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My question is :

Which system memory is being used by the c# windows form, when it is running on the network through remote desktop when they are connected by LAN. The server memory or the client memory?

I need to know this because i want to store the login details of the users that are presently working on the application both from server end and the client end, in a public class. Basically, performing some sort of session management in windows form.

The OS for both the client and server is : WINDOWS SEVER 2003 (that means the sever is not logged off when the client connects remotely to it, it works normal, if i'am right).

Thanks in advance!

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

If via remote desktop, then everythig is at the server, except for the RDP client (typically mstsc.exe).

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Okay, i got. But I want to make sessions for each users in a Remote Destop Access for the c# windows Application for displaying name and fetching their database entries. How can i achieve this..? I can achieve this by updating the active_state=1 in database for the user and checking the active_state, but if more user are logged in from RDP Client, then HOW WILL I DIFFERENTIATE THEM ? – Sunil Kumar Jul 31 '11 at 14:20
    
@Sunil from their account details? – Marc Gravell Jul 31 '11 at 14:34

RDP only transfers an image of the screen. All of your application runs in the server's memory. If you want a client - server architecture, you need to divide your application into a client part and a server part.

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