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I am seeing a very unusual behavior in python.. Kindly let me know what am i doing wrong!!

bc = [[0]*(n+1)]*(n+1)

for i in range(n+1):
    bc[i][i] = 1

print (bc)        

Output

[[1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1, 1]]

I am trying to initialize the diagonal elements of two dimensional array to 1, but it is initializing all the elements with 1. I think I am doing something wrong with accessing two dimensional Array..

Also, kindly let me know how can I use two loops to access all the elements of two dimensional array.. my next step..

Thanks.

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@Ignacio the fundamental problem is the same, but it's entirely understandable that the OP wouldn't realize that's what's causing it. –  Karl Knechtel Jul 31 '11 at 9:08

3 Answers 3

Your array is initialized incorrectly. The correct way to initialize a 2d array is this:

bc = [[0 for i in xrange(n + 1)] for i in xrange(n + 1)]

It's a common mistake, but the * operator copies the pointer to an list rather than copying the list, so while it looks like you have a 2d list, you actually have a 1d list of pointers to the same list.

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Hmm.. got It.. Thanks :) –  AlgoGeek Jul 31 '11 at 8:08
1  
"copies the pointer to" is awkward terminology that doesn't fit Python. More accurately, Python has reference semantics for both values and variables, and never copies by value implicitly; multiplication produces a list that stores multiple references to the same original value, just as it stored a reference in the first place. –  Karl Knechtel Jul 31 '11 at 9:11

the problem is that each array in your array is the same array in memory. you need a new array each time. the [[0]]*6 will for example make 6 of the same arrays in an array, editing one of them will update the other ones.

e.g.

>>> x=[1]
>>> y=x
>>> x.append(3)
>>> x
[1, 3]
>>> y
[1, 3]
>>> z=[x]*3
>>> x.append(6)
>>> z
[[1, 3, 4, 6], [1, 3, 4, 6], [1, 3, 4, 6]]

here is a fix by simply editing bc to be n+1 different arrays:

n=4
bc = [[0]*(n+1) for i in range(n+1)]

for i in range(n+1):
    bc[i][i] = 1

print (bc)

[[1, 0, 0, 0, 0], [0, 1, 0, 0, 0], [0, 0, 1, 0, 0], [0, 0, 0, 1, 0], [0, 0, 0, 0, 1]]
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Thanks. This was more clear!! :) –  AlgoGeek Jul 31 '11 at 8:09
1  
No worries. You could go [[0]*i+[1]+[0]*(n-i) for i in range(n)] –  robert king Jul 31 '11 at 8:14
    
@robert that's neat! –  Charles Ma Jul 31 '11 at 8:18
    
Note that in the inner arrays, to start, the list actually stores several copies of the same "0" object :) but this does not cause a problem, because mathematical operations - even things like += - replace the object rather than modifying it: Python's built-in ints are immutable. –  Karl Knechtel Jul 31 '11 at 9:12

Try this one:

bc = [[0 for i in range(n+1)] for j in range(n+1)]

In your example you have only one (!) instance of [0] which is referenced multiple times. So if you change that instance, all references are changed.

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1  
More to the point, he has one instance of [0, 0, 0...] (n + 1 zeroes). And within that instance, the 0s are all the same object, not that it matters. –  Karl Knechtel Jul 31 '11 at 9:14

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