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I want printf to recognize multi-byte characters when calculating the field width so that columns line up properly... I can't find an answer to this problem and was wondering if anyone here had any suggestions, or maybe a function/script that takes care of this problem.

Here's a quick and dirty example:

printf "## %5s %5s %5s ##\n## %5s %5s %5s ##\n" '' '*' '' '' "•" ''
>##           *       ##
>##         •       ##

Obviously, I want the result:

>##           *       ##
>##           •       ##

Any way to achieve this?

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Have you called setlocale at the beginning of your program? UPD Oops, sorry... I see it's the shrlell command, not C function. –  n.m. Jul 31 '11 at 1:03

5 Answers 5

The best I can think of is:

function formatwidth
{
  local STR=$1; shift
  local WIDTH=$1; shift
  local BYTEWIDTH=$( echo -n "$STR" | wc -c )
  local CHARWIDTH=$( echo -n "$STR" | wc -m )
  echo $(( $WIDTH + $BYTEWIDTH - $CHARWIDTH ))
}

printf "## %5s %*s %5s ##\n## %5s %*s %5s ##\n" \
    '' $( formatwidth "*" 5 ) '*' '' \
    '' $( formatwidth "•" 5 ) "•" ''

You use the * width specifier to take the width as an argument, and calculate the width you need by adding the number of additional bytes in multibyte characters.

Note that in GNU wc, -c returns bytes, and -m returns (possibly multibyte) characters.

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This also works: printf "## %5s %$( formatwidth "*" 5 )s %5s ##\n## %5s %$( formatwidth "•" 5 )s %5s ##\n" '' '*' '' '' "•" '' –  Aesthir Jul 31 '11 at 17:23

I will probably use GNU awk:

awk 'BEGIN{ printf "## %5s %5s %5s ##\n## %5s %5s %5s ##\n", "", "*", "", "", "•", "" }'
##           *       ##
##           •       ##

You can even write shell wrapper function called printf on top of awk to keep same interface:

tr2awk() { 
    FMT="$1"
    echo -n "gawk 'BEGIN{ printf \"$FMT\""
    shift
    for ARG in "$@"
        do echo -n ", \"$ARG\""
    done
    echo " }'"
}

and then override printf with simple function:

printf() { eval `tr2awk "$@"`; }

Test it:

# buggy printf binary test:
/usr/bin/printf "## %5s %5s %5s ##\n## %5s %5s %5s ##\n" '' '*' '' '' "•" ''
##           *       ##
##         •       ##
# buggy printf shell builin test:
builtin printf "## %5s %5s %5s ##\n## %5s %5s %5s ##\n" '' '*' '' '' "•" ''
##           *       ##
##         •       ##

# fixed printf function test:
printf "## %5s %5s %5s ##\n## %5s %5s %5s ##\n" '' '*' '' '' "•" ''
##           *       ##
##           •       ##
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Hmmm... I tried this and get exactly the same result. Seems awk has the same problem. --edit-- Sorry, didn't read your reponse properly... using gawk works with this simple example, but awk has problems with quoting... suppose I wanted to write a script that is suitable for any printf line with quotes of all types interspersed. How would I keep my original single quotes in awk? or add more anywhere in the command? –  Aesthir Jul 31 '11 at 4:32
    
The above works if you triple up the backslashes: printf "## %5s '%5s' %5s ##\\\n## %5s '%5s' %5s ##\\\n" '' '*' '' '' "•" '' But what if I wanted single quotes in there? like this: printf "## %5s '%5s' %5s ##\\\n## %5s '%5s' %5s ##\\\n" '' '*' '' '' "•" ''? How to use gawk and still print the single quotes? –  Aesthir Jul 31 '11 at 17:32

Are these the only way? There's no way to do it with printf alone?

Well with the example from ninjalj (thx btw), I wrote a script to deal with this problem, and saved it as fprintf in /usr/local/bin:

#! /bin/bash

IFS=' '
declare -a Text=("${@}")

## Skip the whole thing if there are no multi-byte characters ##
if (( $(echo "${Text[*]}" | wc -c) > $(echo "${Text[*]}" | wc -m) )); then
    if echo "${Text[*]}" | grep -Eq '%[#0 +-]?[0-9]+(\.[0-9]+)?[sb]'; then
        IFS=$'\n'
        declare -a FormatStrings=($(echo -n "${Text[0]}" | grep -Eo '%[^%]*?[bs]'))
        IFS=$' \t\n'
        declare -i format=0

    ## Check every format string ##
        for fw in "${FormatStrings[@]}"; do
            (( format++ ))
            if [[ "$fw" =~ ^%[#0\ +-]?[1-9][0-9]*(\.[1-9][0-9]*)?[sb]$ ]]; then
                (( Difference = $(echo "${Text[format]}" | wc -c) - $(echo "${Text[format]}" | wc -m) ))

            ## If multi-btye characters ##
                if (( Difference > 0 )); then

                ## If a field width is entered then replace field width value ##
                    if [[ "$fw" =~ ^%[#0\ +-]?[1-9][0-9]* ]]; then
                        (( Width = $(echo -n "$fw" | gsed -re 's|^%[#0 +-]?([1-9][0-9]*).*[bs]|\1|') + Difference ))
                        declare -a Text[0]="$(echo -n "${Text[0]}" | gsed -rne '1h;1!H;${g;y|\n|\x1C|;s|(%[^%])|\n\1|g;p}' | gsed -rne $(( format + 1 ))'s|^(%[#0 +-]?)[1-9][0-9]*|\1'${Width}'|;1h;1!H;${g;s|\n||g;y|\x1C|\n|;p}')"
                    fi

                ## If a precision is entered then replace precision value ##
                    if [[ "$fw" =~ \.[1-9][0-9]*[sb]$ ]]; then
                        (( Precision = $(echo -n "$fw" | gsed -re 's|^%.*\.([1-9][0-9]*)[sb]$|\1|') + Difference ))
                        declare -a Text[0]="$(echo -n "${Text[0]}" | gsed -rne '1h;1!H;${g;y|\n|\x1C|;s|(%[^%])|\n\1|g;p}' | gsed -rne $(( format + 1 ))'s|^(%[#0 +-]?([1-9][0-9]*)?)\.[1-9][0-9]*([bs])|\1.'${Precision}'\3|;1h;1!H;${g;s|\n||g;y|\x1C|\n|;p}')"
                    fi
                fi
            fi
        done
    fi
fi

printf "${Text[@]}"
exit 0

Usage: fprintf "## %5s %5s %5s ##\n## %5s %5s %5s ##\n" '' '*' '' '' '•' ''

A few things to note:
• I didn't write this script to deal with * (asterisk) values for formats because I never use them. I wrote this for me and didn't want to over-complicate things.
• I wrote this to check only the format strings %s and %b as they seem to be the only ones that are affected by this problem. Thus, if somehow someone manages to get a multi-byte unicode character out of a number, it may not work without minor modification.
• The script works great for basic use of printf (not some old-skooler UNIX hacker), feel free to modify, or use as is all!

-- Aesthir

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A language like python will probably solve your problems in a simpler, more controllable way...

#!/usr/bin/python
# coding=utf-8

import sys
import codecs
import unicodedata

out = codecs.getwriter('utf-8')(sys.stdout)

def width(string):
    return sum(1+(unicodedata.east_asian_width(c) in "WF")
        for c in string)

a1=[u'する', u'します', u'trazan', u'した', u'しました']
a2=[u'dipsy', u'laa-laa', u'banarne', u'po', u'tinky winky']

for i,j in zip(a1,a2):
    out.write('%s %s: %s\n' % (i, ' '*(12-width(i)), j))
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The results of your example looks perfect! But I don't know the first thing about python... I wrote an fprintf script above that handles arguments exactly like printf, but works with multi-byte characters... could you or someone else whip up a python script to do the same? It may be faster than mine... but so far mine is the only way I know. –  Aesthir Jul 31 '11 at 17:42

A pure shell solution

right_justify() {
        # parameters: field_width string
        local spaces questions
        spaces=''
        questions=''
        while [ "${#questions}" -lt "$1" ]; do
                spaces=$spaces" "
                questions=$questions?
        done
        result=$spaces$2
        result=${result#"${result%$questions}"}
}

Note that this still does not work in dash because dash has no locale support.

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How would I call this function? what are the arguments I would use? and how does it help giving the printf commmand unicode support? –  Aesthir Jul 31 '11 at 18:33
    
For example, a call right_justify 10 abc writes into the variable result a string of 10 characters containing 7 spaces and abc at the end (if abc were more than 10 characters, the last 10 characters of it). Although returning the result via a global variable is a little ugly, it is much faster than writing it to stdout and calling the function via command substitution. –  jilles Aug 6 '11 at 21:38

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