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When coding a web application, should all files be linked through a single index.php file. Would doing such a thing help security, or would it make more complications later on.

How would you guys achieve this? Most (if no all) the site I have seen use this approach. Is there a reason for this?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

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Can you please elaborate a bit? It is hard to know what you are asking. –  karim79 Jul 30 '11 at 14:00
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Doing so doesn't such much about security.

The main advantage is that having every request go through index.php makes sure that you have a single entry point into your applications's PHP code -- which means you can put your initialization / configuration code there (or call it from there) and it'll always get executed.


On the how to achieve this, you'll need :

  • A RewriteRule so all requests to non-existant files are sent to index.php
  • In your index.php script (or somewhere called by index.php, like a router), put some code to call the right controller/action.


For the RewriteRule, here's for example what is often done with Zend Framework :

RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -s [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -l [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -d
RewriteRule ^.*$ - [NC,L]
RewriteRule ^.*$ index.php [NC,L]
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If you don't use a central index.php, how else would you link files together? –  user826855 Jul 30 '11 at 14:17
    
Not sure I quite understand your question : using several .php scripts (one per actual page of the website) has been done for many years, and does work quite well (with its advantages and drawbacks) –  Pascal MARTIN Jul 30 '11 at 14:18
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