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Is it possible in Java to make a Dictionary with the items already declared inside it? Just like the below C# code:

   Dictionary<string, int> d = new Dictionary<string, int>()
    {
        {"cat", 2},
        {"dog", 1},
        {"llama", 0},
        {"iguana", -1}
    };

How do I do this and what type do I use? I've read that Dictionary is obsolete.

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up vote 56 down vote accepted

This will do what you want:

Map<String,Integer> map = new HashMap<String, Integer>(){{
    put("cat", 2);
    put("dog", 1);
    put("llama", 0);
    put("iguana", -1);
}};

This statment creates an anonymous subclass of HashMap, where the only difference from the parent class is that the 4 entries are added during instance creation. It's a fairly common idiom in the Java world (although some find it controversial because it creates a new class definition).

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Indeed it does. Thanks. – WildBamaBoy Jul 31 '11 at 0:15
2  
And here is an explanation on what this is doing. techpolesen.blogspot.com/2007/08/… – Josh Smeaton Jul 31 '11 at 0:18
2  
The extra braces are not a style-thing. They are both functional and necessary to denote the code as an initializer block. – Affe Jul 31 '11 at 0:42
1  
I was talking to fireshadow, who thought you meant "use one brace, not two" not "don't anonymously subclass JavaSE library classes just to save yourself a bit of typing." – Affe Jul 31 '11 at 1:07
1  
@Josh Smeaton: Nice article, although there is a tiny mistake in it: the inner braces are an instance initializer, not a static initializer. – Sean Reilly Jul 31 '11 at 8:11
Map<String,Integer> map = new HashMap<String, Integer>(){{
put("cat", 2);
put("dog", 1);
put("llama", 0);
put("iguana", -1);
}};
share|improve this answer
    
Wow someone already posted this... – fireshadow52 Jul 31 '11 at 0:14
    
This doesn't compile, your answer was correct before you edited it. – Affe Jul 31 '11 at 0:42

Bite the bullet and type out the map name!

    Map<String, Integer> map = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
    map.put("cat", 2);
    map.put("dog", 1);
    map.put("llama", 0);
    map.put("iguana", -1);

You could also do something like this, which might save some typing with a long list:

    Object[][] values = {
        {"cat", 2},
        {"dog", 1},
        {"llama", 0},
        {"iguana", -1}
    };

    for (Object[] o : values) {
        map.put((String) o[0], (Integer) o[1]);
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
No way! Too much typing. :P – WildBamaBoy Jul 31 '11 at 0:41

If you use the Guava library, you can use its ImmutableMap class, either by itself (examples 1 and 2), or as an initializer for a HashMap (examples 3 and 4):

Map<String, Integer> map1 = ImmutableMap.<String, Integer> builder()
    .put("cat", 2)
    .put("dog", 1)
    .put("llama", 0)
    .put("iguana", -1)
    .build();
Map<String, Integer> map2 = ImmutableMap.of(
    "cat", 2,
    "dog", 1,
    "llama", 0,
    "iguana", -1
);
Map<String, Integer> map3 = Maps.newHashMap(
    ImmutableMap.<String, Integer> builder()
    .put("cat", 2)
    .put("dog", 1)
    .put("llama", 0)
    .put("iguana", -1)
    .build()
);
Map<String, Integer> map4 = Maps.newHashMap( ImmutableMap.of(
    "cat", 2,
    "dog", 1,
    "llama", 0,
    "iguana", -1)
);
share|improve this answer

Java7 almost introduced "collection literals" that would allow syntax like that. They'll probably try to shove it in Java8. I have no idea what is wrong with these people.

This can be easily achieved by some kind of wrapper API

Map<String,Integer> map = Maps.<String,Integer>empty()
    .put("cat", 2).put("dog",1)....; 

Not too bad. I would prefer something like

map("cat", "dog", ... )
.to(  1,     2,   ... );

This kind of thing must have been implemented by various people, unfortunately the standard API doesn't inculde such things.

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