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I need to reference a struct that's not yet defined because the struct actually conatins the typedef'd function prototype.

For example,

typedef int (MyCallbackFunction)(X * x, void * ctx);

typedef struct CallbackData {
  MyCallbackFunction * callback;
  void * ctx;
} CallbackData;

typedef struct X {
  char a;
  int b;
  int c;
  double d;

  CallbackData e;
} X;

What's the valid way to actually write this code/header ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just forward declare the relevant types - and you can make the function pointer part of the typedef:

struct X_;

typedef int (*MyCallbackFunction)(struct X_ * x, void * ctx);

typedef struct CallbackData_ {
  MyCallbackFunction callback;
  void * ctx;
} CallbackData;

typedef struct X_ {
  char a;
  int b;
  int c;
  double d;

  CallbackData e;
} X;
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Will this work if I pass in a callback function that uses for example: int callback(X * x, void * ctx), or will the compiler complain that X is different from struct X? –  Adam M-W Jul 30 '11 at 22:24
    
Sorry, I fixed it -- I generally prefer to give the struct and its typedef different names so you can unambiguously refer to both as needed. See the edit. –  Kerrek SB Jul 30 '11 at 22:27

Just forward declare your typedefs

typedef struct X X;
typedef struct CallbackData CallbackData;

and then declare the structs later.

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Yes, you can forward declare the struct and use it in the declaration of MyCallbackFunction where you don't need it to be a complete type.

struct X;
typedef int (MyCallbackFunction)(struct X * x, void * ctx);
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