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I've seen a few ideas on this like instead of like Create, Update, Insert, Delete (CRUD) use Get and Put. That's good. However, I haven't seen much yet on how to deal with complexity. I've been told, "just write a method for every query type that you need".

Most of NOSQL seems okay to me until I start thinking about qualifiers (a where clause) -- there could be so many variations. Is there already a good scheme for implementing qualifiers in a sensible way, using just method names & argument conventions? Perhaps there's some kind of verb / noun scheme that works well, but which isn't a langauage in its own right.

I'm not after the 'right' answer... I'm hoping that there are a few schools of thought that I could learn from.


Found this blog post from the maker of RavenDB: http://ayende.com/blog/4562/ravendb-index-management

Can we implement more than one index on a class?

I even found that it might be possible to serialize anonymous delegates http://blogs.microsoft.co.il/blogs/aviwortzel/archive/2008/06/20/how-to-serialize-anonymous-delegates.aspx I suppose if this is possible, that they might use something like this.

But what if we don't have access to the same assembly (e.g. Silverlight). Found this post here: http://ayende.com/blog/4766/accessing-ravendb-from-silverlight

Is the IEnumerable object searched client-side or server-side? How specific can we get server side in NOSQL in narrowing down the result set before sending it back over the wire, without locking it to one unique id?


UPDATE: I ended up emailing Ayende from RavenDB. He kindly answered the questions that I had (below):

What you can do is write:

  public IEnumerable<T> FindAll(Expression<Func<T,bool>> whereClause)
  {
      return session.Query<T>().Where(whereClause).ToList();
  }

This uses linq to figure out your intent, and then sends the query to the server using RavenDB's syntax. On the server, we analyze your query, and the query optimizer checks to see if there is an existing index that can answer this query, and if there isn't, it will create a temporary index for you.

If you query that temporary index enough, RavenDB will make it permanent. Thus, self optimizing its own operations.

Did you get very far with the "from Silverlight" use case?

We are fully supporting Silverlight.

Can RavenDB handle more than one index server side?

Yes. In fact, we have some customers that have > 500 indexes running with no issues.

END OF INFO FROM Ayende at RavenDB


On designing a querey language (i.e. FindAll / where / delegate), mongo seem to achieve a little of this via JSON... http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Indexes I wish I knew more about it.

this sounds closer: http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/MapReduce


An interesting thread on serializing Serializing anonymous delegates in C#. It's not directly relevant... but I am just trying to look under the hood a little so I know more about potentials.

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closed as not a real question by C. A. McCann, Jeff Atwood Aug 1 '11 at 5:06

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Relevant question Data access architectures with Raven DB –  oleksii Jul 30 '11 at 19:25
    
@olesii. Thanks. I took a look. They seem to have hit similar issues. FindAll what? How can you impliment qualifiers? I can see how caching, or membership based scenarios would work well, but not anything that's a more complicated than that. I'm curious. –  sgtz Jul 30 '11 at 20:30
    
I posted an answer. With the current repository I am able to do Find, which can return all the records if needed. But... I am not sure this is the correct way at all. People have the right to say I'm absolutely wrong here. I failed to find any better solution though. –  oleksii Jul 30 '11 at 22:40
    
Pity this was closed! Great question in my opinion... –  UpTheCreek Feb 10 '12 at 18:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I am not sure this is applicable to NoSQL, but I implemented a Generic Repository pattern with Raven DB and here is a snippet.

First, I defined a few interfaces

internal interface ISessionProvider : IDisposable
{
    IDocumentSession OpenSession();
    void CloseSession();
}

public interface IDataAccessManager : IDisposable
{
    void Initialize();
    void OpenSession();
    void CloseSession();
}

public interface IRepository<T> where T : Entity
{
    IQueryable<T> Query();
    IEnumerable<T> Find(Func<T, bool> exp);
    T FirstOrDefault(Func<T, bool> exp);

    void Delete(T entity);
    void Add(T entity);
    void Save();

    string PutAttachment(string key, byte[] data);
    Attachment GetAttachment(string key);
    void DeleteAttachment(string key);
}

And this is a shorten implementation

internal class SessionProvider : ISessionProvider
{
    ...

    public IDocumentSession OpenSession()
    {
        session = store.OpenSession();
        return session;
    }

    public void CloseSession()
    {
        if (session != null)
        {
            session.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

public class DataAccessManager : IDataAccessManager
{
    ...

    public void Initialize()
    {       
        store = new DocumentStore
        {
            ConnectionStringName = ConnectionString
        };
        store.Initialize();
        store.DatabaseCommands.EnsureDatabaseExists(dbName);

        provider = new SessionProvider(store);
    }

    public void OpenSession()
    {
        session = provider.OpenSession();
    }

    public void CloseSession()
    {
        provider.CloseSession();
    }
}


public class Repository<T> : IRepository<T> where T : Entity
{
    ...

    public IEnumerable<T> Find(Func<T, bool> exp)
    {
        return AsQuaribale().Where(exp);
    }

    public void Add(T entity)
    {
        session.Store(entity);
    }

    public void Save()
    {
        session.SaveChanges();
    }

    public string PutAttachment(string key, byte[] data)
    {
        Guid? etag = null;
        var metadata = new RavenJObject
        {
            {"owner", Thread.CurrentPrincipal.Identity.Name},
            {"filename", key}
        };
        session.Advanced.DatabaseCommands.PutAttachment(key, etag, data, metadata);

        return key;
    }

    public Attachment GetAttachment(string key)
    {
        return session.Advanced.DatabaseCommands.GetAttachment(key);
    }

    private IQueryable<T> AsQuaribale()
    {
        return session.Query<T>().Customize(x => x.WaitForNonStaleResultsAsOfNow(Timeout));
    }
}

Usage sample

private void SendData()
{
    try
    {
        dataManager.OpenSession();
        repository = new Repository<MyDomainType>();

        ...

        foreach (string path in paths)
        {           
            //read file to memory
            byte[] data = File.ReadAllBytes(path);
            string fName = Path.GetFileName(path);
            myDomainType.Name = fName;

            //save data in memory and metadata to the database
            string key = repository.PutAttachment(
                myDomainType.Id.ToString(), data);

            repository.Add(myDomainType);
        }

        repository.Save();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        AppManager.LogException(ex);
    }
    finally
    {
        dataManager.CloseSession();
        dataManager.Dispose();      
    }
}

Sample test for create, which use Find (FirstOrDefault) method for assert

[Test]
public void CreateValueTest()
{
    var repository = ContainerService.Instance.Resolve<IRepository<DummyType>>();
    var expected = new DummyType();
    repository.Add(expected);
    repository.Save();
    DummyType actual = repository.FirstOrDefault(item => item.Id == expected.Id);

    Assert.IsTrue(expected == actual);
}
share|improve this answer
    
@olesii +1 thanks. Not bad. I guess you can use anonymous methods to clean it up some more. Does your Find(Func<T, bool> exp) execute client-side or server-side? –  sgtz Jul 31 '11 at 5:21
    
@sgtz feel free to edit the answer to improve quality (add anonymous methods). See, I think that expression is exequted on the server. It is just parsed on the client, Raven DB then just call session.Query<T>().... I am 99% sure Raven DB don't force client to load all the entities to the client and filter them there - no, instead it takes in IQuariable and executes it on its server side. Thus only the needed filtered result retruned. –  oleksii Jul 31 '11 at 13:32

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