Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to create a discriminator column. This column would hold one of the many statuses available. Like my code will show each status has a name as well as a background color. Each status share the same base class.

Here is my code:

public class Item
{
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual Status ItemStatus { get; set; }
}

public abstract class Status
{
    private readonly int _id;
    public static readonly Status Foo = new FooStatus(1);
    public static readonly Status Bar = new BarStatus(2);

    public Status()
    {

    }

    protected Status(int id)
    {
        _id = id;
    }

    public virtual int Id { get { return _id; } }
    public abstract string Name { get; }
    public abstract string BackgroundColor { get; }
}

public class FooStatus : Status
{
    public FooStatus()
    {

    }

    public FooStatus(int id)
        : base(id)
    {

    }

    public override string Name
    {
        get { return "Foo Status"; }
    }

    public override string BackgroundColor
    {
        get { return "White"; }
    }
}

public class BarStatus : Status
{
    public BarStatus()
    {

    }

    public BarStatus(int id)
        : base(id)
    {

    }

    public override string Name
    {
        get { return "Bar Status"; }
    }

    public override string BackgroundColor
    {
        get { return "Black"; }
    }
}

And here is my mapping:

public class ItemMap : ClassMap<Item>
{
    public ItemMap()
    {
        Id(x => x.Id).GeneratedBy.Identity();

        DiscriminateSubClassesOnColumn<int>("ItemStatus", 0).AlwaysSelectWithValue();
    }
}

Essentially, what I'd like is that if I set ItemStatus to Status.Foo then the ItemStatus column would have a value of 1. What I have now doesn't throw any exceptions but it always inserts ItemStatus as 0.

This is the inserting code I'm using:

        using (var session = sessionFactory.OpenSession())
        using (var transaction = session.BeginTransaction())
        {
            var item = new Item
                           {
                               ItemStatus = Status.Foo
                           };
            session.Save(item);
            transaction.Commit();

            var firstItem = session.Get<Item>(1);
            Console.WriteLine(firstItem.ItemStatus.Name);
        }

Where can I read up on this topic using FNH?

Before anyone suggests be to check on Google I did search several things but no where can I find a full example.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your SubclassMap would look something like this:

public class FooStatusMap : SubclassMap<FooStatus>
{
    public FooStatusMap()
    {
        DiscriminatorValue(1);
    }
}

This is called "table-per-class-hierarchy," and you're right it doesn't look like there are many resources on it out there.

I believe if you don't call DiscriminatorValue in a SubclassMap, NHibernate attempts to discriminate by looking at the name of the subclass being mapped and seeing if it matches up with the value in the discriminator column.

share|improve this answer
1  
Ah, I missed that. When I create a subclass map for each status NHibernate still inserts 0 as my ItemStatus. This must be due to the fact that I set the baseClassDiscriminator to 0. However, if I remove the baseClassDiscriminator NHibernate throws exception "Could not format discriminator value to SQL string of entity NHibernateDiscriminator.Domain.Item" when building my configuration. – User Jul 31 '11 at 2:47
    
@User: Interesting. I will set up this mapping and see if I can duplicate it. – Andrew Whitaker Jul 31 '11 at 2:53
    
@User: In the database, is the datatype an integer? – Andrew Whitaker Jul 31 '11 at 3:14
    
The database data type is an integer. Think it gets set by using DiscriminateSubClassesOnColumn*<int>* – User Jul 31 '11 at 3:15
    
@User: Actually, looking over your code again you need to define a mapping for the base Status type, and put the DiscriminateSubClassesOnColumn code there (not in ItemMap). Then define a subclass map for each sub type. – Andrew Whitaker Jul 31 '11 at 3:27

I wouldnt write submaps for all the subclasses you can just do this instead

public class FooMap: ClassMap<T>
{
//other mapping
DiscriminateSubClassesOnColumn("DiscriminatorColumn")
.SubClass<Foo1>(m => { })
.SubClass<Foo2>(m => { })
.SubClass<Foo3>(m => { });
}

Hope that helps

share|improve this answer
1  
My initial implementation was using this approach, but it's obsolete. – User Aug 1 '11 at 14:38

If you're open to the Discriminator column having the class names of the derived classes, you can implement this via automapping.

In your session factory:

private static ISessionFactory CreateSessionFactory()
{
    var cfg = new MyMappingConfiguration();
    return Fluently.Configure()
    .Database(MsSqlConfiguration.MsSql2008.ConnectionString(c => c.FromConnectionStringWithKey("MyConnectionKey")).FormatSql().ShowSql()
            )
    .Mappings(m => m.AutoMappings.Add(AutoMap.AssemblyOf<Status>(cfg)
    .IncludeBase<Status>()
    .Conventions.Add<PrimaryKeyConvention>()))
    .BuildSessionFactory();
}

Then add the MyMappingConfiguration override:

public class MappingConfiguration : DefaultAutomappingConfiguration
{
    public override bool IsId(Member member)
    {
        return member.Name == member.DeclaringType.Name + "Id";
    }

    public override bool IsDiscriminated(Type type)
    {
        return true;
    }
}

Hope that h

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.