
    Queue<Integer> q2 = new LinkedList<Integer>();

    public int pop() {
        if (q1.peek() == null) {
            System.out.println("The stack is empty, nothing to return");
            int i = 0;
            return i;
        } else {
            int pop = q1.remove();
            return pop;
        }
    }

    public void push(int data) {

        if (q1.peek() == null) {
            q1.add(data);
        } else {
            for (int i = q1.size(); i > 0; i--) {
                q2.add(q1.remove());
            }
            q1.add(data);
            for (int j = q2.size(); j > 0; j--) {
                q1.add(q2.remove());
            }

        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        StackImplUsingQueues s1 = new StackImplUsingQueues();
        //       Stack s1 = new Stack();
        s1.push(1);
        s1.push(2);
        s1.push(3);
        s1.push(4);
        s1.push(5);
        s1.push(6);
        s1.push(7);
        s1.push(8);
        s1.push(9);
        s1.push(10);
        // s1.push(6);
        System.out.println("1st = " + s1.pop());
        System.out.println("2nd = " + s1.pop());
        System.out.println("3rd = " + s1.pop());
        System.out.println("4th = " + s1.pop());
        System.out.println("5th = " + s1.pop());
        System.out.println("6th = " + s1.pop());
        System.out.println("7th = " + s1.pop());
        System.out.println("8th = " + s1.pop());
        System.out.println("9th = " + s1.pop());
        System.out.println("10th= " + s1.pop());
    }
}
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Thanks for the code - not just the algorithm outline –  kellyfj Oct 19 '13 at 14:29

Here's my answer - where the 'pop' is inefficient. Seems that all algorithms that come immediately to mind have N complexity, where N is the size of the list: whether you choose to do work on the 'pop' or do work on the 'push'

The algorithm where lists are traded back and fourth may be better, as a size calculation is not needed, although you still need to loop and compare with empty.

you can prove this algorithm cannot be written faster than N by noting that the information about the last element in a queue is only available through knowing the size of the queue, and that you must destroy data to get to that element, hence the 2nd queue.

The only way to make this faster is to not to use queues in the first place.

from data_structures import queue

class stack(object):
    def __init__(self):
        q1= queue 
        q2= queue #only contains one item at most. a temp var. (bad?)

    def push(self, item):
        q1.enque(item) #just stick it in the first queue.

    #Pop is inefficient
    def pop(self):
        #'spin' the queues until q1 is ready to pop the right value. 
        for N 0 to self.size-1
            q2.enqueue(q1.dequeue)
            q1.enqueue(q2.dequeue)
        return q1.dequeue()

    @property
    def size(self):
        return q1.size + q2.size

    @property
    def isempty(self):
        if self.size > 0:
           return True
        else
           return False
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queue<int> q1, q2;
int i = 0;

void push(int v) {
  if( q1.empty() && q2.empty() ) {
     q1.push(v);
     i = 0;
  }
  else {
     if( i == 0 ) {
        while( !q1.empty() ) q2.push(q1.pop());
        q1.push(v);
        i = 1-i;
     }
     else {
        while( !q2.empty() ) q1.push(q2.pop());
        q2.push(v);
        i = 1-i;
     }
  }
}

int pop() {
   if( q1.empty() && q2.empty() ) return -1;
   if( i == 1 ) {
      if( !q1.empty() )
           return q1.pop();
      else if( !q2.empty() )
           return q2.pop();
   }
   else {
      if( !q2.empty() )
           return q2.pop();
      else if( !q1.empty() )
           return q1.pop();
   }
}
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can we just use on queue to implement a stack? I can use two queues but considering single queue would be more efficient. here is the code

public void Push(T val) { queLower.Enqueue(val); }

    public  T Pop()
    {

        if (queLower.Count == 0 )
        {
            Console.Write("Stack is empty!");
            return default(T);

         }
        if (queLower.Count > 0)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < queLower.Count - 1;i++ )
            {
                queLower.Enqueue(queLower.Dequeue ());
           }
                    }

        return queLower.Dequeue();

    }
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Here is my solution that works for O(1) in average case. There are two queues: in and out. See pseudocode bellow:

PUSH(X) = in.enqueue(X)

POP: X =
  if (out.isEmpty and !in.isEmpty)
    DUMP(in, out)
  return out.dequeue

DUMP(A, B) =
  if (!A.isEmpty)
    x = A.dequeue()
    DUMP(A, B)
    B.enqueue(x)
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2  
There you are using 2 queues and 1 stack to simulate 1 stack! –  BeniBela Feb 21 '13 at 18:08
    
Do you mean implict recursion stack? –  Vladimir Kostyukov Feb 22 '13 at 4:11
    
yes (11 more to go...) –  BeniBela Feb 22 '13 at 10:19

Let S1 and S2 be the two Stacks to be used in the implementation of queues.

struct Stack 
{ struct Queue *Q1;
  struct Queue *Q2;
}

We make sure that one queue is empty always.

Push operation : Whichever queue is not empty, insert the element in it.

  • Check whether queue Q1 is empty or not. If Q1 is empty then Enqueue the element in it.
  • Otherwise EnQueue the element into Q1.

Push (struct Stack *S, int data) { if(isEmptyQueue(S->Q1) EnQueue(S->Q2, data); else EnQueue(S->Q1, data); }

Time Complexity: O(1)

Pop Operation: Transfer n-1 elements to other queue and delete last from queue for performing pop operation.

  • If queue Q1 is not empty then transfer n-1 elements from Q1 to Q2 and then, DeQueue the last element of Q1 and return it.
  • If queue Q2 is not empty then transfer n-1 elements from Q2 to Q1 and then, DeQueue the last element of Q2 and return it.

`

int Pop(struct Stack *S){
int i, size;
if(IsEmptyQueue(S->Q2)) 
{
size=size(S->Q1);
i=0;
while(i<size-1)
{ EnQueue(S->Q2, Dequeue(S->Q1)) ;
  i++;
}
return DeQueue(S->Q1);  
}
else{
size=size(S->Q2);
while(i<size-1)
EnQueue(S->Q1, Dequeue(S->Q2)) ;
i++;
}
return DeQueue(S->Q2);
} }

Time Complexity: Running Time of pop Operation is O(n) as each time pop is called, we are transferring all the elements from one queue to oter.

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#include <bits/stdc++.h>
using namespace std;
queue<int>Q;
stack<int>Stk;
void PRINT(stack<int>ss , queue<int>qq) {
    while( ss.size() ) {
        cout << ss.top() << " " ;
        ss.pop();
    }
    puts("");
    while( qq.size() ) {
        cout << qq.front() << " " ;
        qq.pop();
    }
    puts("\n----------------------------------");
}
void POP() {
    queue<int>Tmp ;
    while( Q.size() > 1 ) {
        Tmp.push( Q.front()  );
        Q.pop();
    }
    cout << Q.front() << " " << Stk.top() << endl;
    Q.pop() , Stk.pop() ;
    Q = Tmp ;
}
void PUSH(int x ) {
    Q.push(x);
    Stk.push(x);
}
int main() {
    while( true ) {
        string typ ;
        cin >> typ ;
        if( typ == "push" ) {
            int x ;
            cin >> x;
            PUSH(x);
        } else POP();
        PRINT(Stk,Q);
    }
}
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Please some words, explaining what this code is about, and how this thingy is able to help the OP in solving his/her problem, will be highly appreciated, along with the code example :-) –  nIcE cOw Jul 12 at 15:04

As has been mentioned, wouldn't a single queue do the trick? It's probably less practical but is a bit slicker.

push(x):
enqueue(x)
for(queueSize - 1)
   enqueue(dequeue())

pop(x):
dequeue()
share|improve this answer

Here's one more solution:

for PUSH : -Add first element in queue 1. -When adding second element and so on, Enqueue the element in queue 2 first and then copy all the element from queue 1 to queue2. -for POP just dequeue the element from the queue from you inserted the last element.

So,

public void push(int data){
if (queue1.isEmpty()){
    queue1.enqueue(data);
}  else {
queue2.enqueue(data);
while(!queue1.isEmpty())
Queue2.enqueue(queue1.dequeue());
//EXCHANGE THE NAMES OF QUEUE 1 and QUEUE2

} }

public int pop(){
int popItem=queue2.dequeue();
return popItem;
}'

There is one problem, I am not able to figure out, how to rename the queues???

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Here is some simple pseudo code, push is O(n), pop / peek is O(1):

Qpush = Qinstance()
Qpop = Qinstance()

def stack.push(item):
    Qpush.add(item)
    while Qpop.peek() != null: //transfer Qpop into Qpush
        Qpush.add(Qpop.remove()) 
    swap = Qpush
    Qpush = Qpop
    Qpop = swap

def stack.pop():
    return Qpop.remove()

def stack.peek():
    return Qpop.peek()
share|improve this answer

Here's my solution..

Concept_Behind:: push(struct Stack* S,int data)::This function enqueue first element in Q1 and rest in Q2 pop(struct Stack* S)::if Q2 is not empty the transfers all elem's into Q1 and return the last elem in Q2 else(which means Q2 is empty ) transfers all elem's into Q2 and returns the last elem in Q1

Efficiency_Behind:: push(struct Stack*S,int data)::O(1)//since single enqueue per data pop(struct Stack* S)::O(n)//since tranfers worst n-1 data per pop.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
struct Queue{
    int front;
    int rear;
    int *arr;
    int size;
    };
struct Stack {
    struct Queue *Q1;
    struct Queue *Q2;
    };
struct Queue* Qconstructor(int capacity)
{
    struct Queue *Q=malloc(sizeof(struct Queue));
    Q->front=Q->rear=-1;
    Q->size=capacity;
    Q->arr=malloc(Q->size*sizeof(int));
    return Q;
    }
int isEmptyQueue(struct Queue *Q)
{
    return (Q->front==-1);
    }
int isFullQueue(struct Queue *Q)
{
    return ((Q->rear+1) % Q->size ==Q->front);
    }
void enqueue(struct Queue *Q,int data)
{
    if(isFullQueue(Q))
        {
            printf("Queue overflow\n");
            return;}
    Q->rear=Q->rear+1 % Q->size;
    Q->arr[Q->rear]=data;
    if(Q->front==-1)
        Q->front=Q->rear;
        }
int dequeue(struct Queue *Q)
{
    if(isEmptyQueue(Q)){
        printf("Queue underflow\n");
        return;
        }
    int data=Q->arr[Q->front];
    if(Q->front==Q->rear)
        Q->front=-1;
    else
    Q->front=Q->front+1 % Q->size;
    return data;
    }
///////////////////////*************main algo****************////////////////////////
struct Stack* Sconstructor(int capacity)
{
    struct Stack *S=malloc(sizeof(struct Stack));
    S->Q1=Qconstructor(capacity);
    S->Q2=Qconstructor(capacity);
    return S;
}
void push(struct Stack *S,int data)
{
    if(isEmptyQueue(S->Q1))
        enqueue(S->Q1,data);
    else
        enqueue(S->Q2,data);
    }
int pop(struct Stack *S)
{
    int i,tmp;
    if(!isEmptyQueue(S->Q2)){
        for(i=S->Q2->front;i<=S->Q2->rear;i++){
            tmp=dequeue(S->Q2);
            if(isEmptyQueue(S->Q2))
                return tmp;
            else
                enqueue(S->Q1,tmp);
                }
            }
    else{
        for(i=S->Q1->front;i<=S->Q1->rear;i++){
            tmp=dequeue(S->Q1);
            if(isEmptyQueue(S->Q1))
                return tmp;
            else
                enqueue(S->Q2,tmp);
                }
            }
        }
////////////////*************end of main algo my algo************
///////////////*************push() O(1);;;;pop() O(n);;;;*******/////
main()
{
    int size;
    printf("Enter the number of elements in the Stack(made of 2 queue's)::\n");
    scanf("%d",&size);
    struct Stack *S=Sconstructor(size);
    push(S,1);
    push(S,2);
    push(S,3);
    push(S,4);
    printf("%d\n",pop(S));
    push(S,5);
    printf("%d\n",pop(S));
    printf("%d\n",pop(S));
    printf("%d\n",pop(S));
    printf("%d\n",pop(S));
    }
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