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I'm trying to write an event system for my game. The callbacks that my event manager will store can be both plain functions as well as functors. I also need to be able to compare functions/functors so I know which one I need to disconnect from the event manager.

• Initially I tried using boost::function; it handles functions and functors perfectly well, except it has no operator==, so I can't remove callbacks if I want to.

class EventManager
{
    typedef boost::function<void (boost::weak_ptr<Event>)> Callback;
    std::map<Event::Type, std::vector<Callback>> eventHandlerMap_;
};

• I also tried using boost::signal, but that also gives me a compilation problem related to operator==:

binary '==' : no operator found which takes a left-hand operand of type 'const Functor' (or there is no acceptable conversion)

void test(int c) {
    std::cout << "test(" << c << ")";
}

struct Functor
{
    void operator()(int g) {
        std::cout << "Functor::operator(" << g << ")";
    }
};

int main()
{
    boost::signal<void (int)> sig;

    Functor f;

    sig.connect(test);
    sig.connect(f);

    sig(7);

    sig.disconnect(f); // Error
}

Any other suggestions about how I might implement this? Or maybe how I can make either boost:: function or boost::signal work? (I'd rather use boost:: function though, since I've heard signal is rather slow for small collections of items.)


Edit: This is the interface of that I'd like EventManager to have.

class EventManager
{
  public:
    void addEventHandler(Event::Type evType, Callback func);
    void removeEventHandler(Event::Type evType, Callback func);

    void queueEvent(boost::shared_ptr<Event> ev);
    void dispatchNextEvent();
};
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@bdonlan The one in the signal example is from boost::function_equal. –  Paul Manta Jul 30 '11 at 15:19
    
sorta dup: stackoverflow.com/questions/89488/… –  stijn Jul 30 '11 at 15:22

4 Answers 4

You'll find that most generic function wrappers do not support function equality.

Why is this? Well, just look at your functor there:

struct Functor
{
    void operator()(int g) {
        std::cout << "Functor::operator(" << g << ")";
    }
};

This Functor has no operator==, and therefore cannot be compared for equality. So when you pass it to boost::signal by value, a new instance is created; this will compare false for pointer-equality, and has no operator to test for value-equality.

Most functors don't, in fact, have value-equality predicates. It's not useful very much. The usual way to deal with this is to have a handle to the callback instead; boost::signals does this with its connection object. For example, take a look at this example from the documentation:

boost::signals::connection c = sig.connect(HelloWorld());
if (c.connected()) {
// c is still connected to the signal
  sig(); // Prints "Hello, World!"
}

c.disconnect(); // Disconnect the HelloWorld object
assert(!c.connected()); c isn't connected any more

sig(); // Does nothing: there are no connected slots

With this, HelloWorld doesn't need to have an operator==, as you're referring directly to the signal registration.

share|improve this answer
    
If I'm doing to save the connection object, I might as well use vector<boost::fucntion> instead and save the iterator instead, since functions are faster than signals. Isn't there a way to make boost::function compare memory addresses instead? –  Paul Manta Jul 30 '11 at 15:34
    
boost::function also captures by value, so the addresses will never be the same. And I suspect signals won't be too much worse than a regular vector of functions. –  bdonlan Jul 30 '11 at 16:20

Have you ever tried libsigc and libsigc++? I started using them in linux and fell in love with them. I now use them in my Windows applications as well. I believe it is more extensible and flexible than boost. It is also a breeze to implement.

share|improve this answer

I highly recommend you consider Don Clugston's "Member Function Pointers and the Fastest Possible C++ Delegates". You can find the article and download the code from here:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cpp/FastDelegate.aspx

Among many other benefits, his delegates provide comparison operators (==, !=, <) out of the box. I'm currently using them for a realtime system and find them excellent in every way. I do seem to recall we had to make a minor modification to fix a compiler portability issue; but, that experience will vary based on platform etc.

Also, the article is several years old so you may want to google around for updated code/discussion regarding this delegate implementation if you run into any problems.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

No matter, I found the solution. A little template magic and things become simple(r):

template<typename F>
void EventManager::removeEventHandler(Event::Type evType, F func)
{
    auto compare = [func](const Callback& other) -> bool {
        F const* f = other.target<F>();
        if (f == nullptr) return false;
        return *f == func;
    };

    std::vector<Callback>& callbacks = ...;
    auto pend = std::remove_if(callbacks.begin(), callbacks.end(), compare);
    callbacks.erase(pend, callbacks.end());
}


template<typename R, typename F, typename L>
void EventManager::removeEventHandler(
    Event::Type evType, const boost::_bi::bind_t<R, F, L>& func)
{
    auto compare = [&func](const Callback& other) -> bool {
        auto const* f = other.target<boost::_bi::bind_t<R, F, L>>();
        if (f == nullptr) return false;
        return func.compare(*f);
    };

    std::vector<Callback>& callbacks = ...;
    auto pend = std::remove_if(callbacks.begin(), callbacks.end(), compare);
    callbacks.erase(pend, callbacks.end());
}

I need to handle Boost.Bind objects separately because operator== doesn't actually do comparison for Bind objects, but produce a new functor that compares the result of the other two (read more). To compare Boost.Bind you have to use the member function compare().

The type boost::_bi::bind_t seems to be an internal type of Boost (I guess that's what the underscore in namespace '_bi' means), however it should be safe to use it as all overloads of boost::function_equal also use this type (reference).

This code will work for all types of functors as long as there is an operator== defined that does comparison, or if you're using Boost.Bind. I had a superficial look into std::bind (C++0x), but that doesn't seem to be comparable, so it won't work with the code I posted above.

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