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Let's say you have the below code:

function A() {
    function modify(){
       x = 300;
       y = 400;
    }
    var c = new C();
}

function B() {
    function modify(){
       x = 3000;
       y = 4000;
    }
    var c = new C();
}


C = function () {
   var x = 10;
   var y = 20;

   function modify() {
      x = 30;
      y = 40;
   };

   modify();
   alert("The sum is: " + (x+y));
}

Now the question is, if there is any way in wich I can override the method modify from C with the methods that are in A and B. In Java you would use the super keyword, but how can you achieve something like this in JavaScript?

share|improve this question
6  
modify is not a method but a nested function - there's a difference between those two... –  Šime Vidas Jul 30 '11 at 19:13
1  
In Java you use the super keyword to access the non-private fields and methods of a super-class. You don't use it to override them. –  FK82 Jul 30 '11 at 21:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 69 down vote accepted

JavaScript inheritance looks a bit different from Java. Here is how the native JavaScript object system looks:

// Create a class
function Vehicle(color){
  this.color = color;
}

// Add an instance method
Vehicle.prototype.go = function(){
  return "Underway in " + this.color;
}

// Add a second class
function Car(color){
  this.color = color;
}

// And declare it is a subclass of the first
Car.prototype = new Vehicle();

// Override the instance method
Car.prototype.go = function(){
  return Vehicle.prototype.go.call(this) + " car"
}

// Create some instances and see the overridden behavior.
var v = new Vehicle("blue");
v.go() // "Underway in blue"

var c = new Car("red");
c.go() // "Underway in red car"

Unfortunately this is a bit ugly and it does not include a very nice way to "super": you have to manually specify which parent classes' method you want to call. As a result, there are a variety of tools to make creating classes nicer. Try looking at Prototype.js, Backbone.js, or a similar library that includes a nicer syntax for doing OOP in js.

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2  
Alternatively to using a tool to "make creating classes nicer" you could not make classes at all. Classical OO emulation in js always gets messy. –  Raynos Jul 31 '11 at 11:24
    
Thanks Adam !!! exactly what I needed :) –  Daniel Nastase Aug 2 '11 at 11:58
1  
(not constructive comment) for being the "low level" language in the browsers world is very ugly for no reason. Still learning it, thanks! –  dnuske Nov 15 '12 at 17:05
    
I believe instead of Car.prototype = new Vehicle(); this should be Car.prototype = Object.create(Vehicle.prototype); no? –  Martin Dec 30 '14 at 17:57

Once should avoid emulating classical OO and use prototypical OO instead. A nice utility library for prototypical OO is traits.

Rather then overwriting methods and setting up inheritance chains (one should always favour object composition over object inheritance) you should be bundling re-usable functions into traits and creating objects with those.

Live Example

var modifyA = {
    modify: function() {
        this.x = 300;
        this.y = 400;
    }
};

var modifyB = {
    modify: function() {
        this.x = 3000;
        this.y = 4000;
    }
};

C = function(trait) {
    var o = Object.create(Object.prototype, Trait(trait));

    o.modify();
    console.log("sum : " + (o.x + o.y));

    return o;
}

//C(modifyA);
C(modifyB);
share|improve this answer
2  
You are not answering the question. This should be a comment if anything. –  FK82 Jul 31 '11 at 7:25
    
@FK82 let us continue this discussion in chat –  Raynos Jul 31 '11 at 13:06

modify() in your example is a private function, that won't be accessible from anywhere but within your A, B or C definition. You would need to declare it as

this.modify = function(){}

C has no reference to its parents, unless you pass it to C. If C is set up to inherit from A or B, it will inherit its public methods (not its private functions like you have modify() defined). Once C inherits methods from its parent, you can override the inherited methods.

share|improve this answer
    
modify is a local function. There is no private in javascript –  Raynos Jul 30 '11 at 21:51
    
local/private, isn't that the same thing, just a different term? –  alex heyd Jul 31 '11 at 15:43
    
not really. But people have a bad habit of mixing the two. –  Raynos Jul 31 '11 at 16:03

the method modify() that you called in the last is called in global context if you want to override modify() you first have to inherit A or B. Maybe what your trying to do is this

Maybe what your trying to do is this

In this case C inherits A

function A() {
    this.modify=function(){
       alert("in A");
    }


    }

function B() {
    this.modify=function(){
       alert("in B");

    }


}

C = function () {

   this.modify=function() {
      alert("in C");
   };

   C.prototype.modify(); // you can call this method where you need to call modify of the parent class

}

C.prototype=new A();
share|improve this answer
1  
C.prototype.modify() would have the wrong this value. Namely C.prototype instead of the instance of c. Please use .call(this) but then your answer is just a duplicate :) –  Raynos Jul 31 '11 at 12:33
    
@Raynos thanks for pointing out –  lovesh Jul 31 '11 at 14:50

Not unless you make all variables "public", i.e. make them members of the Function either directly or through the prototype property.

var C = function( ) {
    this.x = 10 , this.y = 20 ;
    this.modify = function( ) {
        this.x = 30 , this.y = 40 ;
        console.log("(!) C >> " + (this.x + this.y) ) ;
    } ;
} ;

var A = function( ) {
    this.modify = function( ) {
       this.x = 300 , this.y = 400 ;
       console.log("(!) A >> " + (this.x + this.y) ) ;
    } ;
} ;
    A.prototype = new C ;

var B = function( ) {
    this.modify = function( ) {
       this.x = 3000 , this.y = 4000 ;
       console.log("(!) B >> " + (this.x + this.y) ) ;
    } ;
} ;


new C( ).modify( ) ;
new A( ).modify( ) ;
new B( ).modify( ) ; 

You will notice a few changes.

Most importantly the call to the supposed "super-classes" constructor is now implicit within this line:

<name>.prototype = new C ;

Both A and B will now have individually modifiable members x and y which would not be the case if we would have written ... = C instead.

Then, x, y and modify are all "public" members so that assigning a different Function to them

 <name>.prototype.modify = function( ) { /* ... */ }

will "override" the original Function by that name.

Lastly, the call to modify cannot be done in the Function declaration because the implicit call to the "super-class" would then be executed again when we set the supposed "super-class" to the prototype property of the supposed "sub-classes".

But well, this is more or less how you would do this kind of thing in JavaScript.

HTH,

FK

share|improve this answer
    
There is no point in the <name>.prototype = new C; your shadowing all the members of the prototype anyway –  Raynos Jul 31 '11 at 11:21
    
@Raynos: Yes there is. To wit, all the inheriting Objects would be sharing the same member in C if you do not instantiate a C Object. Thus, changing x in A would change x in C and thus change x in B. Which is obviously undesireable. –  FK82 Jul 31 '11 at 12:13
    
you missed the point. You can remove the line and the code would still function –  Raynos Jul 31 '11 at 12:20
    
@Raynos: You are missing your own point I'm afraid. ;-) We want A and B to inherit from C. If that line would be missing, that would not be the case. In fact the only prototype both A as well as B would "shadow" would have access to in that case would be Object.prototype. –  FK82 Jul 31 '11 at 12:27
    
look at the code. A and B do not use any of the members of C up the prototype. So "inheriting" from C is useless. This is because A and B redefine x,y and modify and thus shadow all of C's members. What's the point of putting C in the prototype if your not using it? It's dead code. –  Raynos Jul 31 '11 at 12:31

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