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From the below code one can discern that the function menu is called with three parameters. From the menu function how could one get name or diff name depending on which had called menu?

var menus = {
    name: menu('Control', [
    {
        label: 'Public Class My Robot',
        trigger: true,
        script: 'public class MyRobot extends SimpleRobot\n{\n[[next]]\n}\n',
        helptext: "Beginning fo your program",
        depend: "package edu.team2648.frcEasyJ;"
    }], false),
    diffname: menu('Control2', [
    {
        label: 'Public Class My Robot',
        trigger: true,
        script: 'public class MyRobot extends SimpleRobot\n{\n[[next]]\n}\n',
        helptext: "Beginning fo your program",
        depend: "package edu.team2648.frcEasyJ;"
    }], false),
};

Also what kind of var is menus? (Array, Object,...?) What is the difference between the following two snippets of code:

var test = ["str1","str2","str3","str4"];

var test2 = {id:"str1",id2:"str2",id3:"str3",id4:"str4"};
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2  
I suggest you read a tutorial: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Guide – Felix Kling Jul 30 '11 at 17:53
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since there are no associative arrays in JavaScript, you need to use objects if you want to assign key:val pairs and simulate the associative array functionality and reference behavior.

var test = ["str1","str2","str3","str4"]; signifies a numerically-indexed array. We see the square brackets which groups the array, and we only see comma delimited values. If we wanted to access 'str3' we'd use test[2].

var test2 = {id:"str1",id2:"str2",id3:"str3",id4:"str4"}; is an object. We see the curly braces which groups the object parameters, and we can see the key:val pairs split by the colon. If we want to access 'str3', we'd use test2.id3

One thing that might be confusing to beginners is that objects can contain arrays and arrays can contain objects, so the square brackets and curly braces can be mixed in and not be immediately obvious. You can create an array through the Array object like var arr = new Array(). To keep things simple, segregate them and call them by their intended behavior: [] = array, and {} = object.

In your example:

var menus = {
    name: menu('Control', [
    {
        label: 'Public Class My Robot',
        ....

You can see that menus is an object because it's assigned to a curly brace. You can see that name is a key and menu('Control' is a value, which happens to be a function in this case. It's first parameter is an obvious string, and it's second is an array [] which only contains one value, which is an object {} which has key:val pairs - label being the key, and 'Public Class My Robot' being the value which is simply a string in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
You conclusion is not 100% correct. Arrays being objects is not related to that fact that arrays (objects) can contain objects (arrays). – Felix Kling Jul 31 '11 at 10:12
    
Are you saying their mapping logic isn't the same behind the curtains? – AlienWebguy Jul 31 '11 at 17:48
    
No, that is not what I mean. To me it sounds like you are saying that objects can contain arrays as values (and vice versa) because arrays are objects. But that is not the case. They can be contained as values because... well.... they are just values. – Felix Kling Jul 31 '11 at 18:06
    
Fair enough - I removed the confusing sentence :) – AlienWebguy Jul 31 '11 at 18:26

test is an array and test2 is an object.

menus is an Object.

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Also what kind of var is menus? (Array, Object,...?) What is the difference between the following two snippets of code:

var test = ["str1","str2","str3","str4"]; 
var test2 = {id:"str1",id2:"str2",id3:"str3",id4:"str4"};

test is an Array, which is an Object.

test2 is an Object. In Javascripts objects can be represented as associative arrays: a property id on the test2 object can be accessed as test2.id and also as test2["id"]

So, test and test2 are both objects and arrays

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Just on a quick side note to say, "objects can be represented as associative arrays", imo does not make a whole lot of sense. Hashes (hash maps) can be represented as Objects in JavaScript. An associative Array already is specific kind of Object – FK82 Jul 30 '11 at 18:02
    
@FK82 agreed... – Nivas Jul 31 '11 at 8:33
    
If you change that, I'll +1 your answer. – FK82 Jul 31 '11 at 8:42

The test variables is assigned to an Array literal. The test2 variable is assigned to an Object literal.

I have read -- but cannot confirm -- that technically Arrays and Objects are best comparable to hash map constructs in other languages, the difference being that while Arrays have only Number keys, Objects may have any type as the key type (especially Strings). The use of String keys in Arrays (i.e. the use of associative Arrays) is not suggested in JavaScript.

The menus variable is assigned to an Object literal.

Please clarify what you mean by this:

From the menu function how could one get name or diff name depending on which had called menu?

If the menu Function returns an object of any type, the keys name or diffname will be mapped to that value: i.e.

var nameValue = menus.name ;
var nameDiffValue = menus.diffname ;
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