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I want to make a simple math operations on a vector(array) using two cores of my CPU. The program doesn't work correctly. Please explain me how to solve my problem.

public class MyRunnable implements Runnable {

private int startIndex;
private int endIndex;
private float[] tab;

public MyRunnable(int startIndex, int endIndex, float[] tab)
{
    this.startIndex = startIndex;
    this.endIndex = endIndex;
    this.tab = tab;
}

@Override
public void run() 
{
    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread());
    for(int i = startIndex; i < endIndex; i++)
    {
        tab[i] = i * 2;
    }

    System.out.println("Finished");
}

}

public class Test {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int size = 10;
    int n_threads = 2;
    float tab[] = new float[size];

    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        tab[i] = i;
    }

    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread());

    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        System.out.println(tab[i]);
    }

    Runnable r1 = new MyRunnable(0, size / n_threads, tab );
    Runnable r2 = new MyRunnable(size / n_threads, size, tab );

    Thread t1 = new Thread(r1);
    Thread t2 = new Thread(r2);

    t1.start();
    t2.start();

    for(int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        System.out.println(tab[i]);
    }

}

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1  
you should add exact details of what doesn't work~! –  gideon Jul 31 '11 at 16:32
1  
What do you mean by "doesn't work correctly"? –  Howard Jul 31 '11 at 16:32
    
What do you expect this program to do, and what does it do instead? –  JB Nizet Jul 31 '11 at 16:34
    
How do you know that it isn't working correctly? –  crnlx Jul 31 '11 at 16:34

3 Answers 3

It seems like you don't wait for the threads to finish. Use the join method and add

t1.join();
t2.join();

just before the output loop.

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As pointed out by others, you are not waiting for your threads to finish execution. You should follow the advice of @Howard and @JK and that will fix your basic issue. If you decide to do more with threads and parallel processing though I would highly advice looking into the java.util.concurrent packages - they have many useful classes that will make your life much easier.

I took the liberty of recoding your example using Callable and ExecutorService. Please see the sample code below:

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int size = 10;
    int n_threads = 2;
    float tab[] = new float[size];

    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        tab[i] = i;
    }

    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread());

    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        System.out.println(tab[i]);
    }

    // Determine batch size, based off of number of available
    // threads.
    int batchSize = (int) Math.ceil((double) size / n_threads);
    System.out.println("Size: " + size + " Num threads: " + n_threads
            + " Batch Size: " + batchSize);

    // Create list of tasks to run
    List<Callable<Object>> tasks = new ArrayList<Callable<Object>>(
            n_threads);

    for (int i = 0; i < n_threads; i++) {
        tasks.add(Executors.callable(new MyRunnable(i * batchSize,
                ((i + 1) * batchSize) - 1, tab)));
    }

    // Create an executor service to handle processing tasks
    ExecutorService execService = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(n_threads);

    try {
        execService.invokeAll(tasks);
    } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
        ie.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    execService.shutdown();
}

    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        System.out.println(tab[i]);
    }
}

And made one slight change in your MyRunnable class, which was skipping processing on the last index:

@Override
public void run() {
    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread());
    for (int i = startIndex; i <= endIndex; i++) {
        tab[i] = i * 2;
    }

    System.out.println("Finished");
}

Works great, you can test for yourself. Theres many more classes in java.util.concurrent that can do similar functionality, feel free to explore.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
I beleive the last index was intentionally skipped (he used start inclusive/end exclusive) –  ratchet freak Jul 31 '11 at 18:21
    
eh no he doesn't. he keeps 0-based index throughout the code –  ratchet freak Jul 31 '11 at 18:47
    
you could have just kept new MyRunnable(i * batchSize, (i + 1) * batchSize, tab)) instead of what you did (makes it a tad more readable when you are used to the startindex being incl. and end index being excl.) –  ratchet freak Jul 31 '11 at 19:02
    
+1 for recoding. –  JK. Jul 31 '11 at 23:10

You can wait for the threads to finish execution by inserting calls to Thread.join():

t1.join();
t2.join();

after your x.start() function call to pause until the threads have completed. Otherwise you cannnot know if they are finished executing or not.

You should also consider synchronizing your tab[] accesses within the separate threads with a mutex/semaphore or similar mechanism, and not necessarily perform calculations directly on the passed in array reference, since this can limit the amount of concurrency (if present).

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