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I'm trying to implement an algorithm that should run in parallel using threads or tasks. The difficulty is that I want the threads/tasks to share their best results from time to time with all other threads.

The basic idea is this:

//Accessible from each thread
IProducerConsumerCollection<MyObject> _bestObjects;

//Executed in each thread
DoSomeWork(int n){
    MyObject localObject;
    for(var i = 0; i < n; i++){
        //Do some calculations and store results in localObject
        if((i/n)%0.5 == 0)
        {
            //store localObject in _bestObjects
            //wait until each thread has stored its result in _bestObjects
            //get the best result from _bestObjects and go on
        } 
    }
}

How can this be achieved using System.Threading or System.Threading.Tasks and is it true that tasks should not be used for long running operations?

Update: Clarification

It's not my problem to have a thread safe collection but to make the threads stop, publish result, wait until all other threads have publihed their results to and then go on again. All threads will run simultaneously. Cutting a long story short:

  1. Whats better for long running operations? Task or Thread or anything else?
  2. How to communicate between threads/taks to inform each of them about the state of all other assuming that the number of threads is set at runtime (depending on available cores).

Best Regards

Jay

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You can start from reading Thread-Safe Collections –  zerkms Jul 31 '11 at 3:51
    
That doesn't help. I know System.Collections.Concurrent very well and I've searched MSDN and Google for about two hours. The problem is not to have a thread safe object where I can store my results, but to make a thread/tasks stop under a certain condition and wait for all other threads to do the same and then go on. –  Jay Jul 31 '11 at 3:56
    
if you need only one (?) thread to be active at some time - use semaphore. Or I cannot get your question :-S –  zerkms Jul 31 '11 at 3:59
2  
See: How to: Synchronize Concurrent Operations with a Barrier. "A Barrier is an object that prevents individual tasks in a parallel operation from continuing until all tasks reach the barrier. It is useful when a parallel operation occurs in phases, and each phase requires synchronization between tasks." –  Ani Jul 31 '11 at 4:20
    
Thats great! A barrier is exactly what I needed. –  Jay Jul 31 '11 at 4:51
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Look at the dollowing example.

public class Worker
{
    public SharedData state;
    public void Work(SharedData someData)
    {
        this.state = someData;
        while (true) ;
    }

}

public class SharedData {
    X myX;
    public getX() { ... }
    public setX(anX) { ... }    
}

public class Sharing
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        SharedData data = new SharedDate()
        Worker work1 = new Worker(data);
        Worker work2 = new Worker(data);
        Thread thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(work1.Work));
        thread.start();
        Thread thread2 = new Thread(new ThreadStart(work2.Work));
        thread2.start();
    }
}
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bomslang's response is not accurate. Cannot instantiate a new thread with ThreadStart, passing in Work method which requires a parameter to be passed in the above example. ParameterizedThreadStart would be more suitable. The sample code for the Main method would look more like this:

public class Sharing
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        SharedData data = new SharedDate()
        Worker work1 = new Worker(data);
        Worker work2 = new Worker(data);
        Thread thread = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(work1.Work));
        thread.start(someData);
        Thread thread2 = new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(work2.Work));
        thread2.start(someData);
    }
}

Note that 'work' is being passed into the ParameterizedThreadStart as the method for the new thread to execute, and the data required to pass in to the 'work' method is being passed in the call to start. The data must be passed as an object, so the work method will need to cast it back to the appropriate datatype as well. Lastly, there is also another approach to passing in data to a new thread via the use of anonymous methods.

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Can you please explain it more? –  user35443 Dec 20 '12 at 14:48
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