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If I have the list [68,31,93,35,10] (all the numbers will be different) and the list [93,0,22,10,99,33,21,9] (again, all the numbers will be different, but may overlap the other list), I need to be able to get exactly [68,31,93,35,10,0,22,99,33,21,9], where the second list is appended to the first list without duplicates. I also need to be able to get exactly [68,31,35] where the first list has all duplicates in the second list removed. The output always should be the same order as the input. How do I go about this? (A one liner would be nice if it were simple.)

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming inputs l1 and l2, you can calculate their ordered union with:

l1 + filter(lambda x: x not in l1, l2)

To get the ordered difference l1 - l2, write

filter(lambda x: x not in l2, l1)

Alternatively, use list comprehensions:

>>> l1 = [68,31,93,35,10]
>>> l2 = [93,0,22,10,99,33,21,9]
>>> l1 + [el2 for el2 in l2 if el2 not in l1]
[68, 31, 93, 35, 10, 0, 22, 99, 33, 21, 9]
>>> [el1 for el1 in l1 if el1 not in l2]
[68, 31, 35]

If you're doing this with very large list (where performance is an issue), construct a set for faster lookup:

>>> sl1 = set(s1)
>>> l1 + [el2 for el2 in l2 if el2 not in sl1]
[68, 31, 93, 35, 10, 0, 22, 99, 33, 21, 9]
>>> sl2 = set(s2)
>>> [el1 for el1 in l1 if el1 not in sl2]
[68, 31, 35]
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Would there be a major difference in speed between filter and list comprehensions? –  D K Jul 31 '11 at 13:36
    
@D K That completely depends on the Python implementation. I'd assume list comprehensions tend to be faster, but that's just a guess. With a JITing Python interpreter, both variants will almost certainly be exactly equal. –  phihag Jul 31 '11 at 13:42
    
@D K I forgot one thing: If the lists are very large, you should construct a set for faster lookup. Updated the answer. –  phihag Jul 31 '11 at 13:58
    
But sets aren't ordered. –  D K Jul 31 '11 at 20:38
    
@D K huh? Look closely, the sets are used only for membership testing, where order doesn't matter. –  phihag Jul 31 '11 at 21:06

After defining the first two lists as such,

a = [68,31,93,35,10]
b = [93,0,22,10,99,33,21,9]

Here is the one-line solution to the first problem,

c = [x for x in a+b if x not in set(a).intersection(set(b))]

And the one-liner to the second problem,

d = [x for x in a+b if x not in b]
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Maybe you could use an OrderedSet

import collections

class OrderedSet(collections.MutableSet):
    def __init__(self, iterable, *args, **kwargs):
        super(OrderedSet, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self._data = collections.OrderedDict()
        self.update(iterable)

    def update(self, iterable):
        self._data.update((x, None) for x in iterable)

    def __iter__(self):
        return iter(self._data)

    def __contains__(self, value):
        return value in self._data

    def __len__(self):
        return len(self._data)

    def __le__(self, other):
        if isinstance(other, OrderedSet):
            return self._data <= other._data
        return super(OrderedSet, self).__le__(other)

    def __and__(self, other):
        # Overrided by make the order of self the preferred one
        if isinstance(other, collections.Set):
            return self._from_iterable(value for value in self 
                                             if value in other)
        return self & set(other)

    def __ior__(self, other):
        self.update(other)
        return self

    def add(self, value):
        self._data[value] = None

    def discard(self, value):
        self._data.pop(value, None)

    def __repr__(self):
        return "%s(%r)" % (type(self).__name__, self._data.keys())
share|improve this answer
l1 = [68, 31, 93, 35,10]
l2 = [93, 0, 22, 10, 99, 33, 21,9]

l1 + [x for x in l2 if not x in l1]
# [68, 31, 93, 35, 10, 0, 22, 99, 33, 21, 9]

[x for x in l1 if not x in l2]
# [68, 31, 35]

EDIT: for long lists, you don't want to do all those list lookups. Here are two other recipes:

union:

from collections import OrderedDict
OrderedDict().fromkeys(l1+l2).keys()
# [68, 31, 93, 35, 10, 0, 22, 99, 33, 21, 9]

difference:

s = set(l2)
[x for x in l1 if not x in s]
# [68, 31, 35]
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>>> a = [68,31,93,35,10]
>>> b = [93,0,22,10,99,33,21,9]
>>> result= []
>>> temp = a + b
>>> [result.append(x) for x in temp if x not in result]
>>> result
    [68, 31, 93, 35, 10, 0, 22, 99, 33, 21, 9]
>>> a = set(a)
>>> b = set(b)
>>> a - b
    set([35, 68, 31])
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def unique_chain(*iters):
    seen = set()
    for it in iters:
        for item in it:
            if item not in seen:
                yield item
                seen.add(item)

print list(unique_chain([68, 31, 93, 35,10], [93, 0, 22, 10, 99, 33, 21,9]))
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