Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I got the following code:

    protected virtual string FormatException(Exception exception, int intendation)
    {
        Contract.Requires(intendation >= 0);
        Contract.Requires<ArgumentNullException>(exception != null);
        Contract.Ensures(!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Contract.Result<string>()));

        var msg = exception.ToString().Replace("\r\n", "\r\n".PadRight(intendation, '\t'));
        string text = string.Format("\r\n******* EXCEPTION ********\r\n\t{0}", msg);
        return text;
    }

It gives me

Warning 19 CodeContracts: ensures unproven: !String.IsNullOrEmpty(Contract.Result())

Why?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't know if the String.Format() function has any contracts but it could only promise that the result != null, an empty string is a valid result.

I checked: String.Format() only ensures result != null

You can simply fix it by inserting an Assume() :

Contract.Assume(!String.IsNullOrEmpty(text));
return text;

But I would seriously reconsider making result is not empty part of your contract here. Does it really matter to the callers?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes it do matter when handling the result. MSDN doesn't document when it returns null? Won't it always return a string with the format string has been specified? –  jgauffin Jul 31 '11 at 17:44
    
The contract for String.Format() only specifies != null. Going beyond that would require a complicated expression based on the parameters. Maybe not impossible but rarely desired. You seem to have an exceptional case. –  Henk Holterman Jul 31 '11 at 18:04
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.