Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know of the error "The accessibility modifier of the set accessor must be more restrictive than the property or indexer". I also know the solution. Just not in this very specific case.

Consider this example:

    internal virtual bool IsFocused
    {
        get
        {
            return isFocused;
        }
        protected set
        {
            isFocused = value;
        }
    }
    private bool isFocused;

It shows the error. I just don't know why. How is "protected" not less accessible than internal? What would be the solution to this problem? I tried putting "internal protected" instead, without luck.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

protected allows an inherting class to access it while internal does NOT - internal restricts access to the assembly itself - see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/7c5ka91b%28v=vs.80%29.aspx

share|improve this answer

As it turns out, protected is more accessible than internal. Recall that internal means "not visible outside of this assembly" (except through InternalsVisibleTo access, which makes internal look like public), whereas protected means visible to all subclasses.

share|improve this answer
    
So what would be the solution? –  Mathias Lykkegaard Lorenzen Jul 30 '11 at 23:29
1  
The solution would depend on what you were trying to achieve in the first place. Do you really need this property to be internal? Perhaps you are trying to cram too many responsibilities into a single class/interface. Maybe you can scope the 'internal' surface area and put it in a separate fully internal class while keeping the top-level class public. –  bobbymcr Jul 30 '11 at 23:31

@bobbymcr is entirely right in his analysis. The solution would be to mark property as internal protected. In C# that means that it would be accessible both to derived classes AND to all classes from current assembly.

If you put internal protected to accessor method - that means that it is accessible to derived classes. But entire property is not, which causes the error. If you mark entire property as internal protected and accessor method as protected - everything is fine.

internal protected virtual bool IsFocused
{
    get
    {
        return isFocused;
    }
    protected set
    {
        isFocused = value;
    }
}
private bool isFocused;

Other option would be to introduce protected method that would be called in setter. Then you could mark entire property as internal and allow to override only that method.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.