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Does the this prefix for accessing member variables exist in Java?

Here is my HelloWorld code:

public class HelloWorld {

    public static int x = 0;

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        HelloWorld.x = 45;

        System.out.println(HelloWorld.x);
    }
}

The above code works with/without the class name prefixing the variable x. However, if i try: this.x = 45; or this->x = 45; I receive an error:

non-static variable this cannot be referenced from a static context

I understand member variables can be accessed without the HelloWorld (class name) prefix, like I have done. But, I want to know if the this prefix exists in Java, how do I use it?

EDIT:

Also, could you provide an example where this is appropriate?

duffymo & byte - I greatly appreciate your help. Thanks.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're attempting to use 'this' to refer to a static, not an instance variable. 'this' is only used to refer to the instance variables of an instantiated object of this class. You cannot use 'this' to refer to static variables on a class.

When you use 'this' you are saying "I want to refer to the variables of this particular instantiation of this class". A static on the other hand is always going to be the same variable for the class, irrespective of instantiation.

In addition the correct syntax for referring to an instance variable is by the dot operator:

this.x = 42; //correct
this->x = 42; //will not compile as its not valid Java

So essentially what you're after is something like the following:

public class Foo {

    private int x;

    public void setX(int x) {
        this.x = x;
    }

    public int getX() {
        return this.x;
    }
}

public class HelloWorld {

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Foo foo = new Foo();
        foo.setX(45);

        System.out.println(foo.getX());
    }

}
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+1 Your example gives me more clarity. –  Josh Jul 30 '11 at 19:56
    
Why is it the HelloWorld class and Foo class are treated differently? If you declared a variable outside the main method's scope in the HelloWorld class, you could not access it the same way using this prefix as you do in class Foo. Such that, like in duffymo's example, he had to instantiate a HelloWorld object IN HelloWorld. –  Josh Jul 30 '11 at 19:58
    
The difference here is that inside of main you are in a static context for HelloWorld, which is why you'd have to instantiate an instance of HelloWorld. The example I give is not dissimilar from duffymo's, except that I separated it out into another class to illustrate more clearly. –  Ben Lakey Jul 30 '11 at 20:02
    
The Sun Java tutorial explains it pretty well: download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/classvars.html –  paulsm4 Jul 30 '11 at 21:13

Java has this as a prefix, but it's a reference to the current instance.

Static methods and attributes are associated with a class, not an instance, so you can't use this inside a static method.

public class HelloWorld {

    public int x = 0; // note: now it's an instance attribute

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        HelloWorld hw = new HelloWorld();


        System.out.println(hw.x);
    }

    public int getX() { return this.x; }
    public void setX(int x) { this.x = x; }
}
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Man, I am a bit confused. Obviously, I am new. So, why is it necessary to declare a new HelloWorld object inside the HelloWorld class? –  Josh Jul 30 '11 at 19:51
    
You're not declaring a new HelloWorld instance inside the class; you're creating one in the main method, the entry point to your application that happens to exist inside the HelloWorld class. –  duffymo Jul 30 '11 at 19:59
    
Since your entry point of the application itself is HelloWorld, duffymo has just reused it to illustrate the point without adding an additional class to the mix. –  Ben Lakey Jul 30 '11 at 20:00
    
Ok, I think I'm getting closer.. So, the main method is the entry point to every Java app and isn't treated the same as other methods of its class because it is main or because it is static or both? –  Josh Jul 30 '11 at 20:02
    
It's nothing to do with the entry point. It's that main is a static method on HelloWorld, so you'd need to actually instantiate a HelloWorld to deal with instance variables. –  Ben Lakey Jul 30 '11 at 20:04

Remove the static modifier from your variable and then try it with this. Here is the difference:

Static variables exist only once in the whole program. No matter where you are, you could refer to HelloWorld.x and it would always be the same thing. That means, as you've declared it, anyone can modify it too, which may or may not be a good thing.

Member variables (not declared with static) are local to an instance of a class, which means you have to have created an instance with new before you can use it. However, every time you use new to create a new instance of that class, its non-static fields will be different. That is why you have to use this or, if in a different class, a reference to a specific instance in order to access them.

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A clarification:

in getter methods it's not necessary to use the keyword this (as it's been shown in other answers). If you're new to Java this will introduce you to variable scopes (local variables vs instance variables). In other words the following works perfectly:

public class Foo {
    private int x;

    public void setX(int x) {
        this.x = x; //Here the keywork this is necessary!
    }

    public int getX() {
         return x; //in this case the 'x' can only be instance variable 
    }
}

There is also another important use of this for invoking constructors defined in the same class (You might want to check the keyword 'super' as well). Check the following:

public class HelloWorld {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Foo foo1 = new Foo();
        Foo foo2 = new Foo(3, 4, 5);

        System.out.println("Foo1:\n" + foo1);
        System.out.println("Foo2:\n" + foo2);
    }
}

class Foo {
    private int x, y, z;

    public Foo() {
        this(-1, -1);
    }

    public Foo(int x, int y) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }

    public Foo(int x, int y, int z) {
        this(x, y);
        this.z = z;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "x= " + x + "\ny= " + y + "\nz= " + z + "\n";
    }
}

Enjoy!

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+1 Just noticed your answer and provided even more clarification 6 months later. Thanks. –  Josh Jan 20 '12 at 3:48

You can only use "this" from within an object instance.

"static", by definition, is OUTSIDE of ANY object.

Here's an excellent link in the Java documentation:

http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/classvars.html

'Hope that helps!

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for static variables, use ClassName (like you did). For instance (non-static) variables, use this.variableName

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you can use it to access instance variables and methods, you are getting this error because you are using this to access static variables.

and also ... java doesn't have =>, in java you use the .

  objectName.variableName = newValue
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Use this for getters/setters/constructors.

For example.

class Test {

int x;
int y;

public void Test(int x, int y) {
  this.x=x;
  this.y=y;
}

public void setX(int x) {
  this.x=x;
}
}
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Why does this work for this class, but not in the main method of my HelloWorld class? –  Josh Jul 30 '11 at 19:52

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