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I have a simple function with an inner loop - it scales the input value, looks up an output value in a lookup table, and copies it to the destination. (ftol_ambient is a trick I copied from the web for fast conversion of float to int).

for (i = 0;  i < iCount;  ++i)
{
    iScaled = ftol_ambient(*pSource * PRECISION3);
    if (iScaled <= 0)
        *pDestination = 0;
    else if (iScaled >= PRECISION3)
        *pDestination = 255;
    else
    {
        iSRGB = FloatToSRGBTable3[iScaled];
        *pDestination = iSRGB;
    }
    pSource++;
    pDestination++;
}

Now my lookup table is finite, and floats are infinite, so there's a possibility of off-by-one errors. I created a copy of the function with some code to handle that case. Notice that the only difference is the added 2 lines of code - please ignore the ugly pointer casting.

for (i = 0;  i < iCount;  ++i)
{
    iScaled = ftol_ambient(*pSource * PRECISION3);
    if (iScaled <= 0)
        *pDestination = 0;
    else if (iScaled >= PRECISION3)
        *pDestination = 255;
    else
    {
        iSRGB = FloatToSRGBTable3[iScaled];
        if (((int *)SRGBCeiling)[iSRGB] <= *((int *)pSource))
            ++iSRGB;
        *pDestination = (unsigned char) iSRGB;
    }
    pSource++;
    pDestination++;
}

Here's the strange part. I'm testing both versions with identical input of 100000 elements, repeated 100 times. On my Athlon 64 1.8 GHz (32 bit mode), the first function takes 0.231 seconds, and the second (longer) function takes 0.185 seconds. Both functions are adjacent in the same source file, so there's no possibility of different compiler settings. I've run the tests many times, reversing the order they're run in, and the timings are roughly the same every time.

I know there's a lot of mystery in modern processors, but how is this possible?

Here for comparison are the relevant assembler outputs from the Microsoft VC++6 compiler.


; 173  : 	for (i = 0;  i < iCount;  ++i)

$L4455:

; 174  : 	{
; 175  : 		iScaled = ftol_ambient(*pSource * PRECISION3);

	fld	DWORD PTR [esi]
	fmul	DWORD PTR __real@4@400b8000000000000000
	fstp	QWORD PTR $T5011[ebp]

; 170  : 	int i;
; 171  : 	int iScaled;
; 172  : 	unsigned int iSRGB;

	fld	QWORD PTR $T5011[ebp]

; 173  : 	for (i = 0;  i < iCount;  ++i)

	fistp	DWORD PTR _i$5009[ebp]

; 176  : 		if (iScaled <= 0)

	mov	edx, DWORD PTR _i$5009[ebp]
	test	edx, edx
	jg	SHORT $L4458

; 177  : 			*pDestination = 0;

	mov	BYTE PTR [ecx], 0

; 178  : 		else if (iScaled >= PRECISION3)

	jmp	SHORT $L4461
$L4458:
	cmp	edx, 4096				; 00001000H
	jl	SHORT $L4460

; 179  : 			*pDestination = 255;

	mov	BYTE PTR [ecx], 255			; 000000ffH

; 180  : 		else

	jmp	SHORT $L4461
$L4460:

; 181  : 		{
; 182  : 			iSRGB = FloatToSRGBTable3[iScaled];
; 183  : 			*pDestination = (unsigned char) iSRGB;

	mov	dl, BYTE PTR _FloatToSRGBTable3[edx]
	mov	BYTE PTR [ecx], dl
$L4461:

; 184  : 		}
; 185  : 		pSource++;

	add	esi, 4

; 186  : 		pDestination++;

	inc	ecx
	dec	edi
	jne	SHORT $L4455


$L4472:

; 199  : 	{
; 200  : 		iScaled = ftol_ambient(*pSource * PRECISION3);

	fld	DWORD PTR [esi]
	fmul	DWORD PTR __real@4@400b8000000000000000
	fstp	QWORD PTR $T4865[ebp]

; 195  : 	int i;
; 196  : 	int iScaled;
; 197  : 	unsigned int iSRGB;

	fld	QWORD PTR $T4865[ebp]

; 198  : 	for (i = 0;  i < iCount;  ++i)

	fistp	DWORD PTR _i$4863[ebp]

; 201  : 		if (iScaled <= 0)

	mov	edx, DWORD PTR _i$4863[ebp]
	test	edx, edx
	jg	SHORT $L4475

; 202  : 			*pDestination = 0;

	mov	BYTE PTR [edi], 0

; 203  : 		else if (iScaled >= PRECISION3)

	jmp	SHORT $L4478
$L4475:
	cmp	edx, 4096				; 00001000H
	jl	SHORT $L4477

; 204  : 			*pDestination = 255;

	mov	BYTE PTR [edi], 255			; 000000ffH

; 205  : 		else

	jmp	SHORT $L4478
$L4477:

; 206  : 		{
; 207  : 			iSRGB = FloatToSRGBTable3[iScaled];

	xor	ecx, ecx
	mov	cl, BYTE PTR _FloatToSRGBTable3[edx]

; 208  : 			if (((int *)SRGBCeiling)[iSRGB] <= *((int *)pSource))

	mov	edx, DWORD PTR _SRGBCeiling[ecx*4]
	cmp	edx, DWORD PTR [esi]
	jg	SHORT $L4481

; 209  : 				++iSRGB;

	inc	ecx
$L4481:

; 210  : 			*pDestination = (unsigned char) iSRGB;

	mov	BYTE PTR [edi], cl
$L4478:

; 211  : 		}
; 212  : 		pSource++;

	add	esi, 4

; 213  : 		pDestination++;

	inc	edi
	dec	eax
	jne	SHORT $L4472


Edit: Trying to test Nils Pipenbrinck's hypothesis, I added a couple of lines before and inside of the loop of the first function:

int one = 1;
int two = 2;

        if (one == two)
            ++iSRGB;

The run time of the first function is now down to 0.152 seconds. Interesting.


Edit 2: Nils pointed out that the comparison would be optimized out of a release build, and indeed it is. The changes in the assembly code are very subtle, I will post it here to see if it provides any clues. At this point I'm wondering if it's code alignment?

; 175  : 	for (i = 0;  i < iCount;  ++i)

$L4457:

; 176  : 	{
; 177  : 		iScaled = ftol_ambient(*pSource * PRECISION3);

	fld	DWORD PTR [edi]
	fmul	DWORD PTR __real@4@400b8000000000000000
	fstp	QWORD PTR $T5014[ebp]

; 170  : 	int i;
; 171  : 	int iScaled;
; 172  : 	int one = 1;

	fld	QWORD PTR $T5014[ebp]

; 173  : 	int two = 2;

	fistp	DWORD PTR _i$5012[ebp]

; 178  : 		if (iScaled <= 0)

	mov	esi, DWORD PTR _i$5012[ebp]
	test	esi, esi
	jg	SHORT $L4460

; 179  : 			*pDestination = 0;

	mov	BYTE PTR [edx], 0

; 180  : 		else if (iScaled >= PRECISION3)

	jmp	SHORT $L4463
$L4460:
	cmp	esi, 4096				; 00001000H
	jl	SHORT $L4462

; 181  : 			*pDestination = 255;

	mov	BYTE PTR [edx], 255			; 000000ffH

; 182  : 		else

	jmp	SHORT $L4463
$L4462:

; 183  : 		{
; 184  : 			iSRGB = FloatToSRGBTable3[iScaled];

	xor	ecx, ecx
	mov	cl, BYTE PTR _FloatToSRGBTable3[esi]

; 185  : 			if (one == two)
; 186  : 				++iSRGB;
; 187  : 			*pDestination = (unsigned char) iSRGB;

	mov	BYTE PTR [edx], cl
$L4463:

; 188  : 		}
; 189  : 		pSource++;

	add	edi, 4

; 190  : 		pDestination++;

	inc	edx
	dec	eax
	jne	SHORT $L4457
share|improve this question
    
Can you post the datatypes of the variables you use? –  strager Mar 27 '09 at 2:42
    
Sure, sorry. unsigned char * pDestination, const float * pSource, int iCount; int i; int iScaled; unsigned int iSRGB; –  Mark Ransom Mar 27 '09 at 2:50
    
Almost forgot #define PRECISION3 4096 –  Mark Ransom Mar 27 '09 at 2:51
    
And you probably want to know static unsigned char FloatToSRGBTable3[PRECISION3] and static float SRGBCeiling[256], too. –  Mark Ransom Mar 27 '09 at 2:52
    
I suspect caching problems (maybe; I have no idea). Can you disable caching (e.g. use valgrind) and see how that affects the difference in performance between the two methods? –  strager Mar 27 '09 at 3:00

5 Answers 5

My guess is, that in the first case two different branches end up in the same branch-prediction slot on the CPU. If these two branches predict different each time the code will slow down.

In the second loop, the added code may just be enough to move one of the branches to a different branch prediction slot.

To be sure you can give the Intel VTune analyzer or the AMD CodeAnalyst tool a try. These tools will show you what's exactly going on in your code.

However, keep in mind that it's most probably not worth to optimize this code further. If you tune your code to be faster on your CPU it may at the same time become slower on a different brand.


EDIT:

If you want to read on the branch-prediction give Agner Fog's excellent web-site a try: http://www.agner.org/optimize/

This pdf explains the branch-prediction slot allocation in detail: http://www.agner.org/optimize/microarchitecture.pdf

share|improve this answer
    
Of course it's not worth it, why should I complain that the better code is faster? But this is my hobby code, and I hate not understanding what's going on. P.S. good thinking on the branch-prediction slot, I'll try to make up a test for that. –  Mark Ransom Mar 27 '09 at 3:25
    
See my edit to the question. And thanks for the suggestion on AMD CodeAnalyst - I'll have to try it if I can find the time. Doesn't look like I can use the integrated version though. –  Mark Ransom Mar 27 '09 at 3:39

My first guess is that the branch is being predicted better in the second case. Possibly because the nested if gives whatever algorithm the processor's using more information to guess from. Just out of curiousity, what happens when you remove the line

if (((int *)SRGBCeiling)[iSRGB] <= *((int *)pSource))

?

share|improve this answer
    
Commenting out that line makes it roughly the same speed as the other code, within the variation I see in the timing results. –  Mark Ransom Mar 27 '09 at 2:56
    
How do you think a well predicted branch can be faster than no branch at all? –  Mark Ransom Mar 27 '09 at 2:58
    
/Two/ well predicted branches faster than /one/ badly predicted one. (Or some other numbers; there are 3 branches in the first listing and 4 in the second) –  aib Mar 27 '09 at 3:23

How are you timing these routines? I wonder if paging or caching is having an effect on the timings? It's possible that calling the first routine loads both into memory, crosses a page boundary or causes the stack to cross into an invalid page (causing a page-in), but only the first routine pays the price.

You may want to to run through both functions once before making the calls that take the measurements to reduce the effects that virtual memory and caching might have.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought of that, but the loop is 100000, and it's being repeated 100 times. Plus I swapped the order of the two functions. I'm using QueryPerformanceCounter for timing. –  Mark Ransom Mar 27 '09 at 4:14

Are you just testing this inner loop, or are you testing your undisclosed outer loop as well? If so, look at these three lines:

if (((int *)SRGBCeiling)[iSRGB] <= *((int *)pSource))  
    ++iSRGB;
*pDestination = (unsigned char) iSRGB;

Now, it looks like *pDestination is the counter for the outer loop. So by sometimes doing an extra increment of the iSRGB value you get to skip some of the iterations in the outer loop, thereby reducing the total amount of work the code needs to do.

share|improve this answer
    
I included the loop statement in the samples; i is the loop counter. Although it's assigned to different registers in the assembly output, I don't see how it would make a difference. The ++iSRGB condition is only hit 3% of the time. –  Mark Ransom Mar 27 '09 at 3:20
    
I see you clarified your answer. No, my outer loop is just as simple as the inner one: for (int i = 0; i < repeats; ++i) –  Mark Ransom Mar 27 '09 at 3:23

I once had a similar situation. I hoisted some code out of a loop to make it faster, but it got slower. Confusing. Turns out, the average number of times though the loop was less than 1.

The lesson (which you don't need, obviously) is that a change doesn't make your code faster unless you measure it actually running faster.

share|improve this answer

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